Which Is The Best Budget 5G Phone?

KEY POINTS

  • Samsung has announced the new Galaxy A42 5G, a budget smartphone with support for 5G
  • The device is cheaper than the OnePlus Nord
  • The Galaxy A42 5G’s specs aren’t top-tier, but its price won’t hurt the wallet

South Korean tech giant Samsung has announced a new 5G smartphone that’s more affordable than the newly-released Galaxy S20 FE – and is even cheaper than the OnePlus Nord.

Samsung has announced the new Galaxy A42 5G, its first budget smartphone offering support for 5G connectivity. The device will be sold for £349 (about $455) in the U.K. and is cheaper than the OnePlus Nord by about £30 since the latter currently sells for £379 apiece. It is the latest in Samsung’s attempts to win a bigger share in the smartphone market, particularly in the budget device category.

The new Galaxy A42 5G boasts midrange specs that are comparable to the ones found on the OnePlus Nord. Here’s a quick look at the new handset’s specs and features:

Processor

As per The Verge, the device is powered by a Snapdragon 750G, a new processor Qualcomm announced just last month. This is backed by 4GB of RAM. The device offers 128GB of internal storage, expandable via microSD card.

It’s worth noting that the device’s processor is not as powerful as the Snapdragon 765G found on the OnePlus Nord, which also has a bigger 8GB RAM.

Display

The Galaxy A42 5G has a 6.6-inch HD+ sAMOLED Infinity-U display, which has a small notch for a front-facing camera. There’s an in-display fingerprint reader for authentication.

Cameras

At the back of the device rests a quad-camera setup comprised of a 48MP wide, 8MP ultrawide, 5MP macro and 5MP depth sensor. At the front is a 20MP selfie snapper.

Battery

The device has a large 5,000

Here’s why Amazon pulled the plug on its first big budget video game ‘Crucible’ shortly after launch

(Crucible Image)

Amazon Game Studios and Relentless Studios’ online third-person shooter Crucible will be taken offline. An entry labeled as a “final update” on its official development blog went up late on Friday afternoon to inform fans and beta testers that work on the game would be discontinued.

Crucible had been in development since 2014 when it launched on May 20, and was initially heralded as Amazon’s big attempt to break into the video game market. It was initially free to play and download, with a number of in-game purchases that offered new character costumes, additional currency, and other extras.

However, Crucible quickly ran into a host of problems, including server issues, lukewarm reviews, and criticism over its “freemium” pricing model. A little over a month later, on June 30, Amazon yanked Crucible from digital storefronts and returned it to a closed beta.

Since then, Crucible‘s primary developers at Seattle-based Relentless Studios have made steady incremental updates to the game, tracking each one on a public-facing Trello as a roadmap. They’d completed almost all of the features that they planned to add, with updates going live as recently as this week, but after evaluating player feedback and internal data, decided to pull the plug.

“We very much appreciate the way that our fans have rallied around our efforts, and we’ve loved seeing your responses to the changes we’ve made over the last few months, but ultimately we didn’t see a healthy, sustainable future ahead of Crucible,” the team wrote in its blog post. “We’ll be transitioning our team to focus on New World and other upcoming projects from Amazon Games.”

Crucible.

Crucible is what game enthusiasts often call a “hero shooter,” where players pick from a cast of characters with unique abilities and equipment to compete with one

Budget 2020: Everything within Canberra’s AU$796.5 million Digital Business Plan

The federal government had already promised AU$796.5 million over four years from 2020-21 through its Digital Business Plan to further drive progress towards Australia becoming a leading digital economy by 2030.

In its Budget 2020-21, the government detailed the plan that’s aimed at improving productivity, income growth, and jobs by supporting the adoption of digital technologies by Australian businesses.

“There is no economic recovery without a jobs recovery,” Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said in delivering his Budget speech on Tuesday night. “There is no budget recovery without a jobs recovery.

“This Budget is all about jobs.”

The measures under the JobMaker Plan — Digital Business Plan label cover: Modern digital infrastructure, reduced regulatory barriers, small and medium enterprise (SME) support and capability, and a digital government that is easier to do business with.

The near-AU$800 million will be shared over four years by 16 government departments, with Services Australia receiving the most — AU$51.6 million — in the first year. The Australian Taxation Office will see AU$44.7 million in 2020-21; and the Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC), and the Digital Transformation Agency (DTA) will all receive around AU$25 million in 2020-21.

As detailed in the Budget papers [PDF], measures under the Digital Business Plan to support modern digital infrastructure include: AU$22.1 million over three years from 2020-21 to establish the Australian 5G Innovation Initiative to support private sector investment in 5G testbeds and trials; as well as AU$7.2 million over two years from 2020-21 to support the accelerated deployment of 5G infrastructure by improving the allocation and management of spectrum.

Measures to reduce regulatory barriers include: AU$28.6 million in the first year to continue the implementation of the Consumer Data Right (CDR) and commence work on its rollout in the energy sector,