Call Of Duty: Black Ops Cold War — How It’s Changing For The Cross-Play Beta Weekend

The first public beta for Call of Duty: Black Ops Cold War ran this past weekend on PS4, and now developer Treyarch has outlined some of the changes in the pipeline for the next beta. The second beta is a much bigger one, as it’s coming to Xbox One and PC as well, and there will be cross-platform multiplayer support.

Weekend 2 players can expect a series of changes, including the team deathmatch score limit rising from 75 to 100 “for better match pacing,” as well as a change to the Duster Stock attachment that will slow down sliding speed.

The cooldown on the Spy Plane scorestreak has been increased to lessen the experience of having too many of them in the sky at the same time from different players.

There have also been some general changes to improve the experience, such as join-in-progress now preventing players from joining a match when it’s too close to ending.

A series of bugs have been fixed as well. Different scopes like the Snappoint, Diamondback, and Hawksmoor could block the player’s view while aiming down sights, but this has been fixed. The update also fixes an issue that could prevent players’ names from being visible in the pre-match lobby. You can see the full patch notes below.

Weekend 2 will also feature new maps, weapons, modes, playlists, Scorestreaks, Perks, Wildcards, and equipment, and Treyach will provide a rundown of these new additions soon.

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Weekend 2 kicks off on October 15, which is when all PS4 players can get in, as well as Xbox One and PC players who have preordered the game digitally. On October 17, the beta opens to everyone, regardless of preorder status, and it runs until October 19.

The Weekend 2 beta will end at 10 AM PT on Monday,

South Jersey SEO President Carol Harkins Quoted In Latest Issue of South Jersey Biz Magazine Discussing Changing With The Times – Press Release

South Jersey SEO President Carol Harkins Quoted In Latest Issue of South Jersey Biz Magazine Discussing Changing With The Times

Haddonfield, NJSouth Jersey SEO by CyberGnarus, one of the leading SEO companies in the country, is proud to announce that their President Carol Harkins was recently quoted in an article discussing ‘Changing with the Times.’ The report, which appeared in South Jersey Biz Magazine, discusses how technology has helped many businesses to survive and even thrive during the pandemic. 

In the article, Carol, who is an expert in digital media services, talks about the ever-growing importance of good internet presence and visibility. Before the pandemic struck, the vast majority of businesses could survive with their face to face customers, and many may have mistakenly believed that the internet did not apply to their business or industry. However, when the pandemic struck, and there was no longer any face to face customers, those businesses who had online visibility flourished, while those without it struggled to survive.  

“If the pandemic has taught business owners anything, it is that they need to be prepared for any and every eventuality,” said Carol Harkins of South Jersey SEO by CyberGnarus. “Diversity is the key, and it is more important than ever to have an online presence regardless of industry. If you do not currently have a visible website, then use this pandemic as the motivation you need to get your online act together and ready to experience dramatic growth in the future.”  

South Jersey SEO provides its clients with Internet visibility, which is vital in today’s world. Their goal is to capture multiple spots on Page 1 of the Google Search Results so that their clients will be selected over their competition.

For more information about the company and the services they provide, visit their website at https://www.southjerseyseo.org

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COVID-19 Is Changing Consumer Behavior At The Point-Of-Sale

As shelter-in-place orders spread across the US in mid-March, cash was already coming under fire as a potential vehicle for spreading COVID-19. Media articles and nightly news reports quickly began targeting the unsanitary aspects of physical currency, and many merchants started affixing signs to their storefronts or checkouts encouraging the use of cards, and in some cases outright banning cash. 

These developments, paired with growing concerns about physical contact and contagions, have helped drive a noticeable decline in cash utilization, according to a Q3 2020 US consumer survey fielded by 451 Research, which is part of S&P Global Market Intelligence. The survey revealed that more than two in five consumers are using cash less often since the COVID-19 outbreak started. The decline is strongest for respondents with a household income above $150,000 and those belonging to Gen X (38-53 years old), where 64% and 54% have decreased their usage, respectively.

