The Music Center Announces $25 Million Gift from Philanthropists Tina and Jerry Moss to Benefit Programming and Enhance Access to Arts Experiences

LOS ANGELES, Oct. 8, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — The Music Center today announced it received a $25 million gift from Tina and Jerry Moss to benefit new programming initiatives. With this gift, the arts organization will establish an annual, free summer concert, open to all, to be held outdoors on the newly named Jerry Moss Plaza, located at The Music Center; sustain and enhance The Music Center’s commitment to free and low-cost events; and formally launch arts partnerships with community organizations to help uplift artists and their work, with an emphasis on Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC ) artists. Jerry Moss, a longtime Music Center supporter since 1968, is the legendary music executive who co-founded A&M Records with partner Herb Alpert and guided the careers of major artists, including Quincy Jones, The Carpenters, Joe Cocker, Sting and Janet Jackson, among countless other music industry luminaries.

The $25 million gift is the largest single contribution for programming that The Music Center has received in its history and will be used to increase the breadth and depth of the organization’s public presentations. Other significant gifts over the years include $20 million from philanthropist Glorya Kaufman, which made it possible for the performing arts center to create the highly popular Glorya Kaufman Presents Dance at The Music Center series—featuring presentations by world-class dance companies—along with $12 million from The Music Center Board of Directors Chair Cindy Miscikowski and the Ring-Miscikowski/The Ring Foundation, which seeded the launch of the TMC Arts Fund to produce arts education, dance and public programs at The Music Center.

The Tina and Jerry Moss gift empowers the arts organization to sustain its current free and low-cost presentations while also creating new arts experiences, supporting The Music Center’s vision to deepen the

Good Life Center offers virtual programming

Karen Lin, Contributing Photographer

While the pandemic has closed off physical access to Yale’s Good Life Center,Oliv the center’s team is continuing to provide virtual programming for students.

The Good Life Center — launched in 2018 after Silliman Head of College Laurie Santos’ class “Psychology and the Good Life” drew over 1,000 enrollees — is normally housed in the fourth floor of Silliman College. According to the center’s website, the Good Life Center is “a cultivated space to inspire, teach, and practice living the good life.” In a normal year, students could spend time in the center’s lounge, which features a tea station and physical comforts corner. They could also visit the study or the sandbox — a silent, tech-free zone. Although students cannot use these spaces now, weekly newsletters from the GLC advertise various Zoom events.

“I think in some ways the virtual format has actually made our events more accessible,” GLC Woodbridge Fellow Alexa Vaghenas ’20 said. “Students can easily pop into a workshop or guided meditation as they please, for instance, without having to travel to Silliman College.”

According to Santos, who founded the center, the GLC has been able to keep much of its old programming, including meditation classes, yoga and wellness chats.

Recently publicized virtual events include “Mindfulness and Gratitude Meditation” — which currently runs on Thursdays and Sundays — high-intensity interval training workouts and an upcoming workshop on how to feel “focused and organized” by paying attention to study space setup.

“We’ve also developed some new programming specifically for the current situation,” Santos wrote in an email to the News.

Santos explained that Vaghenas has designed a new series of events relevant to the current conditions on how athletes are handling the change that comes with losing normal season programming. The program is a

Copyright Clearance Center Announces Virtual Programming for Frankfurt Book Fair 2020

As a Premium Partner of the Book Fair, CCC Continues to Spotlight Innovation in Global Publishing

Copyright Clearance Center, Inc. (CCC), a leader in advancing copyright, accelerating knowledge, and powering innovation, has once again partnered with The Frankfurt Book Fair to spotlight innovation in global publishing.

“As the Frankfurt Book Fair is virtual this year, we are adapting our programming to resonate with audiences worldwide, celebrating the innovative solutions being developed by the publishing industry,” said Michael Healy, Executive Director, International Relations, CCC. “We look forward to engaging in valuable discussions on key issues and fully supporting the Book Fair’s 2020 motto – Signals of Hope: New Perspectives for a Stronger Future.”

As part of its partnership with the Book Fair, CCC will host interactive panel discussions and presentations by industry experts, including:

COVID-19, Copyright and the Creative Economy
Tuesday, 13 October, 11:00am – 11:30am, EDT, 17:00 CEST

The global pandemic has dramatically accelerated the shift to digital media across the globe. In the virtual environment where distance is now immaterial, humanity has both converged and been scattered. The essential work of publishing – sharing knowledge and enabling expressions – has never been more important.

