When frequent political candidate Chris Young died, he left behind a valuable campaign website

He also left behind a something that no one could have predicted would suddenly become so valuable: his campaign website, wheretovote.com.

The domain, which his wife now owns, used to redirect users to Young’s Facebook page, and is now broken. But in a year where the coronavirus pandemic has created so much uncertainty around voting in next month’s election, political strategists say it’s a shame that a website that could have been used for a good cause – like encouraging people to vote – is blank. And they say a sale of the domain could have fetched a small fortune from advocacy groups or even candidates for office.

“It’s common practice to direct multiple sites like this one to a voter information platform,” said Michael Halle, a former senior advisor to Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign. “It would be great to have this one in the arsenal.”

Unlike the conventional candidate who purchases a campaign website with his or her name in the URL – current Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza uses ElorzaforMayor.com, for example – Young created wheretovote.com on March, 6, 2002, according to domain records. He ran for Providence mayor for the first time that year.

Young initially used the URL to redirect to a GeoCities website that included campaign positions on issues like crime, taxes, education, and affordable housing. In 2006, when he attempted to run for US Senate, lieutenant governor, and mayor all at the same time, the website included an American flag background and the slogan, “Campaign for Justice.” In more recent years, he used his campaign website to advocate for taxing Brown University and posted pictures of his wife and daughter.

Young, who described himself as an electrical engineer and media consultant, remained a fierce anti-abortion advocate right up to his death. He died while driving

Sen. Ernst’s Dem challenger seen backing Black Lives Matter group, despite no position on campaign website

EXCLUSIVE: Theresa Greenfield, the Democrat challenging Iowa Sen. Joni Ernst for her Senate seat, has admitted to supporting the Black Lives Matter organization in a video obtained exclusively by Fox News, even though her campaign website made no mention of her thoughts toward the group.

Greenfield previously has backed the movement and activists peacefully protesting, but had kept relatively quiet about the organization, which has courted controversy in the past.

“Yeah,” Greenfield said in a video shot in Des Moines on Sept. 17 by media watchdog Accuracy in Media while shaking her head in the affirmative when asked if she supported the BLM organization.

“I don’t know if there’s any reason it doesn’t appear on the website,” she said when asked why the words “Black Lives Matter” did not appear on her campaign’s website. “Let me take a look at it, ’cause I talk about it all the time.”

IOWA REPUBLICAN FILES FEC COMPLAINT OVER ‘DARK MONEY’ GOING TO SEN. ERNST’S DEM RIVAL

Greenfield’s husband, Steve Miller, added that she has “been working with all the Black leaders” across the state. He said Republicans were “using that law-and-order thing and we know all about that bull—-.”

Campaign staffer Brittan Ostby also confirmed Greenfield supported BLM.*

The Greenfield campaign did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment. 

Black Lives Matter has pursued controversies in the past. Among them: Co-founder Patrisse Cullors described fellow organizers as “trained Marxists” in a newly surfaced 2015 video, and the group apparently deleted a page on its website that called for changes to “the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement” in favor of “extended families and ‘villages’ that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.”

Matthew Bruce, the leader of the organization in Iowa,

Hilton Inspires Travelers to Make New Memories with the U.S. Launch of Insights-Driven Global Marketing Campaign

Research Reveals Travel Is the Most Frequently Recalled Happy Memory, And Nearly Two-Thirds Say They Plan Trips to Create Memories with Family and Friends

Hilton has announced the U.S. debut of “To New Memories,” its first global marketing campaign since the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The insights-driven initiative reflects consumers’ desire to reconnect with the people and places they love. The campaign comes on the heels of a new survey uncovering that travel memories are some of the happiest memories of consumers’ lives (89% of survey respondents), suggesting that most Americans (188 million) would say they are experiencing a travel memory deficit. The results also revealed the optimism and desire consumers have for traveling again soon, a feeling that is reflected in the new campaign and new Hilton packages and promotions.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201012005110/en/

Still photo from Hilton’s To New Memories campaign. (Photo: Business Wire)

The global marketing effort, first launched in September in China, the United Kingdom and Germany, is rolling out on October 12 in the U.S. and Saudi Arabia. As a catalyst for memories for more than 100 years, Hilton developed the campaign to inspire consumers to move from dreaming to planning their next trip to create new memories.

“While so much has changed this year, some things remain true – people crave connections, seeking out the reliable, friendly experiences that only our hospitality can provide,” said Chris Nassetta, president and chief executive officer, Hilton. “Hilton is here to help you make new memories, whenever you are ready.”

A new survey commissioned by Hilton shows that nearly nine in 10 travelers say travel memories are some of the happiest of their lives, while 95% of survey respondents who travel are missing travel right now and 90% of survey

Google contractor accused of offshoring jobs in retaliation for union campaign

Google contractors who recently unionized say their jobs are being slowly shipped to Poland. On Thursday, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) filed a complaint laying out the allegations against HCL America, an engineering and IT contractor that works with Google in Pittsburgh.



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© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


Obtained by Motherboard, the complaint argues the jobs are being outsourced in retaliation for legitimate union activity. In particular, the NLRB says the conduct took place “because employees formed, joined and assisted the Union and engaged in concerted activities, and to discourage employees from engaging in these activities.”

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None of the affected workers are legal employees of Google, but they specialize in engineering and IT tasks for HCL. The contractors voted to unionize in 2019, organizing under the United Steelworkers union. According to the complaint, the company has failed to bargain with the newly formed unit and has transferred work previously undertaken by the team to offshore workers in Kraków, Poland.

Google did not respond to a request for comment.

Contract workers have been a significant aspect of employee activism at Google, including a public memo sent in March by full-time employees in March demanding better treatment for the contract workforce.

Temporary, vendor, and contract employees outnumber full-time Google employees, and typically face lower wages and less job security. In May, Google abruptly rescinded more than 2000 incoming contracts, citing cost-cutting measures spurred by the global pandemic. Because the workers were not yet under contract, the measures were not legally considered to be layoffs and the workers were ineligible for unemployment insurance as a result.

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Uber engineer speaks out against company’s $186M campaign, says it’ll hurt drivers

As Uber has poured tens of millions of dollars into a California ballot measure to avoid classifying its drivers as employees, one engineer from inside the ride-hailing company spoke out against this campaign on Tuesday. In an op-ed published by TechCrunch, Kurt Nelson said Uber doesn’t have drivers’ interests in mind.

“Uber works because it’s cheap and it’s quick,” Nelson wrote. “But it’s become clear to me that this is only possible because countless drivers are spending their personal time sitting in their cars, waiting to pick up a ride, completely unpaid. Workers are subsidizing the product with their free labor.”


Nelson is one of only a handful of gig economy company employees to speak out against Proposition 22. It’s been historically rare to see tech workers criticize their employers’ positions. But that’s starting to change. Google employees organized walk-outs in 2018 over the company’s handling of sexual harassment allegations and Facebook employees staged a virtual protest in June after the company refused to take down inflammatory posts by President Donald Trump.


Nelson said he’s been a software engineer at Uber for two years, writing code for the company’s Android app. But when he was in college, he drove for the ride-hailing company Lyft. He said that experience gave him insight into what it’s like to be a driver and how difficult it can be when workers don’t have benefits.

Uber, Lyft and other gig economy companies currently classify their drivers as independent contractors, which means the workers pay for their own expenses, such as gas, car maintenance and insurance. Drivers also don’t have labor benefits like minimum wage, health insurance or paid sick leave. If they were to be classified as employees, many of those costs would then fall onto the companies.

In an effort to give gig workers