Verizon, NMSU work together helping Columbus students access internet

LAS CRUCES – As online education becomes the new normal, many low-income families are struggling to find resources to allow their children to fully participate in classes. Nearly one-quarter of New Mexico’s students lack equipment and internet access at home.



a person standing in front of a brick building: Rosario Pando, assistant librarian of the Columbus Village Library sits at a computer in the library. Thanks to a $50,000 grant, New Mexico State University's computer science department is working with the Columbus Village Library to provide needed access to computers and internet access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.


© Courtesy photo / New Mexico State University
Rosario Pando, assistant librarian of the Columbus Village Library sits at a computer in the library. Thanks to a $50,000 grant, New Mexico State University’s computer science department is working with the Columbus Village Library to provide needed access to computers and internet access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.

As part of the National Association for Community College Entrepreneurship COVID-19 Funding and Support program in collaboration with New Mexico State University’s computer science department, a one-year, $50,000 grant will provide both access to computers and critical online access to students in Columbus, New Mexico.

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“Less than half of our homes have internet access, primarily because it’s unaffordable for our lower-income citizens,” said Maria Constantine, the director of the Columbus Village Library. “This puts families at a disadvantage for educational and employment opportunities. This program will help level the playing field for kids and families to access the resources they need to improve their lives.”

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With the grant funding, in collaboration with Constantine at the Columbus Village Library, 30 laptop computers will be purchased to loan out to students through a check out process along with Wi-Fi range extenders outside of the library, which allow students to access the internet from the parking lot.

“During our initial process, we learned that at least 50 people were accessing the internet from their vehicles,” said Adan Delval, director of the Verizon Innovation Learning Program. “During this pandemic, we

Verizon, T-Mobile launch home Internet services powered by 4G LTE networks in rural San Diego County

New 5G networks were supposed to be the battleground where wireless carriers began competing with cable and fiber providers in the home Internet market.

But with ultra-fast 5G not widely available yet, both Verizon and T-Mobile have recently rolled out home Internet services powered by their 4G LTE cellular networks.

These 4G broadband offerings aren’t promising blazing-fast speeds. But they are relatively inexpensive and target more rural areas where sluggish DSL Internet service is common.

Last week, Verizon rolled out LTE Home Internet in rural communities in 48 states. It promises download speeds of 25 megabits per second on average, with upload links at 3 to 5 megabits. It’s unlimited, meaning there are no data usage caps.

Verizon’s LTE Home costs $40 per month for people who are current Verizon Wireless customers, and $60 per month for people who aren’t. Subscribers also need to buy a $240 router, which can be purchased in monthly installments over two years.

“We built this product off of our existing 4G LTE network, and we are offering it in places where we have capacity in our network to support this kind of experience while maintaining the mobile experience that we have,” said Brian Danfield, vice president of Verizon 5G commercialization.

Verizon Wireless is offering home Internet service through its 4G LTE network.

FILE – This June 4, 2014, file photo shows signage at a Verizon Wireless retail store at Downtown Crossing in Boston. Verizon, the nation’s largest wireless provider, reports quarterly financial results on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2015. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

(The Associated Press)

LTE Home is available in areas where Verizon doesn’t offer its fiber-optic FiOS Internet service or its millimeter-wave 5G Home product. The company provided a list of zip codes where the service is available, including San Diego County backcountry communities such as Julian, Dulzura, Pala, Valley Center and Warner Springs.

“It

Verizon 4G LTE-based Home Internet maximizes rural availability edge

  • Verizon extended the availability of its 4G LTE-based Home Internet, and is now available in 189 markets
  • This allows Verizon to further capitalize on its advantage over the other major US wireless carriers in offering rural 4G.
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Verizon announced that its 4G LTE-based Home Internet service is now available in 189 markets across 48 states. In July 2020, Verizon began rolling out the service in a handful of markets across the Southeast.

