Appify Announces Launch of No-Code Appify Marketplace, Plus Two Premium Apps for Field Service and Field Sales

Appify (formerly Turbo Systems), the fast-growing no-code platform for business apps, today announced the launch of the Appify Marketplace, where companies of all sizes can access, customize and deploy new apps in minutes to automate critical tasks and better serve customers across their businesses.

Appify is kicking off the launch of the Marketplace by offering two premium Apps to help transform the experience of mobile field workers. With Appify Field Service and Appify Field Sales premium apps, companies can deploy apps to help their field teams manage work orders, assets, inventory, quotes, customer and contact information; or to generate project bids from wherever they’re engaging with customers or prospects, in minutes.

These latest enhancements to the Appify suite have allowed mid-market businesses like Modesto Irrigation District to increase efficiency significantly as crews can handle more jobs through better visibility. Partners Tech Services, ATM servicing for Diebold and other ATM manufacturers, saw similar advantages from moving their paper-based process to Appify, each field worker has gotten back at least an hour per day in efficiency gains when using the Appify Field Service app.

GDT Repair, a family-owned business that helps restaurants keep their equipment running and whose clients include big-name restaurant chains like Applebee’s, Panera Bread and Tim Hortons now uses Appify Field Service to cut back hours typically spent on manual paperwork. In addition, the app allows them to reduce its time to deliver invoices from 15 days to five minutes leading to increased cash flow for the business.

“Before Appify Field Service, all repair technicians would capture details of work onsite with paper, take pictures on their phones and didn’t have access to customer data,” said President of GDT Repair, Blake Tarana. “But with this new Appify App, we can now easily create and manage jobs on a mobile

Spotify threatening developers over apps that transfer playlists to other services

Developers who provide the ability to transfer Spotify playlists to Apple Music, or other services, are reportedly being told their access to the Spotify SDK will be revoked.

As it continues to say Apple “threatens our collective freedoms to listen, create, and connect,” Spotify has allegedly begun notifying developers that they can no longer transfer playlists to other services. SongShift reports that it has been told to cease such transfers or risk losing access to the Spotify SDK.

“The Spotify Developer Platform Team reached out and let us know we’d need to remove transferring from their service to a competing music service or have our API access revoked due to TOS [terms of service] violation,” announced SongShift in a blog post.

“While this is not the news we wanted to hear, we respect their decision,” it continued. As of the next release, SongShift v5.1.2, Spotify transfers will end. “This update is a painful one to push out to you all. We hope to continue to be of help with all your other music transferring needs.”

Spotify has yet to comment publicly, and it is unclear why it would be enforcing this contractual condition now when its developer agreement has forbidden it since at least 2018. “Do not transfer Spotify Content… to another music service that competes with Spotify or the Spotify Service,” says Spotify’s developer agreement.

However, while SongShift appears to be the only developer to have formally announced this requirement, others seem to be preparing for it. A Google search on “Spotify Transfers,” for instance, reveals a similar notice from the TuneMyMusic service — although that same notice cannot currently be found on the company’s website.

Also, similar service FreeYourMusic said on Twitter that it will continue to do so, as “we use a different method

When Your Last $166 Vanishes: ‘Fast Fraud’ Surges on Payment Apps

Charee Mobley, who teaches middle school in Fort Worth, Texas, had just $166 to get herself and her 17-year-old daughter through the last two weeks of August.

But that money disappeared when Ms. Mobley, 37, ran into an issue with Square’s Cash App, an instant payments app that she was using in the coronavirus pandemic to pay her bills and do her banking.

After seeing an errant online shopping charge on her Cash App, Ms. Mobley called what she thought was a help line for it. But the line had been set up by someone who asked her to download some software, which then took control of the app and drained her account.

“I didn’t have gas money and I couldn’t pay my daughter’s senior dues,” Ms. Mobley said. “We basically just had to stick it out until I got paid the following week.”

In the pandemic, people have flocked to instant payment apps like Cash App, PayPal’s Venmo and Zelle as they have wanted to avoid retail bank branches and online commerce has become more ingrained. To encourage that shift, the payment apps have added services like debit cards and routing numbers so that they work more like traditional banks.

But many people are unaware of how vulnerable they can be to losses when they use these services in place of banks. Payment apps have long had fraud rates that are three to four times higher than traditional payment methods such as credit and debit cards, according to data from the security firms Sift and Chargeback Gurus.

The fraud appears to have surged in recent months as more people use the apps. At Venmo, daily users have grown by 26 percent since last year, while the number of customer reviews mentioning the words fraud or scam has risen nearly

Venture Funders Flock to Religious Apps as Churches Go Online

(Bloomberg) —

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Covid-19 has upended the traditional Sunday service, taking sermons from the pulpit to the screen. It’s sparking a long overdue digital awakening for churches across the country and investors are taking notice.

The pandemic has given more people a reason to seek solace in God and faith-based communities at the same time that houses of worship were forced to close their doors. Pastors have resorted to streaming on YouTube or Facebook Live in a bid to keep congregations engaged. Membership in spiritual apps has surged. The top Christian meditation apps raked in 2.3 million downloads in the U.S. from March to August, up 325% from the same period a year earlier, according to mobile data and analytics company App Annie.

Traditionally secular venture capitalists have largely shied away from religion. In Silicon Valley, “no one wanted to touch religion five years ago” says Peter Pham, co-founder of incubator and venture fund Science Inc., which backs Pray.com. Now, “there are many avenues to tap and more companies will be born out of this growing need for a creative spiritual-digital experience — the opportunity is mind-blowing.”

The pandemic has “crystallized the opportunity,” says Brett Martin, co-founder and managing partner at Charge Ventures, an early stage venture capital firm in New York. A global shutdown accelerated tools that the tech industry was already into, like video conferencing, community building and fundraising — all of which can be applied to religion, Martin says. “Shame on the venture capital community for not recognizing the opportunity sooner.”

Some did. Pray.com, for example, was founded in 2016 and is backed by $16 million in venture funding. Now there are plenty of ways investors can get involved across all the functional areas of a church — from digital tithing to management software and virtual

Google Assistant Now Works With Android Apps

Google announced that now it’s possible to use Google Assistant with third-party apps on Android phones. So, Android users will be able to search and control their third-party apps when they ask it to Google Assistant. Google is rolling out the ability to search apps, use voice commands for popular tasks like sending text messages, ask for the news on Twitter, or browsing your shopping cart. For example, you can now say, “Hey Google, search cozy blankets on Etsy” and get right to what you’re looking for. Or if you’re looking for something (or someone) specific within an app, just say, “Hey Google, open Selena Gomez on Snapchat.” 

Previously, Google Assistant’s third-party support was largely limited to some custom actions, mostly apps that run within Assistant. With the new functionality, Google Assistant will work directly with apps that you have installed on your phone. Now, these kinds of voice commands will work with more than 30 of the top apps on Google Play. “People do a lot more with their apps beyond simply opening and searching within apps, and we want to enable voice commands to those frequent tasks, too. Now you can do things like playing music, starting a run, posting on social media, ordering food, paying back a friend, hailing a ride—the list goes on and on—all with just your voice. Starting today, you can try doing more using your voice with more than 30 of the top apps on Google Play available in English globally, with more apps coming.” Google states. 

Google Assistant brings new functionality to most common tasks as well. For your most common tasks, you can create custom shortcut phrases. So instead of saying, “Hey Google, tighten my shoes with Nike Adapt,” you can create a shortcut to just say, “Hey Google, lace it.”