100W wireless charging could be a thing next year

Xiaomi Mi 10 Ultra fast wireless charging screen

  • A new leak points to 100W wireless charging by several brands in 2021.
  • Heat and battery degradation would likely be two key challenges for the tech.

We’ve seen major strides in fast charging in the last two years, as smartphone manufacturers like Huawei, BBK, and Xiaomi upped the ante for both wired and wireless charging. We’ve previously seen wired charging top out at ~120W in recent months, but wireless charging solutions aren’t far behind, either.

Now, frequent leaker Digital Chat Station has claimed that several manufacturers are targeting 100W wireless charging for phones launching in 2021. Check out the post below.

Digital Chat Station 100W wireless charging

This would be a major leap over current wireless charging standards. We’ve seen 40W wireless charging in the likes of the Oppo Ace 2 and Huawei P40 Pro Plus respectively. Oppo has also announced 65W wireless charging technology earlier this year, although we haven’t seen it on a commercial device just yet.

Nevertheless, we do wonder about heat and battery degradation with a move to 100W wireless charging. Oppo in particular stated that its 125W wired charging solution degraded the battery to 80% capacity after 800 charging cycles, compared to its 65W wired solution dropping down to 90% capacity after 800 cycles. So hopefully brands address this challenge adequately with 100W wireless charging.

Another concern with this tech is compatibility with other Qi charging devices. Oppo’s 65W wireless charging solution defaults to significantly slower 10W or even 5W topups for other Qi-compatible phones.

Would you buy a smartphone with 100W wireless charging capabilities? Take our poll below!

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Will iPhone 12 have wireless charging, or reverse charging?

At a virtual event on Tuesday, Oct. 13, Apple is expected to reveal the iPhone 12. We’ve heard a lot of rumors about the new phone’s specs, price and potential 5G features, as well as the new phone’s charging capabilities. We expect that the iPhone 12 will feature wireless charging, as every iPhone has integrated that since the iPhone 8. But on Friday, leaker Kang posted on Chinese social media site Weibo that Apple will also introduce a magnetic iPhone MagSafe charger, using the same branding as the magnetic charging cables found in its older MacBook laptops. 



a close up of electronics: The iPhone 12 is rumored to have wireless charging, and possibly reverse charging. Andrew Hoyle/CNET


© Provided by CNET
The iPhone 12 is rumored to have wireless charging, and possibly reverse charging. Andrew Hoyle/CNET



a stereo sitting on a blue surface: The iPhone 12 is rumored to have wireless charging, and possibly reverse charging. 


© Andrew Hoyle/CNET

The iPhone 12 is rumored to have wireless charging, and possibly reverse charging. 


Read more: All the iPhone 12 rumors you need to know

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The leak shows a new magnetic iPhone case with MagSafe, and two official Apple wireless chargers called MagSafe Charger and MagSafe Duo Charger. One or both of these may have a 15-watt power output. 

The leaked information also shows that the iPhone 12 could have magnetic positioning, which would move the phones to the right position on the charging pad. 

Another area of speculation is whether the new iPhone will have reverse charging — when a phone that can be charged wirelessly can also act as the charging station and be used to charge another device wirelessly. Competitors like the Samsung Galaxy S20, the Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra and the OnePlus 8 Pro have wireless and reverse wireless charging, so it’s possible that Apple would take the leap on this, at least on the iPhone 12 Pro models (rumor has it that there will be four different

Apple to Allegedly Rekindle ‘MagSafe’ Brand for Magnetic iPhone Case and Wireless Charging Accessories

A Chinese Weibo account going by the name “Kang” this morning posted allegedly accurate information for every product set to be announced at the upcoming Apple event on October 13, including details and launch dates for the full iPhone 12 lineup, and the rumored HomePod mini.

In addition, the original post also claims that Apple will announce a new magnetic iPhone case with “MagSafe” and two official Apple wireless chargers called “MagSafe Charger” and “MagSafe Duo Charger,” one or both of which will have a 15-Watt power output.


The “MagSafe” brand name will resonate with readers who remember Apple’s magnetically attached MagSafe power connector, which first appeared on MacBook Pro models in 2006 but despite its popularity was eventually discontinued across all Apple product lines between 2016 and 2019 and replaced with USB-C.

Back in August, images shared on Weibo that were said to be from the ‌iPhone 12‌ depict a circular array of magnets in the body of the device. The leak was met with speculation that the magnets could be for alignment purposes should Apple release its own wireless charger.


EverythingApplePro, who shared the images on Twitter, also posted an image of an alleged iPhone 12 case with a similar array of magnets built in, which he suggested are “likely for perfect alignment with Apple’s wireless chargers.”

For months ahead of their unveiling, last year’s iPhone 11 series was rumored to feature a Qi-based device-to-device charging feature, allowing for an Apple Watch, AirPods, and other accessories to charge on the back of the iPhones. The feature was expected to be similar to Wireless PowerShare on Samsung’s Galaxy S10. According to Ming-Chi Kuo, however, the feature was abandoned because the charging efficiency did not meet Apple’s requirements.

As it stands, Apple hasn’t released any native wireless chargers for ‌iPhone‌.

Energous Receives FCC Approval, Extending Charging Zone to Up to 1 Meter for Groundbreaking Over-the-Air, Power-at-a-Distance Wireless Charging

Class II permissive change allows for expansion of Energous’ new, non-beamforming wireless charging technology announced earlier this year

Today Energous Corporation (Nasdaq: WATT), the developer of WattUp®, a revolutionary wireless charging 2.0 technology, announced that it has received a Class II permissive change to the existing MS-550 FCC Grant, extending the charging zone up to one meter. This change, under the FCC’s Part 18 rules, allows Energous and its partners to develop and market wireless charging products that may be charged within one meter of the transmitter. It is believed to be the first time that a non-beamforming transmitter has been permitted under the FCC’s rules with a charging zone of up to one meter under the FCC’s Part 18 guidelines.

“We continue to make advances that will enable over-the air, wireless charging at-a-distance to become a reality. This permissive change from the FCC substantially expands the allowable non-beamforming footprint and broadens the wireless power transfer (WPT) applications that can be supported by this patent-pending technology. While beamforming remains a key Energous technology, having pioneered the industry’s first FCC part 18 certification, non-beamforming technology represents a less costly, less complicated path to commercialization which is being well received by our customers interested in implementing distance charging solutions,” said Stephen R. Rizzone, president and CEO of Energous Corporation. “As Energous continues to set in place the building blocks required to enable a global wireless power 2.0 solution, the ongoing pandemic has temporarily impacted our ability to put the necessary engineering and application resources on customer sites, slowing the advance of multiple product and sales cycles expected to generate revenues for the third quarter. Interest in WattUp technology remains very strong, but pandemic-related delays have had a meaningful impact causing third quarter revenues to fall significantly on a percentage basis below revenues