Here’s Doom running on a Samsung fridge thanks to xCloud

I’m fairly sure cars were supposed to be flying by now, but instead we’ve managed something else that would have felt like science fiction a decade ago: playing Xbox games on your fridge. That’s right, someone has managed to get Microsoft’s xCloud service running on a Samsung smart fridge.

Instagram user Richard Mallard has managed this feat of modern engineering, sideloading the Android version of the Xbox Game Pass app onto his fridge. The app runs in portrait mode on Samsung’s smart fridge, but games appear at the correct aspect ratio alongside cheese, beers, and whatever other essentials you store in a fridge.

Keeping with the tradition of running Doom games on unusual hardware, Mallard picked Doom Eternal, a modern installment in the series. We’ve even seen Doom running inside Minecraft recently. Doom Eternal is also the first first game to arrive on Xbox Game Pass following Microsoft’s acquisition of ZeniMax.

While xCloud running on a smart fridge is certainly amusing, it also means Microsoft’s game streaming service is available on a fridge before it’s launched on an iPad or iPhone. Apple has been blocking services like xCloud and Stadia from iOS and iPadOS, but the company did offer an olive branch recently which would mean Microsoft and others would be able to package cloud games into separate apps on the App Store.

It’s a ridiculous restriction that doesn’t exist on Android, allowing xCloud to run across a variety of handsets, tablets, and now smart fridges. Microsoft wasn’t impressed with Apple’s recent cloud gaming policy changes, and the company is now pressing ahead with a web version to bypass Apple’s restrictions. During a recent all-hands meeting at Microsoft, Xbox chief Phil Spencer revealed a “direct browser-based solution” for xCloud will be available in early 2021. He didn’t mention smart

xCloud is an unfinished but inspiring glimpse of how we might game in the future

The first time you boot up an Xbox One game on an Android phone can be surreal. Earlier this month, I opened the Game Pass app on a Pixel 3A phone, connected an Xbox One controller via Bluetooth in the device settings, and tapped the “play” button on the page for Halo 5: Guardians. After a somewhat lengthy loading time, there I was on the menu screen, ready to play the exact same Halo 5 campaign that I left unfinished back in 2016.

It surprised me that my save file was intact and accessible in the cloud, letting me pick up right where I left off. The best part: I didn’t even have to unpack the Xbox One where I originally played the game. It’s sitting unplugged in a box, exactly where I left it since moving back to the East Coast at the end of the summer.

I dropped into Halo 5 and began playing once again, the lag a bit noticeable but not game-breaking and the graphics sharp enough for playing on a small Pixel screen. With a $15-a-month Game Pass subscription and a $15 PowerA MOGA controller clip, I now have a comfortable mobile game console I can play anywhere in my apartment — with Halo 5 and dozens of other games, including ones I never owned and some I wasn’t even aware of. It feels like having a work-in-progress version of the future playing out on my phone.

The ease with which Microsoft’s new cloud gaming beta slots into its existing Game Pass service and broader Xbox vision obscures the fact that xCloud is very much a rough draft. It’s a very early version of the kind of state-of-the-art platform the company will

Microsoft reportedly bringing Project xCloud to iOS via internet browsers in 2021

Project xCloud, as shown at the Xbox E3 Showcase in the Microsoft Theater at L.A. Live, Sunday, June 9, 2019 in Los Angeles. (Photo by Casey Rodgers/Invision for Xbox/AP Images)

Several sources reported this week that Microsoft is working on a browser-based edition of its cloud gaming service Project xCloud. Business Insider reported that Xbox chief Phil Spencer told Microsoft employees at a meeting Wednesday that the company will pursue a “direct browser-based solution” for bringing the Xbox Game Pass to Apple’s family of devices.

If this were to work similarly to features on other services such as Google Stadia, it would allow Game Pass subscribers to connect to xCloud’s servers on an Apple device via its web browser, rather than launching any kind of discreet individual app. It would work identically to how one logs into any other streaming service, such as Netflix or Hulu, in a browser window.

This news comes almost a month after Apple launched a new set of rules for its App Store in September. It would have allowed Microsoft to officially bring an xCloud app to iOS, but only if each game on the service was submitted to Apple as a separate playable app. As there are dozens of games on the Game Pass at any given time and they rotate in and out of the service monthly, this was essentially a case of Apple setting up a logistically-infeasible series of hoops for Microsoft to jump through. Naturally, Microsoft opted to decline.

According to Apple, this was done to make sure that Microsoft’s library of games on the Pass all individually meet Apple’s stringent guidelines for the App Store. According to everyone else, it’s another case this year of Apple using its policies as a weapon against competitors. If xCloud (and Stadia) was available

Microsoft is bringing xCloud to iOS via the web

Microsoft is working on a “direct browser-based solution” to bring xCloud to iOS early next year. Sources familiar with Microsoft’s plans tell The Verge that the company has been developing a web version of xCloud to run on iOS and iPadOS devices, alongside continuing its work on an app that it hopes will also eventually run on Apple’s platform.





Microsoft’s gaming chief, Phil Spencer, revealed the company’s browser-based xCloud work during a recent internal all-hands meeting. “We absolutely will end up on iOS,” said Spencer during the meeting, noting that he “feels good” about the company’s iOS progress. “We’ll end up on iPhones, and iPads with Game Pass.” Business Insider first reported the news of the web version for iOS.

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Apple has been blocking services like xCloud and Stadia from running on iOS devices via its App Store, and recently offered an olive branch to these services with some big restrictions. Apple insists that developers must individually submit their games as separate apps using their streaming tech. Microsoft and Google are free to create a “catalog”-style app that collects and links out to all of these individual apps.

Microsoft wasn’t impressed with Apple’s approach, and xCloud’s potential launch on iPhones and iPads has been left in limbo as a result. We understand Microsoft is targeting an early 2021 release for a web-based version of xCloud for Apple’s devices. This browser version would bypass the App Store, just like Amazon is doing with its new Luna game streaming service.

During the same all-hands call at Microsoft, Spencer also discussed the company’s plans for xCloud on PC. Spencer described PC as a “great opportunity” for both Game Pass and game streaming. Microsoft is now aiming to bring xCloud to Windows 10 PCs in 2021. The software giant has been testing

Best XCloud Controller For Xbox Cloud Gaming On Mobile

Xbox cloud gaming launched last month with a lineup of more than 170 games. Now, anyone with an Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscription automatically has access to Xbox cloud gaming (otherwise known as Project xCloud) and can play Xbox games on their Android smartphone or tablet. However, you’ll need a phone controller if you want to experience cloud gaming, and there are a lot of different choices to consider, from official pads that require mobile controller clips to third-party ones that don’t. Thankfully, some of the best Xbox One controllers are compatible with Android devices, and there are a lot of other great cloud gaming controller options as well.

That’s why we’ve tested and identified our picks for the best xCloud controller for use for Xbox cloud gaming on our Android phones. Each of the following controllers provides a unique but great experience, and it can be hard to tell which ones are worth your time and money. If you’re looking for something akin to console and PC gaming, then there are a number of pads that provide that experience. However, there are also a couple that can turn your Android smartphone into a handheld like the Nintendo Switch, making portability easy and fun.

Quick Look: Best Phone Controller Options for Xbox Cloud Gaming

We’ll keep this article updated as we test more phone controllers, clips, and devices, but in the meantime, read on for our current overview of the best xCloud phone controllers out there. Please note that the prices listed below indicate the regular price and don’t reflect any current discounts or fluctuations. Amazon tends to discount products regularly, so you may be able to snag any of these controllers for a great price if you’re patient.