Widex Moment vs Phonak Paradise

Both the Phonak Paradise and the Widex Moment offer all the features you’d expect from a hearing aid, including different hearing modes/profiles, a discreet design and the choice of rechargeable or 312 battery-powered (we tested rechargeable models for both). “Receiver in canal” (RIC) hearing aids are the style most people think of: a small pear-shaped unit that sits behind the ear with a tube that feeds the receiver, which then sits in the ear canal. The Paradise is currently only available as a RIC device, but the Moment is available as “completely in canal” (CIC), too, if that’s your preference. (It would be mine.)

It’s what these hearing aids offer beyond the basics that will interest those looking to add a dash of high-tech to their ears. Making hearing aids desirable consumer products can only help engage more people who need them. One statistic claims that almost 29 million Americans have enough hearing loss that they could benefit from these sorts of devices, so it’s clear there are more of us who need this technology than we apparently like to admit. Here’s a breakdown of what both offer. And note that many hearing aids have some variation on these features, but like cars, the tech that comes as standard is getting more comprehensive over time.

Hardware

Phonak Paradise

Phonak Paradise

Phonak

Like the Virto Black I wrote about in January, the Paradise has a comprehensive amount wireless tech. Notably, there’s Bluetooth, which means they not work with iOS and most Android phones for calls and music, but they can also theoretically connect to almost any Bluetooth audio source (like TVs or Phonak’s own Roger listening extender). Certain models of the Paradise also have motion sensors to detect when you’re moving or listening, which the company claims will “direct” the microphones toward the