6 essential SEO tips for tourism businesses

Whether you run a guest house, a game farm, an eatery, an adventure attraction or a transport service, the national lockdown has probably been hard on your tourism or travel business. As the country’s lockdown restrictions ease to level 1, you are no doubt looking forward to being able to welcome guests back to your destination.

Just ask one of our customers, Vinolia Masera, founder of travel and leisure portal, Limpopo Guide, who says:

“Having a small start-up business in the tourism industry has been challenging during lockdown. With the easing of lockdown restrictions to level 1, a lot of businesses will be able to bounce back and start making money again, so they will potentially have the means to invest in marketing again.”

After the long hiatus, you may have deactivated many of your marketing plans and campaigns. One place where travel and tourism businesses can help their business to be more visible online is from search engine optimisation (SEO). Here are some helpful tips on how you can move your website to one of the top spots on Google and other popular search engines result pages.

Optimise your listing

One way to help ensure your business is listed within the top search results online is to optimise search engine visibility. That means using keywords on your website that accurately describe your business. Search engines like Google or Bing will pick up those keywords and match them to your site in their results.The right keywords are among the factors that help push your listing closer to the top of the results page. GoDaddy, for example has developed an SEO tool integrated with Website Builder, that automatically reviews your website and includes relevant, high-value keywords and phrases to help improve your website’s search results ranking.

Google My Business (GMB) is

4 Essential Tasks New Bootstrapped Businesses Should Outsource


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Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


When you’re bootstrapping your startup, it can be tempting to try to do everything yourself in an attempt to save money. After all, when you don’t have VC backing on your side, you have to stretch every dollar!

However, a do-it-all mentality could ultimately backfire in the long run. If you want to make the most of your financial resources and achieve the growth that will take your startup to the next level, you’re going to have to outsource.

No matter what industry you’re working in, each startup will have essential, time-consuming tasks that can easily take your attention away from the big-picture issues that affect your company’s long-term health. Ignoring these “everyday” tasks will limit your growth — but so will spending too much of your own time on them.

The solution, of course, is strategically outsourcing tasks.

1. Accounting and bookkeeping

Knowing how your money is being spent and where your revenue is coming from is vital for any bootstrapped business — but crunching the numbers is far more complicated than you might think. This is one area where even a seemingly tiny error could have big ramifications for your business.

It’s generally recommended that you outsource this work to bookkeepers, who accurately record all financial information associated with your business, as well as accountants, who use this information to prepare tax documents and profit and loss statements. Making use of both will take a lot of responsibilities off your plate, eliminating a major stressor for startup founders.

Yahoo Small Business estimates that outsourcing these tasks can reduce monthly bookkeeping costs by 40 percent. Even more importantly, you don’t run the risk of making an error that gets you into tax trouble or puts

How Amazon Prime Day helps entrepreneurs build million-dollar businesses

  • Amazon Prime Day on Oct. 13 and Oct. 14 will offer thousands of small businesses opportunities to quickly scale customer awareness and revenue.
  • Currently, more than 500,000 small and medium-sized businesses in the U.S. sell on Amazon, and the company’s goal is to onboard an additional 100,000 vendors as new sellers to its store.
  • The online event has helped companies like Furbo that makes a dog camera clinch strategic partnerships and make millions of dollars in online sales.





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Come Oct. 13 and 14, Amazon’s annual two-day members-only online sales extravaganza Prime Day will bring customers over one million deals on myriad products in popular categories including home accessories, toys, and electronics. But in addition to providing shoppers with steep savings starting at midnight PST on Tuesday, the popular sales promotion will also offer thousands of small businesses opportunities to quickly scale customer awareness and revenue.

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Currently, more than 500,000 small and medium-sized businesses in the U.S. sell on Amazon, and the company’s goal is to onboard an additional 100,000 vendors as new sellers to its store. Despite the ongoing pandemic, third-party sellers continue to crowd its virtual aisles, and presently account for over half of all units sold via the online retailer. In the 12-month period ending in May alone, American SMB sellers sold more than 3.4 billion products, up from 2.7 billion year-over-year, and averaged $160,000 in sales, up from approximately $100,000 a year prior.

“Prime Day offers small businesses added exposure to millions of shoppers globally,” explains Maggie Cheung, co-founder of breakout hit home electronics device the Furbo Dog Camera. The five year-old company has been an Amazon seller since October 2016 and first began participating in Prime Day in 2017. “Our first year, we were given the spotlight deal … it

Yelp will begin flagging businesses with “racist behavior”

“Communities have always turned to Yelp in reaction to current events at the local level. As the nation reckons with issues of systemic racism, we’ve seen in the last few months that there is a clear need to warn consumers about businesses associated with egregious, racially-charged actions to help people make more informed spending decisions,” Malik wrote.

But some people are concerned that the Yelp label could be misused and incorrectly ostracize businesses who may not deserve it.

“The problem with this is that people may use it to cancel businesses unjustifiably,” one Twitter user wrote in response to the news Friday.

Yelp said it has a system in place to try to prevent that from happening. The company’s user operations team already investigates and disables reviews or puts alerts on business pages if it finds that the business is seeing a huge uptick in reviews in response to news reports, rather than from people who have actually visited. Those are in place to let people know that the business is getting a lot of public attention, and recent reviews might not be from firsthand experience.

The new “Business Accused of Racist Behavior” alert takes that one step further by putting the warning on business pages “when there’s resounding evidence of egregious, racist actions from a business owner or employee,” Malik said in a statement. In that case, Yelp will link to a news article from a “credible media outlet” that explains the issue.

Yelp has faced allegations in the past that it favors positive reviews for advertisers, which it has denied. In addition, some restaurant owners have already long harbored animosity toward Yelp, where they say a few bad reviews can affect their bottom lines. A 2011 Harvard Business School study found that the difference between a 3-star rating

Yelp rolls out new tactic to warn consumers about businesses accused of ‘overtly racist actions’

Yelp has a zero tolerance policy for racism.

The company, which publishes and aggregates crowd-sourced business reviews, announced Thursday it will be placing a new “Business Accused of Racist Behavior Alert” on Yelp pages to warn users about businesses that have been said to display “overtly racist actions.” They will also include a direct link to a news article for consumers to learn more about the reported incident.

SUPPORT BLACK BUSINESSES: These black-owned Houston restaurants need your support during the COVID-19 crisis

“We know these values are important to our users and now more than ever, consumers are increasingly conscious of the types of businesses they patronize and support,” Noorie Malik, vice president of user operations, wrote in a blog post. “In fact, we’ve seen that reviews mentioning Black-owned businesses were up more than 617% this summer compared to last summer. Support for women-owned businesses has also increased, with review mentions up 114% for the same time period.”

Malik said that as the nation continues to be affected by systemic racism, Yelp feels an obligation to help consumers make better decisions before spending their hard-earned dollars with businesses associated with egregious, racially-charged actions.

“So far in 2020, we’ve seen a 133% increase in the number of media-fueled incidences on Yelp compared to the same time last year,” said Malik.


Malik wrote that between May 26, a day after the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis police custody, and September 30, a week after the Breonna Taylor verdict was announced, Yelp has placed more than 450 alerts on business pages that were either accused of or the target of racist behavior related to the Black Lives Matter movement.

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