Software spots and fixes hang bugs in seconds, rather than weeks — ScienceDaily

Hang bugs — when software gets stuck, but doesn’t crash — can frustrate both users and programmers, taking weeks for companies to identify and fix. Now researchers from North Carolina State University have developed software that can spot and fix the problems in seconds.

“Many of us have experience with hang bugs — think of a time when you were on website and the wheel just kept spinning and spinning,” says Helen Gu, co-author of a paper on the work and a professor of computer science at NC State. “Because these bugs don’t crash the program, they’re hard to detect. But they can frustrate or drive away customers and hurt a company’s bottom line.”

With that in mind, Gu and her collaborators developed an automated program, called HangFix, that can detect hang bugs, diagnose the relevant problem, and apply a patch that corrects the root cause of the error. Video of Gu discussing the program can be found here.

The researchers tested a prototype of HangFix against 42 real-world hang bugs in 10 commonly used cloud server applications. The bugs were drawn from a database of hang bugs that programmers discovered affecting various websites. HangFix fixed 40 of the bugs in seconds.

“The remaining two bugs were identified and partially fixed, but required additional input from programmers who had relevant domain knowledge of the application,” Gu says.

For comparison, it took weeks or months to detect, diagnose and fix those hang bugs when they were first discovered.

“We’re optimistic that this tool will make hang bugs less common — and websites less frustrating for many users,” Gu says. “We are working to integrate Hangfix into InsightFinder.” InsightFinder is the AI-based IT operations and analytics startup founded by Gu.

The paper, “HangFix: Automatically Fixing Software Hang Bugs for Production Cloud Systems,”

The Pentagon Is Powerful, But It Is Struggling To Kill The F-35’s Software Bugs

Here’s What You Need To Remember: While the F-35 continues to be an advanced fighter jet, there are times when it is clear that upgrading an old war bird like the B-52 is often a lot easier than working out the bugs in what should be a state-of-the-art fighter jet.

Introduced in the 1950s, the B-52 Stratofortress has remained in service thanks in part to the numerous upgrades it has received over the years. In fact, because it was introduced before the days of advanced computers, the B-52 has actually been at times much easier to update than more modern aircraft.

By contrast, the U.S. military’s highly advanced F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, which was developed with the latest and greatest aviation computer systems and software, has had no shortage of problems and bugs to work out, while upgrades have been anything but easy.

ALIS In:

Since its introduction, the F-35s ground-based ALIS logistical system, intended to streamline reporting and implement predictive maintenance, has for years remained buggy to the point of “dysfunctionality” – requiring constant manual inputs and workarounds when automated systems failed to do what they were supposed to do.

The problem with software has been so great that earlier this year, the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) even warned that the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program, despite producing more aircraft and at negotiated lower prices in 2019, is not meeting the standards that the aircraft’s customers might have expected.

The good news is that the F-35’s next tech upgrade could address many of the issues, but the bad news is that it could also just add billions more to the cost of the aircraft Ars Technica reported this week.

Third Time’s the Charm:

The Tech Refresh 3 program for the fifth-generation stealth fighter will include an upgrade of

Spellbreak Update 1.1 Fixes Bugs, Adds Anti-Cheat Measures, And Smooths Out Aiming Issues

Spellbreak, a free-to-play battle royale where every player has an elemental power to fight with, has received its first major update. The game, which launched on PC, Switch, PS4, and Xbox One on September 3, has updated to version 1.1, and has fixed numerous bugs and issues in the process.

Update 1.1 brings several fixes to Spellbreak across all platforms, as well as some system-specific changes for each different version of the game. It doesn’t add any major new features, but instead focuses on tweaking and improving what is already there.

“We wanted the focus of this one to be on stability and performance across all of our platforms,” the Spellbreak blog reads before detailing the patch notes.

The complete patch notes for Spellbreak Update 1.1 are below.

Gameplay

  • The Lighting Bolts spell’s recovery animation can now be interrupted by casting a sorcery.
  • Fix edge case where reviving or exiling someone could be canceled in order to get faster spell firing.
  • Fixed an issue that caused projectiles to sometimes not register damage even though they hit.

Aim Assist

  • Smoothed out difference in aim assist strength between different framerates.
    • This results in more consistent behavior for all players and eliminates advantages that came from very high framerate.
  • Fixed an exploit where aim assist could be much stronger than intended under certain combinations of distance to target and input sensitivity.
    • This meant it was possible for players under certain circumstances to make their spells incredibly easy to hit. This was mostly clearly seen with the Lightning Gauntlet on PC.
  • Adjusted aim assist values for various console platforms.
  • Aim assist now decreases over distance.
  • Default Look Deadzone setting on Switch is now 0%.
    • This is generally what you want, because deadzones are handled by the OS itself.

Miscellaneous

  • Enabled some extra anti-cheat mechanisms.