Employees To Get Permanent Work From Home Through Summer 2021

KEY POINTS

  • 90% employees don’t want to a rigid office schedule: Dropbox’s internal survey
  • Employees can make their own schedules in the new ‘virtual first’ policy
  • Dropbox will set up collaboration spaces called ‘Dropbox Studios’ 

Cloud services company Dropbox is allowing its employees to work from home permanently, as part of its new ‘virtual first’ approach, it announced Tuesday in a blog post.

All employees of Dropbox have been working from home since March when the pandemic triggered lockdowns. This mandatory work-from-home policy has now been extended until June 2021. The change comes after an internal survey by the company suggested that nearly 90% of employees feel productive at home and don’t want to return to a rigid five-day in-office workweek.

Dropbox is the latest to join technology companies including Microsoft, Twitter, Slack, and Facebook to announce permanent work-from-home policies.

“Remote work will be the primary experience for all employees and the day-to-day default for individual work,” Dropbox said in the blog post.

With the coronavirus pandemic upsetting the conventional work culture around the world, Dropbox is using the opportunity to introduce changes to its internal working.

In the blog post, the company said it would be changing its current offices into flexible co-working spaces — Dropbox Studios — designed especially for collaboration rather than solo work. The utilization of the co-working spaces in San Francisco, Seattle and Austin, and Dublin in Ireland, will depend on the teams’ needs. More co-working spaces could be set up if they turn out to be successful.

The company is also introducing ‘non-linear workdays,’ allowing employees to make their own schedules between time zones beyond Dropbox’s core collaboration hours. Dropbox will also facilitate employees’ relocation to other cities where it has offices.

“As our workforce grows more distributed, this will help balance collaboration with

Rock Band 4, All DLC, And Many Controllers Work On PS5 And Xbox Series X

Rock Band 4 the game, all of its DLC, and the previously released plastic instruments you might have already will work on the PlayStation 5 and Xbox Series X.

Developer Harmonix confirmed this in a blog post, stating that all of this will work on day one when the consoles release in November. Harmonix couched its statement with phrases and words like “we believe” and “should” because it cannot guarantee compatibility in all cases for all instruments.

Electronic drum kits and their various adapters should work as well, Harmonix said. In terms of DLC songs, all of them will work on the PS5 and Xbox Series X. Additionally, save data carries forward, but only on the same console family.

You can see a rundown of supported controllers below, but note that it is not a comprehensive list.

Rock Band 4 on PS5 and Xbox Series X will be a better experience, too, Harmonix said. There will be a “sizable performance increase” on the next-gen consoles, with the developer calling out load times in particular as an example of how Rock Band 4 will perform better.

“Both the new Xbox and PlayStation consoles are on par with each other when it comes to load times. Impressive across the board,” Harmonix said.

Harmonix also clarified that there will be cross-gen multiplayer support, but only between the same console family.

On PS5, the situation is slightly more complicated when it comes to compatibility for some devices. The PS5’s new DualSense controller has a built-in microphone, and the system will default to this. So singers who want to use a USB microphone will need to change that in the system settings.

Rock Band 4 Compatible Controllers For PS5 and Xbox Series X

  • Mad Catz RB4 Fender Stratocaster Guitar (Xbox)
  • Mad Catz RB4 Drums (Xbox)

Molokai slow internet causing problems for education, work

HONOLULU (AP) — Slow internet service has become an increasing problem for Molokai residents on Hawaiian Home Lands properties.

Service provided by a single telecom provider has caused difficulties for residents working at home or families engaged in distance learning, Hawaii Public Radio reported Monday.

Sandwich Isles Communication secured an exclusive license with the state Department of Hawaiian Home Lands in 1995 to bring telecom services to rural homestead communities. In return, other companies must use and pay for the Sandwich Isles infrastructure to reach customers.

Sandwich Isles founder Al Hee was convicted of federal tax fraud, served nearly four years in prison and faces nearly $50 million in fines for defrauding the U.S. government. The company was stripped of $257 million in assets.

