Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science | News

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning landscape,

Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning landscape, Tufts provides students with a collaborative, community-based environment to meet industry’s rapidly-expanding need for innovative team members with advanced analytical capabilities.”

“Noodle is thrilled to continue our support for Tufts, and we are honored to play a role  in realizing Tufts’ commitment to expand its excellent engineering education to the online realm,” Lee Bradshaw, Chief

Yelp Will Add Racist Behavior Tags to Business Pages

Illustration for article titled Yelp Will Now Advise Customers When a Business Is Racist Enough to Land in the News

Screenshot: Yelp

Yelp will now warn customers that they’re looking at a “business accused of racist behavior”—just so long as it’s been racist enough to warrant a mention in the news.

The review platform announced in a blog post Thursday that it will place an alert on a business page when a business “gains public attention” such as a news article documenting “egregious, racist actions from a business owner or employee, such as using overtly racist language or symbols.” Previously, Yelp implemented a “Public Attention Alert” feature that informed visitors that a business may be at the center of a controversy involving racism, but that alert didn’t specify whether the business was the source of the bigoted behavior or the target.

“As the nation reckons with issues of systemic racism, we’ve seen in the last few months that there is a clear need to warn consumers about businesses associated with egregious, racially-charged actions to help people make more informed spending decisions,” VP of user operations Noorie Malik wrote in the post. “Now, when a business gains public attention for reports of racist conduct, such as using racist language or symbols, Yelp will place a new Business Accused of Racist Behavior Alert on their Yelp page to inform users, along with a link to a news article where they can learn more about the incident.”

That’s a pretty high bar for restricting the page—reporters aren’t out there running down every business flying a Confederate flag. Yelp also said it was hoping to rein in review-bombing, in which large numbers of users who may have no personal experience with a business leave negative reviews in response to a well-publicized incident. The new version of the popup tells users that while Yelp believes racism is “reprehensible

Apple made ProtonMail add in-app purchases, even though it had been free for years

On Tuesday, Congress revealed whether it thinks Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google are sitting on monopolies. In some cases, the answer was yes.

But also, one app developer revealed to Congress that it — just like WordPress — had been forced to monetize a largely free app. That developer testified that Apple had demanded in-app purchases (IAP), even though Apple had approved its app without them two years earlier — and that when the dev dared send an email to customers notifying them of the change, Apple threatened to remove the app and blocked all updates.

That developer was ProtonMail, makers of an encrypted email app, and CEO Andy Yen had some fiery words for Apple in an interview with The Verge this week.

We’ve known for months that WordPress and Hey weren’t alone in being strong-armed by the most valuable company in the world, ever since Stratechery’s Ben Thompson reported that 21 different app developers quietly told him they’d been pushed to retroactively add IAP in the wake of those two controversies. But until now, we hadn’t heard of many devs willing to publicly admit it. They were scared.

And they’re still scared, says Yen. Even though Apple changed its rules on September 11th to exempt “free apps acting as a stand-alone companion to a paid web based tool” from the IAP requirement — Apple explicitly said email apps are exempt — ProtonMail still hasn’t removed its own in-app purchases because it fears retaliation from Apple, he says.

He claims other developers feel the same way: “There’s a lot of fear in the space right now; people are completely petrified to say anything.”

He might know. ProtonMail is one of the founding partners of the Coalition for