Boost Sport raises $1.3M to help basketball teams win more games with video analysis tech

Boost Sport CEO Mustafa Abdul-Hamid. (Boost Sport Photo)

Boost Sport, a Seattle startup that helps basketball teams analyze their performance with video analysis technology, raised a $1.3 million seed round.

Founded in 2016, the company uses machine learning and artificial intelligence that lets coaches and trainers pull data insights from video footage without having to purchase in-venue camera systems and wearable devices. Boost says its software can help spot trends and surface opportunities about strategy and personnel.

TitletownTech, a partnership between the Green Bay Packers and Microsoft, led the round. Other investors include Portfolia, Stadia Ventures, Barbara Clarke at the ImpactSeat, and Scott Cannon.

“With the ever-changing landscape in sports, technology that can create efficient data channels for coaches and teams will be even more important,” Cordero Barkley, partner at TitletownTech, said in a statement. “Boost is positioned to become a significant asset for coaches, conferences and leagues.”

Boost is led by Mustafa Abdul-Hamid, a former pro basketball player who previously co-founded My90, and Inga Nakhmanson, an augmented reality and computer vision expert who co-founded AR Door and Fitting Reality.

Abdul-Hamid said the company ran five pilots last season and recently signed Pepperdine as a customer. Revenue has been affected by the pandemic, but Boost is signing 2-year contracts, he noted.

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Portland-based hardware security startup Eclypsium raises $13M

Yuriy Bulygin, co-founder and CEO, Eclypsium (Eclypsium Photo)

Portland, Ore.-based startup Eclypsium raised $13 million to help expand its enterprise hardware security technology.

Founded in 2017, the company helps detect, analyze, and prevent security threats at the firmware level.

Eclypsium is led by co-founder and CEO Yuriy Bulygin, a former top engineer at Intel and founder of the CHIPSEC project. He started the company with CTO Alex Bazhaniuk, another former Intel security engineer.

“The ongoing and material shift to remote work has brought new risks from remote and BYOD devices and remote access infrastructure,” Bulygin said in a Bulygin. “Traditional software security solutions don’t provide visibility into the firmware risks these devices bring to an organization. We have built world-class expertise and technology, in partnership with our customers, to address the firmware risk.”

New backers AV8 Ventures, TransLink Capital, Mindset Ventures, Alumni Ventures Group, and Ridgeline Partners invested in the round, which included participation from existing investors Intel Capital, Madrona Venture Group, Andreessen Horowitz, and Ubiquity Ventures. Total funding to date is $25 million.

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