4G cellular availability in remote US areas by carrier

Verizon extended the availability of its 4G LTE-based home broadband.

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The service will cost $60 per month for non-Verizon wireless customers, or $40 per month for those with Verizon mobile plans (but only if they already pay more than $30 per month). Verizon promises typical download speeds of 25–50 Mbps. 

By extending the range of services available to rural customers, Verizon can capitalize on its competitive advantage in rural service availability. Though Verizon has mostly focused until now on rolling out 5G in urban areas, it’s placed a heavy emphasis on making 4G service available for rural markets. 

According to Opensignal data collected between March 16 and June 13 of 2019, Verizon had the highest rate of 4G availability in rural regions of all the major US wireless carriers. Verizon’s advantage is more pronounced in the most rural areas: In “remote rural” areas (defined as territory that is more than 35 miles from an urbanized area) Verizon customers experienced 83.5% 4G availability, compared with 77.4% for T-Mobile, 75.5% for AT&T, and 67.3% for Sprint.

The LTE-based Home Internet service will appeal most to those in the rural US who don’t have an option for high-speed fixed broadband

Verizon Launches Unlimited 4G Home Internet for Rural Users: Here Are the Maps

(Image: Getty)

Rural home internet options in the US can be rough. If you’re not in reach of the local cable company, you’re relegated to slow DSL, or worse—cap-throttled satellite connections. While some small towns, like the ones in our 15 Small Towns with Gigabit Internet feature, have glorious connections, others struggle to get online.

Wireless phone companies have offered low-key solutions from time to time in unlimited home LTE plans. Most 4G LTE service plans, even “unlimited” ones, are capped in terms of how much you can use them as hotspots for home PCs and televisions. In some places, from time to time, each of the carriers have offered wireless internet solutions.

AT&T currently offers its rural “Fixed Wireless Internet” for $49.99/month with a 250GB monthly cap. It gives absolutely no clues as to where that’s available. BroadbandNow has a map, but doesn’t explain its sources for the data.

T-Mobile has a similar deal: $50/month home internet, but for even fewer people. According to Satellite Today, that offer is only available by invitation, or in three counties in Michigan. As part of its merger with Sprint, T-Mobile said it would cover millions of people with wireless home Internet—but not before 2024.

There are also several rather shady resellers that advertise unlimited LTE hotspots by evading the carriers’ usage limits by various means. They’re great as long as the carriers don’t crack down on them.


Verizon Rural Home Internet Maps

Last week Verizon launched its own option across the US, and its prospect is more compelling because it’s much more widely available. Verizon’s rural home LTE is truly unlimited, with speeds averaging 25Mbps, the carrier said. It costs $40/month for people with Verizon Wireless service, and $60/month for people without. You need to buy a $240 router.

Verizon’s 4G system,

Verizon expands LTE Home Internet to 48 states

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Verizon’s LTE Home Internet service is now live in parts of 48 states.


Angela Lang/CNET

Verizon has announced an expansion of its newly launched LTE Home Internet service, with the network footprint now reaching 189 regions across 48 states. As of Thursday, Verizon said, the service is available in some rural areas of every US state except Alaska and Vermont.

Verizon launched the new LTE Home service in July, aiming to bring better home internet services to people living in rural areas. It was initially launched in parts of Georgia, Missouri, Tennessee, Virginia and Kentucky.

The 4G LTE home internet service costs $40 a month for existing Verizon cell phone customers, or $60 a month for non-Verizon customers. It provides download speeds of around 25Mbps and peak download speeds of up to 50Mbps, the carrier says.

Read more: The best internet providers for 2020: How to choose cable vs. DSL vs. satellite and more

You can check online to see if it’s available in your area.

Verizon’s 5G Home service is now also available in eight cities, after expanding to Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, on Thursday. It’s also live in Sacramento, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis and Detroit, and it’ll be available in two more cities by the end of this year, Verizon says.

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