Apple to Allegedly Rekindle ‘MagSafe’ Brand for Magnetic iPhone Case and Wireless Charging Accessories

A Chinese Weibo account going by the name “Kang” this morning posted allegedly accurate information for every product set to be announced at the upcoming Apple event on October 13, including details and launch dates for the full iPhone 12 lineup, and the rumored HomePod mini.

In addition, the original post also claims that Apple will announce a new magnetic iPhone case with “MagSafe” and two official Apple wireless chargers called “MagSafe Charger” and “MagSafe Duo Charger,” one or both of which will have a 15-Watt power output.


The “MagSafe” brand name will resonate with readers who remember Apple’s magnetically attached MagSafe power connector, which first appeared on MacBook Pro models in 2006 but despite its popularity was eventually discontinued across all Apple product lines between 2016 and 2019 and replaced with USB-C.

Back in August, images shared on Weibo that were said to be from the ‌iPhone 12‌ depict a circular array of magnets in the body of the device. The leak was met with speculation that the magnets could be for alignment purposes should Apple release its own wireless charger.


EverythingApplePro, who shared the images on Twitter, also posted an image of an alleged iPhone 12 case with a similar array of magnets built in, which he suggested are “likely for perfect alignment with Apple’s wireless chargers.”

For months ahead of their unveiling, last year’s iPhone 11 series was rumored to feature a Qi-based device-to-device charging feature, allowing for an Apple Watch, AirPods, and other accessories to charge on the back of the iPhones. The feature was expected to be similar to Wireless PowerShare on Samsung’s Galaxy S10. According to Ming-Chi Kuo, however, the feature was abandoned because the charging efficiency did not meet Apple’s requirements.

As it stands, Apple hasn’t released any native wireless chargers for ‌iPhone‌.

The Science Femme Was Allegedly a White Male Professor Who Posed as Woman of Color and Bullied Women

“The Science Femme” claimed to be a female academic. She claimed to have upended efforts by her social justice-obsessed department to draft a statement condemning racism.

And when Twitter users accused her of racism, she claimed to be a woman of color herself—and an immigrant to boot.

But The Science Femme, who tweeted from the handle @piney_the, wasn’t any of those things, digital sleuths began alleging late last month. Instead, they claimed, “she” was Craig Chapman, a white male assistant professor of chemistry at the University of New Hampshire. The allegations, bolstered by an internal chemistry department email, would make Chapman at least the fourth white academic revealed to have posed as a person of color in recent weeks.

In three of those cases, academics are accused of shamelessly trying to further their own careers. But in Chapman’s case, Twitter users who came into contact with @piney_the say the account harassed real women working in science.

The University of New Hampshire said the incident was under investigation.

“UNH was recently made aware of allegations on social media about a member of its faculty,” a spokesperson told The Daily Beast. “We are deeply troubled by what we’ve learned so far and immediately launched an investigation. The employee at the center of allegations on social media is on leave and not in the classroom. In order to protect the integrity of the ongoing investigation the university is unable to comment further.”

Chapman did not return repeated requests for comment for this story. Both his account and @piney_the were deleted last week.

Susanna Harris, a microbiology Ph.D. holder who currently works in science communications, first noticed the @piney_the Twitter account in July.

“They put out this huge long thread about how they, as a woman of color in science, a professor, made a

TikTok competitor Triller found allegedly inflating its user numbers

Would-be TikTok competitor Triller has allegedly inflated its monthly active user numbers, according to a report published in Business Insider.

In the last month Triller — a short-form video app that has attracted a number of TikTok stars, including the most popular person on the platform, Charli D’Amelio — announced that it had more than 100 million monthly active users. Speaking to Business Insider, six former employees dispute those numbers, and they told reporter Dan Whateley that Triller’s numbers were shady, based on their experience with the company.

Back in October of last year, Triller said it had reached 13 million monthly active users and 60 million app downloads. A screenshot provided to Business Insider of one of the company’s analytics dashboards, however, shows a different story — only 2 million monthly active users on iOS and around 484,000 monthly active users on Android. It was taken just a few weeks after the company’s public announcement.

“Four of the six former Triller employees Business Insider spoke with confirmed that they had access to the Localytics dashboard and remembered Triller’s MAU count ranging between 1 million to 2.5 million at the time,” wrote Whateley in his story. “The other two said they remembered the MAU count being about that 1-2.5 million range at the time, but did not name Localytics in particular.”

Triller provided a statement to Business Insider, which said that the former employees were “disseminating inaccurate information.”

Meanwhile, the third-party mobile analytics firm Apptopia estimated that Triller had only 52 million lifetime installs this August — a number that’s vastly different than the company’s 250 million. That time, Triller threatened to sue over the difference. Lately, Triller has been