When frequent political candidate Chris Young died, he left behind a valuable campaign website

He also left behind a something that no one could have predicted would suddenly become so valuable: his campaign website, wheretovote.com.

The domain, which his wife now owns, used to redirect users to Young’s Facebook page, and is now broken. But in a year where the coronavirus pandemic has created so much uncertainty around voting in next month’s election, political strategists say it’s a shame that a website that could have been used for a good cause – like encouraging people to vote – is blank. And they say a sale of the domain could have fetched a small fortune from advocacy groups or even candidates for office.

“It’s common practice to direct multiple sites like this one to a voter information platform,” said Michael Halle, a former senior advisor to Pete Buttigieg’s presidential campaign. “It would be great to have this one in the arsenal.”

Unlike the conventional candidate who purchases a campaign website with his or her name in the URL – current Providence Mayor Jorge Elorza uses ElorzaforMayor.com, for example – Young created wheretovote.com on March, 6, 2002, according to domain records. He ran for Providence mayor for the first time that year.

Young initially used the URL to redirect to a GeoCities website that included campaign positions on issues like crime, taxes, education, and affordable housing. In 2006, when he attempted to run for US Senate, lieutenant governor, and mayor all at the same time, the website included an American flag background and the slogan, “Campaign for Justice.” In more recent years, he used his campaign website to advocate for taxing Brown University and posted pictures of his wife and daughter.

Young, who described himself as an electrical engineer and media consultant, remained a fierce anti-abortion advocate right up to his death. He died while driving

Half of young women will leave their tech job by age 35, study finds

gettyimages-1163568484

Young women in tech aren’t staying in the industry. 


Getty Images

Half of young women who go into tech jobs leave by age 35, according to a report out Tuesday from IT consulting firm Accenture and tech education organization Girls Who Code. 

The primary reason? Noninclusive company culture. Thirty-seven percent of respondents who said they’d left the industry listed this as their reason for leaving. 

The study, called Resetting Tech Culture, gathered information from 1,990 tech workers and 500 senior human resources leaders in companies employing people in technology jobs. It also gathered info from 2,700 college students. 

This type of attrition, the report says, is a blow to an industry that’s already struggling with a lack of diversity, with the proportion of women actually declining in the last three decades.

“[Women] have actually fallen further behind at the very moment when tech roles are surging and vital to the U.S. economy and its continued leadership around the globe,” the report says. 

The study comes at a time when tech companies have faced increased scrutiny over the demographic imbalances in their workforces. Big names like Google, Facebook, Apple, Microsoft and others release diversity reports every year showing incremental progress. Despite investing time, money and PR into corporate diversity efforts, tech companies like Uber are still plagued with reports of workplace discrimination and the like.

The report also comes as more than 30,000 women are expected to gather virtually this week for the Grace Hooper Celebration, a 20-year-running conference devoted to supporting women in technology. 

Accenture and Girls Who Code also found that a disparity exists between how senior HR leaders at companies and women themselves perceive the