Bytebase App Lets You Catalog Your Thoughts Like an Engineer

Illustration for article titled A New App Lets You Catalog Your Thoughts Like an Engineer

Screenshot: ByteBase

Bytebase, a new app by two Columbia University software engineers, promises to let you store your snippets, thoughts, and notes in a way that is instantly searchable and automatically organized.

Created by ex-Twilio engineer Cara Borenstein and ex-Nextdoor engineer Theo Marin, the barebones web app is sort of like Evernote amped up on the drug from Limitless.

Explaining how the app works is actually kind of difficult. Like any other note-taking system, you enter data and paste in code, text, or whatever you want to save. You can share it with others and create separate notebooks for each project. More important, each note can act as a link to another note, allowing you to nest information within other pieces of information. To use it, you simply paste in code snippets and text into the “No Man’s Land” area and then move it into separate projects later. You can also make outlines and to-do lists in the app.

Each one of those lines can act as another separate note.

Each one of those lines can act as another separate note.
Screenshot: ByteBase

A feed lets you send notes, called bytes, to co-workers within Bytebase. Because the co-founders are coders, they’ve also added clever keyboard shortcuts that will be familiar to Vim and Emacs users. You can also add large text chunks called BigBytes.

“As a software engineer, it was challenging to get the information I needed to do my job. The information was supposed to be on the wiki, but it wasn’t,” said Borenstein. “So we went back to the drawing board and invested in more user research. We knew that people weren’t really using wikis to their potential, but they were collaborating. We wanted to figure out what it was that they were already doing and see if

Farming assistant app Agrolly wins IBM’s Call for Code contest

The innovative platform will be a one-stop-shop for farmers seeking out more information on what to plant and when.

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An autonomous combine–again, smaller and lighter than conventional farm machinery–harvesting HFHa’s first crop in September 2017.

Image: HandsFree Hectare

Agrolly, a platform built to help farmers in emerging markets, was chosen as the winner of IBM’s 2020 Call for Code Global Challenge.

Agrolly provides farmers with a bevy of information about weather patterns and crop characteristics, giving them advice on what would be the best thing to plant during certain times of the year. The platform also has ways for farmers to connect with experts as well as ways for them to share information and tools with each other.

During the virtual “2020 Call for Code Awards: A Global Celebration of Tech for Good” event, Agrolly was announced as the winner of the annual competition, which brings together the world’s brightest minds to create solutions to pertinent problems. This year’s task was to develop solutions to problems related to climate change and COVID-19.

“Climate change is making it worse for farmers in developing countries and they are losing yield production because of the changes. When you come to emerging markets and you look at these farmers, they don’t have the resources, they don’t know what to plant, they don’t know what the weather will be, and they don’t have advantages,” said Manoela Morais, CEO of Agrolly.

SEE: Big data’s role in COVID-19 (free PDF) (TechRepublic)

“We want to change the farming industry in the long run by listening to these small farmers in emerging markets, giving them a voice, and empowering them with the latest tech available. We wanted to create an ecosystem where they can contact each other, solve their problems and build a system that is better in the

App Allowing Chinese Citizens Access to Global Internet Quickly Disappears | Voice of America

WASHINGTON – A mobile app launched last week in China that many there hoped would allow access to long banned Western social media sites abruptly disappeared from Chinese app stores a day after its unveiling.

Tuber, an Andriod app backed by Chinese cyber security software giant Qihoo 360, first appeared to be officially available last Friday. It offered Chinese citizens limited access to websites such as YouTube, Facebook and Google, and it facilitated some 5 million downloads following its debut.

Yet a day later, the Tuber app disappeared from mobile app stores, including one run by Huawei Technologies Co. A search for the app’s website yielded no results when VOA checked Monday. It’s unclear whether the government ordered the takedown of the app.

Experts told VOA that such ventures are sometimes designed to create the illusion of choice to users eager to gain access to the global internet, but these circumvention tools are sometimes deleted if they are deemed by the Chinese government to be too popular with consumers.

FILE PHOTO: The messenger app WeChat is seen next to its logo in this illustration picture taken Aug. 7, 2020.

Short-lived frenzy

Chinese users hailed their newfound ability to visit long banned websites before the app was removed last Saturday.

Several now banned articles introducing Tuber went viral Friday on China’s super app WeChat and seem to have contributed to Tuber’s overnight success.

Sporting a logo similar to that of YouTube, Tuber’s main page offered a feed of YouTube videos, while another tab allowed users go to Western websites banned in China.

A reporter at Chinese state media Global Times tweeted that the move is “good for China’s stability and it’s a great step for China’s opening up.”

ProjX360 CEO Touts App Updates, Business Software Benefits

Some of the most innovative products for the custom industry come from the minds of custom integrators not coincidentally. They do, after all, have first-hand experience knowing their own and presumably others’ needs and pain points.

Also, unsurprisingly, many of these companies sprout up in the business operations/management sector, because there are always going to be opportunities to help owners run their businesses smarter and more efficiently.

Such is the case with Doug Greenwald, who created management software ProjX360 but also is CEO of Creative Sound & Integration in Scottsdale, Ariz. – a winner in this year’s CE Pro Home of the Year Awards program in the Best New Technologies project category.

Greenwald chatted with CE Pro about ProjX360’s CEDIA Expo Virtual booth (still accessible at projx360.cediaexpovirtual.com) in September and the importance of business management software in general.

What were some of your takeaways from the CEDIA Expo Virtual platform experience? 

It was nice to interact with new dealers [for the first time on a large scale] since the start of COVID. One thing I can say is that it doesn’t replace meeting in person and can’t wait until next year when CEDIA [Expo] returns.

How did ProjX360 conduct interactions with attendees? 

So we did two live demonstrations each day and my on-boarding and training director was meeting with existing customers to answer questions and go through best workflow practices of the software. We also had our live chat going and we allowed dealers to request personal one-on-one meetings with us

What was ProjX360 focused on sharing with attendees in terms of new features to the software platform? 

We spoke about our new updated App for iOS and Android that will be coming out in the next few weeks with offline time tracking, push notifications, and easy access to

Top 5 programming languages for mobile app developers to learn

These languages will help current and new mobile application developers navigate the programming landscape to code apps that are stable, secure, and compatible with modern mobile architectures.

Mobile app developer

Image: iStock/RossHelen

As I have said previously, I’m no fan of programming or app development. I don’t find myself to be very good at it, but I am truly in awe of what can be accomplished with properly written applications, especially when the applications leverage network and cloud-based technologies to provide enhanced functionality and reporting capability while offering cross-platform support.

Must-read developer content

SEE: Listen to TechRepublic’s Dynamic Developer podcast (TechRepublic)

There are colleagues of mine who have always shown this ability to tap into a program’s APIs to create helpful dashboards that can be rolled into mobile apps, allowing them to keep tabs of a number of systems or an entire site—all from their smartphones—including integrated push notifications to alert them of potential issues in real time. All this can be created by their hands using software development tools and a little coding know-how.

For those who share my colleagues’ skills—or wish to—I have collected the top five programming languages for mobile app developers to learn, allowing you to create modern applications that run natively on specific operating systems and hardware types. Or they can be made software/hardware agnostic by creating them as web-based apps and hosted from a web server to run on any supported browser.

Java

Since its inception, Java has been the language of choice for mobile app development centered around Google’s Android platform. Java is a highly popular programming language that allows for cross-platform support and ease of portability when creating apps for multiple OSes and hardware types. There’s a saying that Java applications are Write Once Run Anywhere (WORA), since this code can be expected to run