Democratic state Rep. Lynn DeCoite, who represents Molokai, said she has received numerous complaints from homesteaders.


“Anger, frustration. You can’t even get through to a live body to talk about what the situation is, or negotiations of how they can have their bills paid, or you can transfer over to another carrier,” DeCoite said.

Hawaiian homesteader Kui Adolpho said her only option for service in Hoolehua is Sandwich Isles, but frozen screens and constant buffering are a daily ordeal for her three children taking elementary school classes at home.

Adolpho also works from home, adding to the strain on limited bandwidth.

She began an online petition to raise awareness about the problems, noting that some homesteaders have to pay for internet hot spots to obtain adequate service.

“I expected lags and, you know, the occasional interruptions. But it got to the point where my children couldn’t even get instruction at all,” Adolpho said.

Sandwich Isles said it is aware of the problems with internet speed and plans to upgrade its infrastructure.

The company also said it

Saints coach Sean Payton continues to use gadget QB Taysom Hill, and it continues to not work

If you weren’t watching football on Monday night but checked social media, you might have thought Taysom Hill and Sean Payton robbed a bank or something.

It’s really not Hill’s fault that Payton keeps using him long after the effectiveness of bringing him in as a Wildcat quarterback has worn off. But here’s what happens: The New Orleans Saints take the great Drew Brees off the field in a key spot, everyone knows Hill will run it, and they stop it. It has been a bust all season.

It happened again on Monday night. Hill came in at quarterback on a third-and-3, he ran it straight ahead and got stopped easily by the Los Angeles Chargers defense. The Saints then settled for a field goal.

And Twitter was angry, my friends.

Oh, wait. T.J. Lang’s post was from a week ago. This is an ongoing problem for the Saints and Payton.

Hill has had his moments. He’s a great athlete and good gadget player. He had a huge game in a wild-card playoff loss to the Minnesota Vikings last season. New Orleans gave him a two-year, $21 million deal this past offseason, which speaks to how the Saints overvalue him.

Hill’s usage was once a fun wrinkle, but now has become predictable and stale as Payton overused it.

And it doesn’t seem like Payton is going to stop doing it.

New Orleans Saints quarterback Taysom Hill (7) continues to get the call from Sean Payton on big downs. (AP Photo/Brett Duke)
New Orleans Saints quarterback Taysom Hill (7) continues to get the call from Sean Payton on big downs. (AP Photo/Brett Duke)

More

Top remote work tools for productivity, via GitHub, GitLab, Facebook

  • With remote work a long-term reality for many companies, tools to help employees work productively from home are critical. 
  • StackShare shared which tools are most popular on its platform, while execs from companies like Facebook, GitHub, Gitlab, and Atlassian also dished on their go-to products. 
  • It’s not just about the specific tools, though, it’s about how they’re used — including to keep company culture alive. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Because of the pandemic, remote work has become the new normal for many tech companies. 

Firms like Facebook, Twitter, and Atlassian are allowing employees to work remotely permanently, if they wish — a practice already adopted by startups like GitLab — and adapting to new productivity products in the process. It’s not just about the tools a company uses though, but also how they use them. 

StackShare, a website for companies to share what apps they use, has seen more traffic during the pandemic on its pages for remote work tools like Zoom and Google Meet. 

“The most popular tools that we’ve seen on StackShare throughout this whole pandemic have been the ones that help keep culture — help you keep that alive,”  Yonas Beshawred, founder and CEO of StackShare, told Business Insider. 

Execs from GitLab, Facebook, GitHub, and more shared the tools that they’ve been using to help employees make remote work work:

Companies are turning to video conferencing tools like Zoom and even Discord

StackShare users often look up comparisons between Google Meet and Zoom, says Yonas Beshawred, founder and CEO of StackShare.

“Zoom is really popular of course, but people have all sorts of issues with it, whether it’s security or costs,” Beshawred told Business Insider. “The fact that it’s still being compared to alternatives means there’s still demand for better video chats or video