Streaming report: Twitch inherits Mixer’s streamers, now has 91% of all content produced

Microsoft abruptly shutting down Mixer back in June has ended up as a boon for Amazon’s Twitch platform.

That’s according to a new report from Stream Hatchet and Streamlabs, which found that Twitch is now the host for more than 91% of streaming content. At the same time, while the overall audience for livestreaming has shrunk slightly from its all-time high back in April, Twitch’s popularity has nonetheless exploded during the pandemic, with nearly double the audience that it had at this time last year.

Independent data analyses in the streaming market focus on tracking hours watched to indicate a platform’s popularity with its audience. Relatively few take hours streamed — the amount of content being produced for that audience — into account. What makes the Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet report interesting is that it does track the latter, and it makes it look a lot like most of the ex-Mixer streamers have ended up landing on Twitch.

Twitch has the most content, but doesn’t have as wide a lead in audience share. (Source: Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet)

In the second quarter of 2020, before its closure, Mixer represented 14.2% of all hours livestreamed. In the third quarter, Twitch’s hours livestreamed grew by 14.5%, to an overall 91.1% share of outgoing content. While it strains credulity to argue that everyone who was making content on Mixer went to Twitch — Facebook Gaming’s own amount of hours streamed went up by 1%, which suggests that Microsoft successfully got at least a couple of its streamers to migrate — Twitch’s 14.5% increase is a massive spike that doesn’t have any other useful explanation.

At the end of last year, the story of the streaming platform market was a four-way race between Amazon’s Twitch, Google’s YouTube Gaming, Facebook Gaming, and Microsoft’s Mixer. Most analyses of the streaming

Twitch inherits Mixer’s streamers, now has 91% of all content produced



a close up of a sign: Esports star Shroud returns to Amazon’s Twitch with exclusive deal following Mixer shutdown


© Provided by Geekwire
Esports star Shroud returns to Amazon’s Twitch with exclusive deal following Mixer shutdown

Microsoft abruptly shutting down Mixer back in June has ended up as a boon for Amazon’s Twitch platform.

That’s according to a new report from Stream Hatchet and Streamlabs, which found that Twitch is now the host for more than 91% of streaming content. At the same time, while the overall audience for livestreaming has shrunk slightly from its all-time high back in April, Twitch’s popularity has nonetheless exploded during the pandemic, with nearly double the audience that it had at this time last year.

Independent data analyses in the streaming market focus on tracking hours watched to indicate a platform’s popularity with its audience. Relatively few take hours streamed — the amount of content being produced for that audience — into account. What makes the Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet report interesting is that it does track the latter, and it makes it look a lot like most of the ex-Mixer streamers have ended up landing on Twitch.



chart, diagram: Twitch has the most content, but doesn’t have as wide a lead in audience share. (Source: Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet )


© Provided by Geekwire
Twitch has the most content, but doesn’t have as wide a lead in audience share. (Source: Streamlabs/Stream Hatchet )

In the second quarter of 2020, before its closure, Mixer represented 14.2% of all hours livestreamed. In the third quarter, Twitch’s hours livestreamed grew by 14.5%, to an overall 91.1% share of outgoing content. While it strains credulity to argue that everyone who was making content on Mixer went to Twitch — Facebook Gaming’s own amount of hours streamed went up by 1%, which suggests that Microsoft successfully got at least a couple of its streamers to migrate — Twitch’s 14.5% increase is a massive spike that doesn’t have any other useful explanation.

Loading...

Load Error

At the end of last year, the story of

Twitch seems to have picked up most of Mixer’s streamers

Streamers seem to have flocked to Twitch from Mixer after the Microsoft-owned live-streaming service announced plans to shut down in June. A new report shows that Twitch’s share of hours broadcast on major live-streaming platforms jumped up by over 14 percentage points this quarter, taking away the nearly identical just over 14 percent market share that Mixer previously held.

With Mixer out of the picture, Twitch ended up with 91.1 percent of all hours spent streaming on these platforms between July and September, according to a new report from Streamlabs & Stream Hatchet that looked at streaming activity on Twitch, YouTube, and Facebook Gaming. Facebook Gaming grew slightly during that time period, to 3.4 percent from 2.4 percent, and YouTube shrunk slightly, to 5.5 percent from 6.7 percent.

That Twitch won out is particularly notable because Facebook made a serious effort to pick up Mixer’s streamers. It partnered with Mixer to help streamers get set up on the new platform, and Mixer started advertising Facebook Gaming during its final month online. Mixer’s website still forwards to Facebook Gaming today. Evidently, that wasn’t enough to convince Mixer streamers to pick yet another underdog in the streaming space.

“Hours streamed” is a useful metric for determining where streamers are spending their time, but it’s not necessarily the metric that matters. These platforms are primarily competing for viewership, and in that area, Twitch actually lost some ground. The report now puts Twitch at 63.6 percent market share, down from 67.6 percent. That should be particularly concerning because both YouTube and Facebook Gaming grew this quarter; Mixer made up only 1.4 percent of hours streamed, so these services are growing at a faster pace than Twitch.

Streaming viewership has

Move Forward Music Partners With Twitch For Live Streamed Programming, Launch Festival

The channel will also feature content such as a new series called The Board Room, a show that will take place in recording studios and feature two producers discussing each other’s work. The first episode, which will air during Move Forward Fest, features legendary hip-hop producers Just Blaze and The Alchemist, while later episodes, which will begin airing Oct. 22, will include Black Milk and Jake One, Drumma Boy and Sonny Digital, and more. It will host at least one live performance each week, as well as curated DJ sets, Q&As and talk-based shows which align with Move Forward’s track record of highlighting emerging artists and talent early in their careers. That will include the show Screen Time, hosted by Alexa Leighton, which will center on music videos from indie artists, and the music-discovery podcast Not 97.

“I want to be able to walk away from this year not just like, ‘We filled the gaps and plugged the holes and now we’re back to doing what we were doing before,’ but try to come out of it with something that’s a complementary piece so that when we start coming back and doing live shows again, we’ll still have other content that’s complementary,” Damashek says. “And we can offer a richer experience that’s still centered around live music, but that has these different elements to it.”

The Twitch stream will be free to watch with ads, with a paid subscription option that will remove ads, allow viewers to interact with those on the stream, and be entered to win product and merchandise giveaways. And Damashek sees the partnership as adding value to what Move Forward does, which will stick around even once the company is able to promote live concerts again.

“I’m a firm believer that concerts