Killer Mike’s majority Black and Latin-American owned online bank already has ‘tens of thousands’ on the waiting list



a man looking at the camera: Rapper Killer Mike. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images


© Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images
Rapper Killer Mike. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

  • A majority Black and Latin-American owned and operated digital bank already has “tens of thousands” of people on its waiting list ahead of its January opening, CNN Business reported. 
  • The new bank, founded by Bounce TV founder Ryan Glover, rapper “Killer Mike,” and former Atlanta Mayor and US Ambassador to the UN Andrew Young, aims to support Black and Latin-American communities, Black-owned businesses, and Black entrepreneurs. 
  • Over the past few months, companies including Square and Netflix have announced support initiatives for Black-owned financial institutions to address racial inequality. 
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A majority Black and Latin-American owned and operated online bank set to open in January already has “tens of thousands” on the waiting list seeking an account, CNN Business reported.

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Greenwood is a digital bank that was founded by Bounce TV founder Ryan Glover, rapper “Killer Mike,” and former Atlanta Mayor and US Ambassador to the UN Andrew Young that was “inspired by the early 1900’s Greenwood District, where recirculation of Black wealth occurred all day, every day, and where Black businesses thrived,” according to its website. 

Its mission statement describes how the platform is aiming to supplement “the current financial system, [which] has failed Black and Latinx communities.”

Glover told CNN Business that although Greenwood has been in the works since early last year, the killing of George Floyd that sparked nationwide movements against systemic racism also increased interest in the company. 

Gallery: The top 10 metro areas where Black and Latinx founders are securing the most funding to build their companies (Business Insider)

‘Tens of thousands’ waiting for Killer Mike’s new Black-owned bank

  • A majority Black and Latin-American owned and operated digital bank already has “tens of thousands” of people on its waiting list ahead of its January opening, CNN Business reported. 
  • The new bank, founded by Bounce TV founder Ryan Glover, rapper “Killer Mike,” and former Atlanta Mayor and US Ambassador to the UN Andrew Young, aims to support Black and Latin-American communities, Black-owned businesses, and Black entrepreneurs. 
  • Over the past few months, companies including Square and Netflix have announced support initiatives for Black-owned financial institutions to address racial inequality. 
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A majority Black and Latin-American owned and operated online bank set to open in January already has “tens of thousands” on the waiting list seeking an account, CNN Business reported.

Greenwood is a digital bank that was founded by Bounce TV founder Ryan Glover, rapper “Killer Mike,” and former Atlanta Mayor and US Ambassador to the UN Andrew Young that was “inspired by the early 1900’s Greenwood District, where recirculation of Black wealth occurred all day, every day, and where Black businesses thrived,” according to its website. 

Its mission statement describes how the platform is aiming to supplement “the current financial system, [which] has failed Black and Latinx communities.”

Glover told CNN Business that although Greenwood has been in the works since early last year, the killing of George Floyd that sparked nationwide movements against systemic racism also increased interest in the company. 

Some of the biggest companies in the US have announced support programs for Black-owned financial institutions in recent months.

In September, Square, founded by Twitter CEO Jack Dorsey, invested $100 million to address racial inequality in the financial industry. Square donated millions to funding for Black and minority-owned financial institutions and banks. In July, Netflix moved $100 million of cash reserves to minority-led

Where’s the iPhone 12, Apple? All the new Apple products we’re still waiting for

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Angela Lang/CNET

This story is part of Apple Event, our full coverage of the latest news from Apple headquarters.

Apple has announced its newest iPhone during a September media event every year since 2012’s iPhone 5. During the 2020 Apple event last month, we got new Apple Watch and iPad models, and a bundled subscription service, but no new iPhone. That shouldn’t come as a complete surprise, as a delay has been rumored for months now, and the conventional wisdom says the iPhone 12 will be announced at an October event

The iPhone isn’t the only missing-in-action update or new launch we’ve been waiting for. These are some of the things we didn’t see in September, but that might (or might not) show up before the end of the year.

What we didn’t see (yet)

iPhone 12: Everyone knows this is coming, and while it didn’t hit the September announcement window, there’s a good case to be made that the next set of iPhones will be announced on Oct. 13 or 14. The addition of 5G support is virtually a given, while other spec bumps and design changes are more up in the air. 

AirTags: This long-rumored alternative to Tile-style trackers remains a phantom product, but if it shows up before the end of the year, it could be a great reasonably priced stocking stuffer. Hints about the product have been found in some iOS code, but that’s about all we know about AirTags for now. 

Apple TV: All the TV energy seems to be going toward the Apple TV Plus service, which will now be available in the Apple One subscription bundle. But that doesn’t mean you

The Federal Government Promised Native American Students Computers and Internet. Many Are Still Waiting.

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This story was co-published with The Arizona Republic, a member of the ProPublica Local Reporting Network.

Aubrie Sloan expected to start sixth grade in a virtual classroom where she would learn from her teacher each day and engage with classmates for the first time since the coronavirus forced her school to close in March.

Instead, she marks her attendance at Kaibeto Boarding School, on the western side of the Navajo Nation, by texting or calling her teacher each morning. Then she dives into paper packets the school delivers to her home, breezing through assignments that her mother says aren’t a challenge because she already knows the material.

Aside from two phone calls from her teacher, the 11-year-old has received little instruction from the federally-operated school since classes started nearly two weeks ago.

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On Sept. 16, the first day of the academic year, Kaibeto administrators sent a letter to parents explaining that the school would not begin online classes until October. And it wouldn’t be able to distribute a computer to every student until November.

“I don’t feel like it’s quality right now,” Katinka Sloan, Aubrie’s mother, said. She added: “I know it’s not just here in Kaibeto. It’s across the board.”

The coronavirus pandemic disrupted education across the country, leaving school districts scrambling for technology to accommodate online learning. The rush caused a national backlog for computers, according to The Associated Press, which in August tallied a combined shortage of 5 million laptops among manufacturers Lenovo, Dell and