Central Bucks Now Publishing New COVID Cases On Website

DOYLESTOWN, PA — The Central Bucks School District will now begin adding new positive coronavirus cases to its website, Superintendent John Kopicki announced Monday.

The move comes as the district reports seven positive COVID-19 cases since Sept. 16, including six Central Bucks East students and one employee at Lenape Middle School.

“We are confident that this process will promote transparency within the wider school community while ensuring that affected individuals are provided with necessary information related to their personal health and well-being,” Kopicki wrote in a letter to families of Central Bucks students. “We will continue to enforce our mitigation procedures and monitor any new cases as outlined within our health and safety plan.”

Applying the criteria for close personal contacts as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Pennsylvania Department of Health, students, faculty or staff who came into close personal contact with a positive individual will be notified by the building principal and receive communication regarding when they may return to in-person instruction. Close personal contact is defined by the CDC as being within approximately 6 feet of an infected person for 15 or more minutes.

Anyone who came into close contact with an infected person may be hearing from a representative from the Bucks County Health Department as part of the contact tracing process.

Positive cases are being tracked on the district’s website here.

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The Latest: England blames computer glitch for 16,000 ‘lost’ virus cases

LONDON — An epic fail of a simple computer program “lost” nearly 16,000 coronavirus cases in England for more than a week, British public health officials said.

Everyone who tested positive was informed. But the cases were left out of the daily totals between Sept. 25 and Friday and ignored by contact tracers during that time. Given the average number of in-person contacts, that means as many as 50,000 people may have been exposed without being called about it.

By Monday morning, only half of the 16,000 who tested positive had gotten a contact tracing call. The other half “should be contacted as soon as possible,” said Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who was excoriated in the House of Commons by lawmakers.

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Commuters at London’s Waterloo Station on Sept. 24 after Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a range of new restrictions to combat the rise in coronavirus cases in England. After a recent gaff, only half of the 16,000 who tested positive had gotten a contact tracing call as of Monday. The other half “should be contacted as soon as possible,” said Health Secretary Matt Hancock. Victoria Jones/PA via AP

The accounting error – blamed on operators entering data in an Excel spreadsheet program – was another serious stumble for the British government, at a crucial moment, when it is daily trying to decide where to tighten regional restrictions to slow a second wave of the virus.

After the error was spotted and the lost cases accounted for, the government’s report of new daily infections nearly doubled – from 12,872 on Saturday to 22,961 on Sunday – sparking renewed angst among officials in London and England’s north, where most of the new cases were centered.

Michael Brodie, the interim head of Public Health England, said the issue was identified late

England lost 16,000 new coronavirus cases, blames computer glitch

The glitch was no mere rounding error in the government’s accounting, but another serious stumble at a crucial moment, when the British government is daily trying to decide where to tighten regional lockdowns to slow a second wave of the virus.

After the error was spotted and the lost cases accounted for, the government’s report of new daily infections nearly doubled — from 12,872 on Saturday to 22,961 on Sunday — sparking renewed angst among officials in London and England’s north, where most of the new cases were centered.

Michael Brodie, the interim head of Public Health England, said the issue was identified late Friday in the computer process that communicates positive results from labs to the country’s reporting dashboards. Some data files containing positive results had exceeded the maximum file size, he said, according to the BBC.

“We fully understand the concern this may cause,” Brodie added, “and further robust measures have been put in place as a result.”

While health authorities said the glitch had not affected the pandemic response at the local level, 10 Downing Street announced an investigation and politicians in the opposition Labour Party described the episode as “shambolic.”

Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson told the Guardian newspaper the missing data was the latest in a “pandemic of incompetence from the government.”

Anderson said, “There are mistakes and there are really serious mistakes. This is a highly significant mistake that tells me the system is not fit for purpose.”

Paul Hunter, a professor of health protection at the University of East Anglia, told BBC Radio, “I think the thing that surprised me was the size of it — almost 16,000 results — going missing over the course of a week is quite alarming, I think.”

Hunter said for contact tracing to effective, people who were in

Coronavirus UK latest: Nearly 16k new COVID-19 cases missed due to computer glitch | UK | News

Britain reported a surge in daily COVID-19 cases to a record 22,961 on Sunday after authorities admitted a technical issue had meant that over 15,000 test results had not been transferred into computer systems on time, including for contact tracers. The technical problem, which was identified on Friday and has now been resolved, led to 15,841 cases not being uploaded into reporting dashboards used by the NHS contact-tracing system.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock is due to give a statement in the Commons later today to explain the blunder amid reports the missing results exceeded the maximum file size.

Political commentator Andrew Neil described the new as a “government shambles”.

News of the glitch was likely to cast further doubt over the robustness of the national test-and-trace system, which Prime Minister Boris Johnson said would be “world-beating” but which has experienced a series of delays and setbacks.

In terms of tracing the contacts of the infected people, Public Health England (PHE) said the information had been transferred to the relevant systems over the weekend and contact tracers were now working urgently to catch up.

The authority said all the people concerned had been given their results in a timely fashion, and that those with positive results had been told to self-isolate.

PHE said: “NHS Test and Trace have made sure that there are more than enough contact tracers working, and are working with local Health Protection Teams to ensure they also have sufficient resources to be urgently able to contact all cases.

“We are also increasing the number of call attempts from 10 to 15 over 96 hours.”.

PHE’s interim chief executive, Michael Brodie, added: ”We fully understand the concern this may cause and further robust measures have been put in place as a result.”

Work and Pensions Secretary Thérèse Coffey

Coronavirus news you may have missed overnight: Computer glitch leads to record 22,961 new cases

The total number of Covid-19 cases recorded in the UK since the start of the pandemic has exceeded 500,000, with official figures for the number of patients in hospital beginning to rise as the number of cases also increase around the country.

It comes as Boris Johnson warned the nation that the Covid-19 crisis will remain “bumpy until Christmas and possibly beyond” on Sunday.

Here is your daily roundup of coronavirus news you may have missed overnight.

An “artificially high” new daily record of almost 23,000 new Covid-19 cases were recorded in the UK on Sunday night due to a computer glitch, said the government.

Public Health England said its official Covid dashboard failed to count more than 15,000 positive results reported between 25 September and 2 October, and added it to the figures for the weekend, resulting in record rises of 12,872 on Saturday and 22,961 on Sunday.

The backlog meant contact tracing for those cases had potentially been delayed for over a week. While officials insisted it had not affected “decision-making in local areas”, the glitch has been criticised by Labour as “shambolic”.

Less than half of the UK population could receive a vaccination against coronavirus, said the head of the country’s vaccine taskforce.

Speaking to the Financial Times, Kate Bingham said officials were hoping to vaccinate around 30 million adults in the UK, which has a population of around 67 million, adding: “We just need to vaccinate everyone at risk”.

She said there would be no vaccination of people under the age of 18, and that it would be “an adult-only vaccine for people over 50”, focusing on health workers, care home workers and the vulnerable.

Lord Bethell, a health minister, has compared the UK government’s response to the coronavirus pandemic to the staging of the