Rock Band 4, All DLC, And Many Controllers Work On PS5 And Xbox Series X

Rock Band 4 the game, all of its DLC, and the previously released plastic instruments you might have already will work on the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X.

Developer Harmonix confirmed this in a blog post, stating that all of this will work on day one when the consoles release in November. Harmonix couched its statement with phrases and words like “we believe” and “should” because it cannot guarantee compatibility in all cases for all instruments.

Electronic drum kits and their various adapters should work as well, Harmonix said. In terms of DLC songs, all of them will work on the PS5 and Xbox Series X. Additionally, save data carries forward, but only on the same console family.

You can see a rundown of supported controllers below, but note that it is not a comprehensive list.

Rock Band 4 on PS5 and Xbox Series X will be a better experience, too, Harmonix said. There will be a “sizable performance increase” on the next-gen consoles, with the developer calling out load times in particular as an example of how Rock Band 4 will perform better.

“Both the new Xbox and PlayStation consoles are on par with each other when it comes to load times. Impressive across the board,” Harmonix said.

Harmonix also clarified that there will be cross-gen multiplayer support, but only between the same console family.

On PS5, the situation is slightly more complicated when it comes to compatibility for some devices. The PS5’s new DualSense controller has a built-in microphone, and the system will default to this. So singers who want to use a USB microphone will need to change that in the system settings.

Rock Band 4 Compatible Controllers For PS5 and Xbox Series X

  • Mad Catz RB4 Fender Stratocaster Guitar (Xbox)
  • Mad Catz RB4 Drums (Xbox)

Xbox Series X And S Preorder Guide: Console Preorders Sold Out, Accessories Still Available

Next month sees the release of two brand-new Xbox consoles, and retailers are already sold out of preorders for both the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S. The Series X and Series S release November 10 for $500 and $300, respectively, and as of now, it’s proving to be quite challenging to secure either.

Where to preorder the Xbox Series X and Series S

Xbox Series X and Series S preorders were sold out at all major retailers as of our last update. Xbox preorder listings went live at Target, Walmart, Microsoft, GameStop, and other stores on September 22 but sold out as fast as they appeared. You can check the main store listings below in case of availability. In a recent tweet, Xbox urged its followers to sign up with retailers for stock updates and said more consoles will be available on release day.

Preorder Xbox Series X:

Preorder Xbox Series S:

Xbox Series X/S bundles

Preorder Xbox Wireless Controllers

The new Xbox Wireless Controllers releasing alongside the Xbox Series X and Series S are available in Carbon Black, Robot White, and Shock Blue. They feature a more ergonomic design; textured grips on the bumpers, triggers, and back case; and an Elite controller-inspired hybrid D-pad for improved precision. The updated controllers also have a new integrated Share button for capturing and recording gameplay moments.

Xbox Has Its Own Series X Twitter Hashtag Emoji Now

Part of the marketing and hype lead-up to any tech launch, now, is a bespoke Twitter hashtag emoji. And now, ahead of its November 10 launch, Xbox Series X has its own.

Microsoft has chosen a Series X over the cuter Series S for its emoji series, and the image will now be attached to several Twitter hashtags. In a Twitter thread, Xbox announced the following hashtags will carry an image of the powerful rectangular console:

  • #XboxSeriesX
  • #Xbox
  • #SeriesX
  • #PowerYourDreams
  • #PYD
  • #JumpIn
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Of course, in emoji form, the Series X is a tiny little thing–in real life, it’s quite large.

The PlayStation 5 has its own Twitter emoji too, and has for a while–it’s a little DualSense controller.

The Xbox Series X and Series S release worldwide on November 10–less than a month away. Here’s every launch title coming to the new Xbox, and GameSpot’s preorder guide for both Xbox systems.

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Xbox Series X And S Preorder Guide: More Preorders Available Tomorrow

Next month sees the release of two brand-new Xbox consoles, and retailers are already sold out of preorders for both the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S. The Series X and Series S release November 10 for $500 and $300, respectively, and as of now, it’s proving to be quite challenging to secure either.

Where to preorder the Xbox Series X and Series S

Xbox Series X and Series S preorders were sold out at all major retailers as of our last update. Xbox preorder listings went live at Target, Walmart, Microsoft, GameStop, and other stores on September 22 but sold out as fast as they appeared. You can check the main store listings below in case of availability. In a recent tweet, Xbox urged its followers to sign up with retailers for stock updates and said more consoles will be available on release day.

Reliable retailer Antonline has announced it’s opening up preorders for both Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S bundles starting tomorrow, October 13 at 11 AM PT / 1 PM ET.

Preorder Xbox Series X:

Preorder Xbox Series S:

Xbox Series X/S bundles

Preorder Xbox Wireless Controllers

The new Xbox Wireless Controllers releasing alongside the Xbox Series X and Series S are available in Carbon Black, Robot White, and Shock Blue. They feature a more ergonomic design; textured grips on the bumpers, triggers, and back case; and an Elite controller-inspired hybrid D-pad for improved precision. The updated controllers also have a new integrated Share button for capturing and recording gameplay moments.

Old Games Are New Again In These Xbox Series X Videos

Yesterday morning, I woke up to videos of Assassin’s Creed: Unity. I have to be honest, I haven’t thought much about that game in a few years: the Ps4/Xbox One launch title was pretty and ambitious, but also loaded with bugs, bloated with features and ultimately a major black eye for what was then a yearly franchise. It’s been largely forgotten as the series reinvented itself with Origins, which is why I was surprised to see this Digital Foundry video running the game at a smooth 60 FPS, many of those launch bugs long-since patched. And I’m going to be honest: I kind of want to play it.

And while I’m a whole lot less likely to play Blinx The Timesweeper, a 2002 title for the original Xbox, I can’t say that my interest wasn’t piqued by Geoff Keighley booting the thing up on the Xbox Series X and showing off an 18-year old game with 4K and HDR:

Without true next-gen exclusives yet, Microsoft’s preview program revolves around backwards compatibility and the Xbox Series X’s ability to use both more powerful hardware and AI to soup up older games, making them run better and look nicer than their original versions. It’s reflective of both how Microsoft is selling this console given that it’s not making exclusives, and of a slow shift in the gaming industry away from major leaps in graphical fidelity. We spend more time playing old games than we ever have before, and there are tons of new games designed not to take full advantage of powerful hardware but rather to work on as many devices as possible.

It’s a perspective that PC players have had for a long time: when you get a new machine, you don’t just