Cash use has suffered as consumers have consciously and subconsciously looked to adhere to three key priorities while in-store:

  1. Limit what they’re coming into contact with (e.g., point of sale terminals, cash).
  2. Minimize time spent in close proximity to other people (e.g., cashiers).
  3. Avoid events that increase overall shopping time (e.g., lines, making change).

Contactless payments help address each of these concerns at checkout by enabling a more efficient and hygienic payment experience. This is important because, at least in the US, contactless has long been characterized as a solution in search of a problem.

Contactless payment adoption and usage is increasing

451’s survey has revealed two key contactless trends that have emerged from the pandemic. The first is new user activation. Many consumers that never saw a reason to use contactless before tried it for the first time, presumably given the hygienic and social-distancing benefits of tap-to-pay. More than

Hinge CEO on how online dating is changing during coronavirus

  • Since the start of the pandemic, dating apps have seen a spike in usage.
  • But users also have new concerns that these apps have to address. 
  • Business Insider spoke with the founder and CEO of Hinge, Justin McLeod, on how coronavirus has changed the face of dating for good and what the company is doing about it. 
  • Hinge is taking steps like launching a partnership with mental health space Headspace and pushing for more video-based dates – which could stay popular even after it’s safe to meet in person. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The way people meet and date has changed dramatically since the onset of the pandemic, and dating apps like Hinge are trying to keep up with the shift. 

People are going on more dates than ever before, but they’re not meeting up as frequently, Justin McLeod, founder and CEO of the dating app Hinge, told Business Insider. Hinge has adjusted its app to account for these changes. The company launched a video chat and voice call option in June. It also added an in-app link to the World Health Organization’s coronavirus safety guide. 

“Everyone has very shifting senses of what the right type of dating for them to experience is,” he said. “Managing that amount of complexity, and helping our product team manage how the world is changing so quickly, has definitely been a huge challenge.”

Across the board dating apps are seeing more traction from users. Match Group, the online dating company that owns apps like Tinder, OkCupid, and Hinge, all saw a spike in premium subscriptions and downloads since the start of the pandemic. Hinge saw a 30% increase in messages among users this past March, according to the company’s research team, Hinge Labs.

While this increased usage is good, online dating

Head of cyber security alliance warns not to put off updating security software, changing passwords

With more people working from home, it’s never been more important to make your home safe from cybercriminals.

The FBI recently reported that the number of complaints about cyberattacks to their Cyber Division is up to as many as 4,000 a day.

National Cyber Security Alliance Executive Director Kelvin Coleman said it’s simple math, more people online has caused a sharp uptick in cybercrime.

He’s seen a 400% increase from what the FBI was seeing before the coronavirus pandemic.

“We wanted to have access to our files and access to our work and now we are seeing the consequences of that,” Coleman said.

He said many of us made the mistake of not beefing up our home computer security software when the pandemic forced millions of people to work from home.

Here’s Coleman’s advice for staying safe online.

Don’t put off updating security software

Pop-ups alerting users to the latest security software updates are easily ignored, but Coleman said doing so puts users at risk to the latest tactics from hackers.

“That’s sending you the latest security updates for whatever challenges may be out there so we want people to update sooner than later,” Coleman said.

Enable multi-factor authentication

“For those that may not be as familiar, that’s the extra check-point or two beyond your username or password,” Coleman said. “Perhaps it’s a picture you’re clicking on or a code you have to verify.”

You’ll get fraud alerts on your device to confirm or stop the activity, from bank transactions to a hijacking of your food order.

Change your passwords

October is Cybersecurity AwarenessMonth and a good reminder to change your passwords.

“Believe it or not, ‘password’ or ‘password1’ arestill popular passwords for people to use. It seems unbelievable in this day and age,” Coleman said. “Those types of easy