Cyber Warriors Sound Warning On Working From Home

Cyber warriors on NATO’s eastern edge are warning that the growing number of people working from home globally due to the pandemic is increasing vulnerability to cyber attacks.

The Baltic state of Estonia hosts two cyber facilities for the Western military alliance — set up following a series of cyber attacks from neighbour Russia more than a decade ago.

“Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,” Jaak Tarien, head of NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (CCDCOE), told AFP in an interview.

The increased amount of information travelling between institutional servers and home networks is creating new challenges for employers.

'Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,' says Jaak Tarien, head of NATO's Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence ‘Large scale use of remote work has attracted spies, thieves and thugs,’ says Jaak Tarien, head of NATO’s Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence Photo: AFP / Raigo Pajula

“Tackling these new challenges is complicated and requires a lot of resources as well as a different kind of approach,” Tarien said.

“We are likely only scratching the surface in assessing the magnitude of malicious activities taking place in the Covid-era busy cyberspace.”

An EU-wide survey in September found that around a third of employees were working from home.

The NATO Cyber Range CR14 centre was set up after a series of cyber attacks on Estonian websites in 2007 The NATO Cyber Range CR14 centre was set up after a series of cyber attacks on Estonian websites in 2007 Photo: AFP / Raigo Pajula

The concerns are echoed at NATO’s Cyber Range — a heavily-guarded facility protected by barbed wire in the centre of the capital Tallinn run by Estonian defence forces.

The server rooms inside serve as a platform for NATO cyber security exercises and training.

“Specialists have set up the work infrastructure, but they cannot control the way people use their home internet or how secure it is,” said Mihkel Tikk, head of the Estonian defence ministry’s cyber policy department.

Tikk said the

Twitter slaps warning on President Trump tweet claiming coronavirus immunity

US President Trump has become subject to another fact-check warning on social media after claiming immunity to COVID-19.

In a tweet posted on Sunday, the US president claimed that physicians at the White House have given him a clean bill of health, and as a result, he is now “immune” to further infection by the novel coronavirus. 

Trump also claimed he is no longer contagious. 

See also: Twitter places public interest notice on President Trump’s tweet

“A total and complete sign off from White House Doctors yesterday,” the tweet reads. “That means I can’t get it (immune), and can’t give it. Very nice to know!!!”

After the message was published, Twitter slapped a warning label on the tweet. The microblogging platform says the tweet “violated the Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19.”

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There are currently no concrete indicators that immunity from COVID-19 is assured following infection, and if resistance is built up due to the production of antibodies, it is not possible to know if an immune response is strong enough to fight off another case of the respiratory illness. 

In a statement on Saturday, White House physician Sean Conley said that Trump was no longer considered a “transmission risk to others,” but did not disclose if the president is now testing negative.

CNET: Huawei ban timeline: UK says there’s ‘clear evidence of collusion’ between Huawei and China

While Twitter may wipe out such messages and remove profiles entirely if they are spreading fake content surrounding the pandemic, as Trump is a significant political figure, the organization has chosen to keep the tweet accessible in the public interest. 

This is not the first time the US president has fallen afoul of Twitter’s rules. In May, a tweet posted by the US president was

Facebook removes Trump post on COVID-19 while Twitter adds warning

Facebook Inc. removed a post by President Trump that suggested COVID-19 is less deadly than the seasonal flu, saying the message violated its rules about misinformation related to the virus. Twitter Inc. put a warning screen over the tweet but left it accessible for those who choose to click through to read it.

“This tweet violated Twitter Rules about spreading misleading and potentially harmful information related to COVID-19. However, Twitter has determined that it may be in the public’s interest for the tweet to remain accessible,” the warning screen reads.

Twitter has a policy to label, but not remove, violating tweets from elected officials, but the company also limited the ability to share or comment on Trump’s post.

Trump posted the message the day after returning to the White House from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, where he was treated for COVID-19. The virus has infected more than 7 million Americans and killed more than 210,000 in the U.S.

Facebook pulled the post from its network entirely. “We remove incorrect information about the severity of COVID-19, and have now removed this post,” according to a company spokesman. Facebook’s move was reported earlier by CNN.


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iPhone 12’s Sneaky Surprises, MacOS Problems, New MacBook Warning

Taking a look back at another week of news and headlines from Cupertino, this week’s Apple Loop includes a surprising iPhone 12 Mini decision, a sneaky trick in the iPhone 12 box, a MacBook warning, updates and issues with macOS, a review of the Apple Watch 6, Facebook asking for more, and goodbye to the iPod Nano.

Apple Loop is here to remind you of a few of the very many discussions that have happened around Apple over the last seven days (and you can read my weekly digest of Android news here on Forbes).

The Shrinking Storage On The New iPhones

As we wait for Apple to formally announce the iPhone 12 family (including the new ‘iPhone Mini’ branding for the entry level model), details on the storage options have come to light, and while the flagship handsets see a nice jump in specs, those looking at the cheaper models are going to be disappointed at the cost-cutting on show. Forbes’ Gordon Kelly reports:

“Prolific Apple tipster John Prosser has confirmed that Apple will double the entry level storage capacities of the iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max to 128GB, which addresses much criticized 64GB starting point in iPhone 11 Pro models. But it’s not all good news.

“While iPhone 12 Pro models will get this (long awaited) storage bump, Prosser states that the all-new iPhone 12 mini (“Definitely the final marketing name”) and iPhone 12 will be stuck with 64GB of storage. They will also have the same 64/128/256GB upgrade options as the iPhone 11 line-up, missing out on the 512GB top tier available to the iPhone 12 Pro models.”

More here on Forbes.

The iPhone, The Box, And The EarPods

As well as speculation over the launch date of the iPhone 12 family, the question

Serious Warning Issued Over $300,000 Bitcoin Stock-To-Flow Price Model

Bitcoin is on track to be one of the year’s best performing assets, despite a recent retraction—but that’s not stopped bitcoin bulls from fighting on Twitter.

The bitcoin price has climbed through much of 2020, adding some 40%, with the bullish stock-to-flow model—that predicts a massive $288,000 bitcoin price before 2024—working “like clockwork,” according to its anonymous creator.

However, a number of high-profile bitcoin analysts and entrepreneurs have clashed over the stock-to-flow model this last week, with the anonymous PlanB accusing his critics of trying to unmask him and his model derided as “absolutely useless.”

MORE FROM FORBESBitcoin And Blockchain Are The ‘Future’ Of Twitter, CEO Jack Dorsey Reveals

“The [stock-to-flow] model is based on the most fundamental errors which render it absolutely useless,” warned Alex Kruger, an economist and cryptocurrency analyst, speaking over the phone.

The stock-to-flow pricing model, created by anonymous Twitter user PlanB, who claims to be a Dutch institutional investor with a legal and quantitative finance background that manages around $100 billion in assets and tweets from the handle @100trillionUSD, calculates a ratio based on the existing supply of an asset against how much is entering circulation.

Commodities such as gold–with the largest stock-to-flow ratio of 62, meaning it would take 62 years of gold production to get the current gold stock–have a higher stock-to-flow ratio and are valued by investors for their scarcity. Silver has a stock-to-flow ratio of 22 years for its production to reach the current silver stock.

Bitcoin’s stock-to-flow ratio is now 50 following bitcoin’s third halving earlier this year, which saw the number of