Bill Gates Learned at an Early Age This Lesson That Takes Most People a Lifetime. Some People Never Do

You can say what you want about Bill Gates, but it would be hard to argue that he hasn’t experienced success. He’s one of the wealthiest people on earth, having co-founded one of the world’s most valuable companies. He now spends his time giving away all of that money to causes like eradicating polio. His is not a bad resume. 

A lot of that accomplishment comes from a simple lesson Bill Gates learned early on in his life. I think it’s worth looking at, especially since it’s something many people take a lifetime to learn, if they ever do at all.

Most of us assume that it is, which means everything that isn’t success must be failure. But the opposite of success isn’t failure. Or, it doesn’t have to be. And, that’s a distinction that can make all the difference. Unfortunately, it’s one that many people never learn to make.

Most people measure success by whatever the equivalent is in their job of shooting an arrow and hitting the center of the target. There’s very little margin for error: you either hit it or you didn’t. If that’s the case, everything else is a failure. That belief is often what makes us afraid to try, because success is narrowly defined as only the best possible outcome. 

In most cases, though, success is incremental. You try something and it works, you take a step forward. You try something else, and it doesn’t work, so you learn something and look for more things like the first attempt. Eventually, you get to wherever you were headed.

This brings up another reason success isn’t binary: in many cases, it’s impossible to understand the best possible outcome. In fact, there are a lot of things that don’t qualify as a “success,” but shouldn’t be defined

Legendary tech investor Bill Gurley says today’s markets remind him of the dot-com bubble



Bill Gurley wearing a suit and tie: Reuters


© Reuters
Reuters

  • Legendary tech investor Bill Gurley told CNBC on Friday that the stock market reminds him of the late ’90s dot-com bubble. 
  • “There is certainly what I would call a highly speculative nature to the markets today, a willingness to take on risks, a willingness to get excited about projects that may be five or 10 years in the future,” the Benchmark partner said. 
  • Other investors like Stanley Druckenmiller have drawn similar conclusions about today’s technology stocks. 

Legendary venture capitalist Bill Gurley told CNBC on Friday that the stock market reminds him of the late-1990s tech trading environment that led to the dot-com bubble.

“There is certainly what I would call a highly speculative nature to the markets today, a willingness to take on risks, a willingness to get excited about projects that may be five or 10 years in the future, that we haven’t seen since the ’99 time frame,” the Benchmark partner said. 

He added: “I really can’t speculate or know exactly what it was, or the confluence of events that led to that, but we are living in a more speculative technology market for sure.” 

Video: Cloud stocks soar as Citi analysts upgrade Workday. Traders on whether they can keep climbing (CNBC)

Cloud stocks soar as Citi analysts upgrade Workday. Traders on whether they can keep climbing

UP NEXT

UP NEXT

Read more: MORGAN STANLEY: Buy these 16 stocks to cheaply invest in next-generation technologies and reap the future profits they generate

Loading...

Load Error

Other investors have echoed these concerns about frenzied traders pushing technology stocks into dangerously high territories. The top five tech stocks — Microsoft, Apple, Amazon, Alphabet, and Facebook — make up nearly a quarter of the S&P 500. 

Billionaire investor Stanley Druckenmiller said in September that the market was in

You can now lower your AT&T bill with mix-and-match wireless plans

If you’re with any major US phone carrier other than Verizon, you’ll know you couldn’t mix and match phone plans between different lines on your account. Starting today, AT&T is finally allowing customers to mix and match which unlimited plan they choose and potentially save some money on their phone bill each month, with a program it’s calling Unlimited Your Way.



background pattern


© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


For instance, if previously your parents were looking for more hotspot data or a bundled subscription to HBO Max, they would likely have chosen the Unlimited Elite plan, and pay $50 each for four lines (or $200 a month) for a family of four. With mix and match, those parents can choose an Unlimited Elite plan for themselves and put two kids on the cheaper Unlimited Starter plan, saving $30 a month on their phone bill.

Loading...

Load Error

Now that AT&T and Verizon both offer mix and match plans, T-Mobile is the odd one out

AT&T’s three unlimited wireless plans — Unlimited Elite, Unlimited Extra, and Unlimited Starter — remain the same as last year, including how much they cost, as you can see from the charts below. Each offers unlimited talk, text, and 5G access if your phone is compatible with the network. While similar, the plans differ depending on how much premium data you want and what quality of streaming is available for your phone, with only Elite letting you stream HD video.



timeline


© Image: AT&T


Now that AT&T and Verizon both offer mix and match plans, T-Mobile is the odd one out. But even though it doesn’t have a similar program, Magenta and Magenta Plus customers can pay for “PlusUp” if they need more data. It adds up to 20GB of data and unlimited HD streaming at an