Camila Russo: Ethereum Is Building the Internet of Value

The internet is at the cusp of entering a new phase, one where entrenched rulers are dethroned, more power is reclaimed by individuals and value moves as freely as cat GIFs.

To understand why we need a better internet in the first place, consider this question: Isn’t it weird the internet isn’t good at money? Think about it. The applications we use every day to search, to communicate, even to shop; the companies that dominate the web are very bad at dealing with money, even if they’re very good at making it. There’s a separate checkout process, where you repeatedly enter all your information. Cards issued in some countries don’t work on local websites in other countries. Sometimes you wait for what feels like an eternity watching that tiny wheel turn, to have the transaction fail. 

Camila Russo is the founder of The Defiant, a content platform focusing on decentralized finance, and the author of “The Infinite Machine” about the history of Ethereum. Previously, she was a Bloomberg News reporter covering markets in Buenos Aires, Madrid and New York. She is a speaker at CoinDesk’s invest: ethereum economy event beginning Oct. 14.

More complex transactions are almost unthinkable. Influencers and creators should be able to monetize their likes, retweets and views, with micropayments streamed from followers, without any platform taking a cut. Less-famous mortals should get paid if they opt in to view ads or consent to sharing their information. Transferring ownership of valuable assets, from art to real estate, shouldn’t take several intermediaries and tons of paperwork.

There’s the internet’s TCP/IP protocol. There are apps built on top of it. And, separately, there’s the financial system, which relies largely on infrastructure built before the internet was invented. SWIFT, IBAN, the rails handling most international money transfers, weren’t designed to

Hyundai begins building electric vehicle hub in Singapore

SINGAPORE (Reuters) – South Korea’s Hyundai Motor Co started construction on a research and development centre in Singapore on Tuesday that will house a small-scale electric vehicle production facility.

Speaking at the groundbreaking ceremony, Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong said the facility may produce up to 30,000 electric vehicles (EVs) annually by 2025 and represents an investment of S$400 million ($295 million).

Singapore is one of the world’s most expensive places to buy a car and does not currently have any auto manufacturing capacity. But the wealthy city-state has set out ambitious plans to phase out petrol vehicles by 2040.

“Automotive activities are becoming viable in Singapore once again. EVs have a different supply chain, fewer mechanical parts and more electronics, which plays to Singapore’s strengths,” PM Lee said.

A Hyundai spokeswoman confirmed the 30,000 unit target but said that the exact capacity was yet to be determined. The facility is due for completion by end 2022, the firm said in a statement.

The announcement comes after vacuum cleaner company Dyson last year scrapped plans to build an electric car in Singapore, saying it was not commercially viable.

Singapore plans to phase out petrol and diesel vehicles by 2040, and make a bigger bet on electrification to cut greenhouse gases and slow climate change.

Hyundai said in a statement its new Singapore facility aims to be carbon neutral by using solar and hydrogen energy, will utilise technologies such as artificial intelligence and robotics, and will include a test drive track for customers.

The centre is part of Hyundai’s vision to enable future vehicle buyers to customize and purchase vehicles online using a smartphone, allowing production to be on-demand.

($1 = 1.3590 Singapore dollars)

(Reporting by John Geddie and Aradhana Aravindan in Singapore; Editing by Ana Nicolaci da Costa)

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Building Small-Business Resiliency in a Pandemic

Join us for this free webinar, featuring renowned keynote speaker and futurist Brian Solis, to learn the top entrepreneurial trends, challenges, and goals.

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Covid-19 turned the world upside-down in March and businesses of all sizes were presented with never-before-seen-challenges. The way we work, sell, service and market to customers has forever changed.

Six months later, how are growing small- and medium-size businesses (SMBs) handling the new economy? Join us for a free webinar, Motivating Trends: Building Small-Business Resiliency in a Pandemic, to find out. During this live conversation, we’ll uncover data-backed insights and strategies from new research gleaned from more than 2,000 SMB leaders from around the world.

Journalist and CultureBanx CEO Kori Hale will interview renowned keynote speaker, futurist, award-winning author, and Global Innovation Evangelist for Salesforce, Brian Solis. For nearly three decades, Solis has helped executives of leading brands and startups understand what’s happening and why, visualize future trends, and deliver the future they want to see.

Attendees of this webinar will learn:

  • The top trends impacting SMBs from Salesforce’s annual SMB Trends Report
  • How SMBs are using the pandemic and racial injustices as motivation
  • New ways to drive innovation through digital transformation
  • Various ways to plan for the future and build business resiliency

Brought to you by Salesforce and Entrepreneur, Motivating Trends: Building Small-Business Resiliency in a Pandemic will take place live on Wednesday, November 18, at 2 p.m. EST | 11 a.m. PST.

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Link Building is Still Highly Relevant for SEO in 2020, Say Experts – Press Release

Many website owners have faced the following scenario quite often: After creating and publishing the best piece of content ever on their website, they sit back and hope to see it show up in Google – and then, nothing happens.

Holbaek (Denmark), and Karlsruhe (Germany) — Two guys from Denmark (Brian Petersen) and Germany(Fabian Pott) are dealing with the same struggle as every other website owners: SEO.

Is Link Building Dead

“Build it, and they would come” does not seem to work, say the two. Especially on a brand-new domain without any authority in the eyes of Google.

“Without a reputation, you are a nobody, and Google needs to see and understand that you have relevance to rank you in Google – and the secret sauce is to gain links from sites that already have gained trust and authority,” says Brian Petersen.

By gaining links from relevant sites in a niche, it is possible to increase website authority.

When a website starts to gain authority, it also starts to rank for more search phrases and is gaining more organic (non-paid) traffic.

“Think about external links as road signs – the more signs that point to a specific location, the more sure you can be that you are on the right track – that is how Google reads links. A link from a website with high authority is like a giant billboard road sign,” adds Brian Petersen.

“Link building seems to be one of the hardest struggles for everybody who works with SEO. This is usually the part of SEO that most of my clients are more than happy to outsource,” says Fabian Pott.

Link building does not need to be complicated, he says. Almost every blog on the internet relies on a steady stream of quality content for its readers.

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CNCF’s Priyanka Sharma on building an open source movement during a pandemic

When Priyanka Sharma took the reins at the Cloud Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) this summer, it was hard to say whether her timing was auspicious or ominous.

As general manager of the organization that oversees the fast-growing open source movement, she is in an immensely influential position. But with a global pandemic upending everyone’s plans, she knew the foundation’s priorities would need to adapt.

For four months now, she’s been trying to strike a balance between helping the foundation navigate its technical mission and tending to the well-being of its community. What she’s learned so far is that both aspects are essential for an open source movement to thrive.

“Many people are like, ‘Oh, what a terrible time to walk into this job,’” Sharma said. “But I think it’s been really good because I’ve had a chance to step up and help the community go through a challenging period.”

A new cloud infrastructure

Founded in 2015, the CNCF is an open source organization that operates under the umbrella of the Linux Foundation. The CNCF’s mandate is to oversee the ecosystem of tools being developed to drive the growth of “microservices,” or “cloud-native computing.”

This approach to developing cloud infrastructure, which relies on containers, holds that breaking applications into smaller, self-contained units can significantly reduce the costs and time needed to write, deploy, and manage them. The result should be a web that is faster yet more stable. Just as compelling to proponents, it should deliver a more open web that makes it easier for users to change cloud platforms.

As containers began taking off several years ago, Google developed an orchestration platform called Kubernetes to manage them. Google approached the Linux Foundation about open-sourcing Kubernetes, and those talks led to the creation of the CNCF, which also counts Twitter, Huawei,