Tarrant County launches new website that allows voters to check wait times at county polling locations

Tarrant County voters can cast their ballot at any polling location for the 2020 election. The new website is color-coded based on wait times.

Tarrant County launched a new website, allowing voters to check wait times at county polling locations.

Tarrant County voters can cast their ballot at any polling location for the 2020 election. The new website is color-coded based on wait times.

At one point Tuesday morning, the website showed over an hour-long wait for the Villages of Woodland Springs polling location. That’s one of three early voting locations that was affected after a poll worker tested positive for COVID-19.

The Tarrant County Elections Office said in a statement that they found out about the poll worker’s positive test last night. That worker was trained on Oct. 8.

“Out of an abundance of caution, all workers that were in the same training class were asked to stay home and not show up for work today. This affected three early voting locations: Keller Town Hall, Villages of Woodland Springs and Euless Family Life Senior Center,” said Tarrant County Elections Administrator Heider Garcia. 

The Euless Family Life Senior Center is the only location that remained closed Tuesday morning, Garcia said. Officials are working to find a replacement crew and said they will open it as soon as possible.

Some voters that showed up to Keller Town Hall Tuesday waited hours to cast their vote.

“(The wait) is absolutely worth it,” voter Tricia Priest said. “I’m excited to cast my vote, which I wasn’t

Here’s where overseas and military voters can return ballots online

  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Reliable online voting for everyone will, in all likelihood, never be a reality, experts say. But in 2020, many states give military and overseas voters the option to transmit their absentee ballots online. 

Members of the Armed Services and their families, diplomats, and private United States citizens living abroad all have the right to vote absentee in federal elections under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA), a law first passed in the 1980s and further expanded with the MOVE Act, which was passed by Congress in 2009.

Voters covered under UOCAVA have the option to request a ballot for every election in a given year, have that ballot mailed to them no later than 45 days before the election, return it without needing to pay postage, and also have access to a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot that they can fill out if they don’t receive the requested ballot in time.

And while all voters are required to mail their ballots by Election Day, most states also give overseas and military voters

Here’s where overseas and military voters can return their ballots using the internet



Democratic party volunteers pose at an event in Rome aimed at encouraging U.S. citizens abroad to vote in the forthcoming presidential election. REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo


© REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo
Democratic party volunteers pose at an event in Rome aimed at encouraging U.S. citizens abroad to vote in the forthcoming presidential election. REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo

  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Reliable online voting for everyone will, in all likelihood, never be a reality, experts say. But in 2020, many states give military and overseas voters the option to transmit their absentee ballots online. 

Members of the Armed Services and their families, diplomats, and private United States citizens living abroad all have the right to vote absentee in federal elections under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA), a law first passed in the 1980s and further expanded with the MOVE Act, which was passed by Congress in 2009.

Voters covered under UOCAVA have the option to request a ballot for every election in a given year, have that ballot mailed to them no later than 45 days before the election, return it without needing to pay postage, and also have access to a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot that they can fill out

Fake ‘Meghan for President’ site suggests voters spoil ballots

Watch: Could Meghan Markle be US president despite being a member of the royal family?

A fake website campaigning for Meghan Markle to become president of the United States appears to be encouraging people to spoil their ballots.

Meghanforpresident.com appeared in recent days and uses pictures of the Duchess of Sussex with mottos like “together, we will lead”.

The site has been called “obviously fake” by a source close to the couple but it may concern Meghan that it encourages voters to write her name on their ballot papers.

In a blog post about ‘write-in candidates’, it shares this advice from the US government website: “Besides the names on your ballot, you may be able to write in names of other candidates. Most states let you write in votes for president, U.S. senator, and U.S. representative. They may also allow write-in votes for governor and other state offices. 

“Check with your state election office to find out the rules for your state. If you check using your state’s election website, enter “write-in candidates” in the search bar.”

It would allow people to show support for Meghan as a candidate, but it would be unlikely that with no campaigning she would garner the votes needed to be elected.

Read more: Meghan Markle says she is ‘free’ because ‘flattery and criticism go down same drain’

Meghan, Harry and Archie now live in California. (WireImage)

While the duchess has been vocal in encouraging people to vote, she has avoided naming any specific candidate she may be backing.

A source close to the couple said: “It’s obviously fake. I would encourage people not to give it more attention than it deserves – especially as it’s collecting people’s email addresses and encouraging people to spoil ballots.”

In a blog posted on the website at

‘Meghan Markle For President’ Fake Website is Asking Voters to Spoil Ballots

A fake ‘Meghan Markle for President’ website may be a voter suppression tactic as it offers voting advice that could lead supporters to spoil ballots.



a close up of Meghan Markle: Meghan Markle at the Endeavour Fund awards at Drapers' Hall on February 7, 2019 in London, England. She appears to be the victim of a voter suppression attempt by a fake website.


© Tolga Akmen/Getty
Meghan Markle at the Endeavour Fund awards at Drapers’ Hall on February 7, 2019 in London, England. She appears to be the victim of a voter suppression attempt by a fake website.

The Duchess of Sussex urged Americans to vote in the November 3 poll in a series of passionate video messages this summer leading betting companies to offer odds on a run in 2024.

However, a website has now appeared, meghanforpresident.com, claiming she is standing for the highest office in America this year under the slogan: “Together, we will lead. Vote Meghan Markle for President.”