Missouri blames database error on website for COVID-19 spike

A “database extract error” resulted in an incorrect inflation of the number of reported COVID-19 cases in Missouri going back over several days, Missouri health officials said Sunday.

The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services said in a news release that it is in the process of migrating all COVID-19 testing and case data into one new consolidated system.

The state launched a new version of its coronavirus dashboard on Sept. 28 to integrate pandemic response across public health, economic, employment and social impact indicators.

Missouri incorrectly reported Saturday on its coronavirus website more than 5,000 new COVID-19 cases, more than double the previous single-day record.

The agency said Sunday it is working urgently to resolve the issue and will update its website with the correct numbers once that is done. It said the problems with the data were limited to cumulative reporting on its Show Me Strong Covid-19 Public Health Dashboard.

The revised coronavirus numbers for Missouri are pending.

“When this issue was initially raised Saturday morning, the dashboard team began working through the data to identify the problem and are working through the weekend to correct the underlying issue,” said Dr. Randall Williams, the agency’s director. “Missourians should feel confident that we appreciate their feedback and continue to adapt our processes to ensure effective and accountable reporting to our citizens.”

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The Latest: England blames computer glitch for 16,000 ‘lost’ virus cases

LONDON — An epic fail of a simple computer program “lost” nearly 16,000 coronavirus cases in England for more than a week, British public health officials said.

Everyone who tested positive was informed. But the cases were left out of the daily totals between Sept. 25 and Friday and ignored by contact tracers during that time. Given the average number of in-person contacts, that means as many as 50,000 people may have been exposed without being called about it.

By Monday morning, only half of the 16,000 who tested positive had gotten a contact tracing call. The other half “should be contacted as soon as possible,” said Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who was excoriated in the House of Commons by lawmakers.

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Commuters at London’s Waterloo Station on Sept. 24 after Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson announced a range of new restrictions to combat the rise in coronavirus cases in England. After a recent gaff, only half of the 16,000 who tested positive had gotten a contact tracing call as of Monday. The other half “should be contacted as soon as possible,” said Health Secretary Matt Hancock. Victoria Jones/PA via AP

The accounting error – blamed on operators entering data in an Excel spreadsheet program – was another serious stumble for the British government, at a crucial moment, when it is daily trying to decide where to tighten regional restrictions to slow a second wave of the virus.

After the error was spotted and the lost cases accounted for, the government’s report of new daily infections nearly doubled – from 12,872 on Saturday to 22,961 on Sunday – sparking renewed angst among officials in London and England’s north, where most of the new cases were centered.

Michael Brodie, the interim head of Public Health England, said the issue was identified late

Emails: Palantir blames Morgan Stanley for ‘blemished’ direct listing

  • In two emails sent internally this weekend, Palantir Technologies blamed Morgan Stanley for a “failure” that left some employee and alumni shareholders unable to sell their shares when the company made its public debut last Wednesday.
  • The problem stemmed from a glitch with Morgan Stanley’s trading platform Shareworks.
  • In an unsigned email sent late in the evening Sunday, Palantir said it had heard from Morgan Stanley that the bank was in a “war room” all weekend working to determine which shareholders were owed compensation. 
  • A spokesperson for Shareworks at Morgan Stanley said the issue was a “slowness” that “may have resulted in delayed logins into our system.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Palantir placed blame squarely on Morgan Stanley following a glitch in the bank’s trading software Shareworks on Wednesday, according two unsigned emails sent to “Palantirians” on Saturday and Sunday, which were obtained by Business Insider.

That glitch temporarily prevented some employee and alumni shareholders from selling shares during the tech company’s direct listing.

Morgan Stanley “intends to ‘make people whole’ who were affected by the Shareworks failure,” Palantir wrote in the email from Saturday.

“We have and will continue to put the weight of the company behind protecting our hobbits and helping make sure Morgan Stanley is good to its word,” that email said, referring to employees with a reference to “Lord of the Rings.”

“The issues that we encountered with Shareworks are very frustrating. And while it was a successful listing (we pulled off the near impossible in getting the company listed and out in less than 6 months) it was blemished by Shareworks’ failure,” that email added.

A spokesperson for Palantir declined to comment on the emails. 

A spokesperson for Shareworks by Morgan Stanley told Business Insider that it had “experienced slowness that may

England lost 16,000 new coronavirus cases, blames computer glitch

The glitch was no mere rounding error in the government’s accounting, but another serious stumble at a crucial moment, when the British government is daily trying to decide where to tighten regional lockdowns to slow a second wave of the virus.

After the error was spotted and the lost cases accounted for, the government’s report of new daily infections nearly doubled — from 12,872 on Saturday to 22,961 on Sunday — sparking renewed angst among officials in London and England’s north, where most of the new cases were centered.

Michael Brodie, the interim head of Public Health England, said the issue was identified late Friday in the computer process that communicates positive results from labs to the country’s reporting dashboards. Some data files containing positive results had exceeded the maximum file size, he said, according to the BBC.

“We fully understand the concern this may cause,” Brodie added, “and further robust measures have been put in place as a result.”

While health authorities said the glitch had not affected the pandemic response at the local level, 10 Downing Street announced an investigation and politicians in the opposition Labour Party described the episode as “shambolic.”

Liverpool Mayor Joe Anderson told the Guardian newspaper the missing data was the latest in a “pandemic of incompetence from the government.”

Anderson said, “There are mistakes and there are really serious mistakes. This is a highly significant mistake that tells me the system is not fit for purpose.”

Paul Hunter, a professor of health protection at the University of East Anglia, told BBC Radio, “I think the thing that surprised me was the size of it — almost 16,000 results — going missing over the course of a week is quite alarming, I think.”

Hunter said for contact tracing to effective, people who were in