  • Bodour Al Qasimi, Vice President, International Publisher Association; Founder and CEO, Kalimat Publishing Group

  • Tracey Armstrong, President and CEO, CCC

  • Fathima Dada, Managing Director of Oxford Education, OUP

  • Michael Healy, Executive Director, International Relations, CCC

Where Publishing and the Pandemic Meet
Thursday, 15 October, 11:00am – 12:00pm EDT; 17:00 – 18:00 CEST

When CCC invited senior policy makers, scholarly and society publishers, funders, institutions and researchers to meet in London last year, participants explored how best to advance scholarly research and improve the scientific publishing ecosystem. And while market disruptions, expected and unexpected, are always a factor in scientific publishing, the COVID-19 pandemic quickly became

Industrial Transformation Takes Center Stage at Cognite’s Global “Ignite Talks” October 27-29

Bernard Looney (CEO, BP), Ahmad A. Al Sa’adi (SVP of Technical Services, Saudi Aramco) and Øyvind Eriksen (President and CEO, Aker ASA) will open virtual event with session on “What’s Next for the Global Energy Transition.”

Cognite, a leader in industrial innovation, will host its third annual global conference “Ignite Talks: Industrial Intelligence Augmented: Reimagining How Minds and Machines Work Together” from Oct. 27-29, 2020. The free virtual event will feature global leaders and innovators who are driving industries and supply chains toward a more innovative, data-driven, sustainable future.

“The world is at a technological, economic, and environmental crossroads like never before, and we are looking forward to discussing pressing issues among some of the industry’s best,” said John Markus Lervik, Cognite CEO.

The full agenda for this free online conference can be found here and at www.cogniteignite.com.

Day-by-day overviews and panel highlights are listed below:

October 27: Igniting Industrial Transformation: Europe & Norway’s Leading Role

Opening day spotlights how leaders in Europe are melding minds and machines, and inspiring a transformation of heavy-asset industries and supply chains. Panel highlights:

October 28: America’s Industrial Transformation

The technology prowess of the United States and raw innovative capacity is unmatched, and its heavy-asset industries are taking steps to leverage technology at scale in order to jump-start digital transformations. What will it take to succeed, what role does technology play? Panel highlights:

  • America’s Energy Transition – in partnership with Axios: A live, virtual event, featuring in-depth 1:1 discussions with industry leaders and policymakers on the development of renewable energy in the US, how the coronavirus pandemic has affected energy patterns, and what’s next for the US oil & gas industry. This panel will be hosted by Axios energy and climate change reporter Amy Harder.

October 29: Driving a Global Transformation from

With Equal Access to Internet, Native Creators Could Take Center Stage

“Hey you. Let me teach you something about braids.” Tiktok user @the_land sits facing the camera, brushing his hair and calmly plaiting three strands on either side of his head. He speaks softly and confidently, while words flash on the screen highlighting parts of his speech. “When braiding our hair, we’re supposed to have good thoughts, because we’re connecting with our body, mind, and spirit. That’s what the three strands are for.”

The video, tagged with #nativetiktok and #indigenous, has been shared more than 28,000 times. It’s one of the most popular videos that comes up when you search those hashtags on Tiktok, and @the_land is one of the app’s most prominent Native American creators.

But if everyone had universal internet – and not just access to pricy data plans from their phones, or patchy connections that take forever to load, but clear, high-speed, robust internet access – we would see these TikToks (and Instagram influencers, and YouTube personalities) multiply. As it stands, American Indian reservations and tribal lands have some of the worst internet connectivity in the country. Earlier this year, some tribes weren’t even able to apply for free FCC broadband licences because, ironically, they didn’t have good internet connections, so they couldn’t submit all the application materials online.

And those tribes aren’t just tiny, or rural and isolated. The White Mountain Apache Reservation spans about 2,600 square miles, just a few hours from Phoenix. More than 16,000 people are members, with the majority living on the reservation. About half of those people don’t have reliable internet access, estimates David Fish, the WMAT IT director.

“If you’re willing to pay enough, you can get decent speeds. We have pretty good internet service for the tribal offices, but we pay almost $3,000 a month for it,” Fish said. Residents