Huawei tweets it will debut its Mate 40 devices on October 22nd

Huawei has tweeted that it will reveal its Mate 40 series on October 22nd, likely the last of its phones to have Kirin chips— at least for the foreseeable future— due to the ongoing economic pressure from the US.

Richard Yu, CEO of Huawei’s consumer business unit, said at a conference August 7th that “this year may be the last generation of Huawei Kirin high-end chips.” The US has accused Huawei of building backdoors into network infrastructure, ostensibly to aid Chinese government spying efforts. Huawei has denied the Trump administration’s accusations of spying.

But the Trump administration placed Huawei and 114 of its affiliates on its Entity List in May 2019, which meant US firms were unable to sell technology to the company without explicit US government approval.

It also meant Google was barred from doing business with Huawei, preventing Huawei from obtaining an Android license, and keeping Google apps off Huawei devices. In May, the US Commerce Department issued an amended export rule to block shipments of semiconductors to Huawei.

That export rule prevented foreign manufacturers of semiconductors who use American software and technology in their operations from shipping their products to Huawei unless they first obtained a license from the US. The Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC), the largest semiconductor manufacturer in the world, reportedly halted orders for Huawei’s HiSilicon unit in May following the new US rule.

There’s no word yet on when the Mate 40 devices will ship to customers, but rumors suggest Huawei will introduce Mate 40 and Mate 40 Pro editions. The Mate 40 Pro is expected to have a 6.7-inch screen, with the Mate 40 coming in at 6.5 inches. Android Authority says the devices could be priced between €1,200 and €1,300 (or $1400 to $1500).

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The Fly on Pence’s Head, Memes and Tweets from the Vice Presidential Debate

There were frustrating interruptions, though not as many as in the first debate. There were dodged questions, animated facial expressions and one candidate running particularly roughshod over the moderator.

And yes, there was a fly on top of Vice President Mike Pence’s head.

That was what excited social media during the sole vice-presidential debate, one in which the tone was markedly more subdued compared with last week’s presidential debate but in which the dynamics remained largely the same: The Republican incumbent showed little regard for the agreed-upon rules, and the Democratic challenger mostly complied.

And, again, a fly landed on Mr. Pence’s head.

So, for posterity, here is how the internet — or how we casually refer to that insular, blue-check-verified version of the proverbial diner in a steel town — reacted to the debate.

About an hour into the debate, a fly suddenly appeared on Mr. Pence’s head, resting motionless yet extremely visible set against his silver hair. It sat there for two minutes and three seconds, enough time to spawn thousands of memes and somehow crash Twitter’s trending topics.

Even a comedian who spent nearly a decade finding humor in the travails of the vice presidency was impressed by the fly’s appearance.

The Biden campaign even turned the fly into its latest get-out-the-vote canvasser and fund-raiser.

The Trump campaign had put out no fly content as of late Wednesday.

The questions prepared by Susan Page, the Washington bureau chief for USA Today, were topical, sharp and specific. They were just rarely answered.

Rather, both candidates (though Mr. Pence more frequently than Ms. Harris) simply used their time to make prepared remarks or attacks, occasionally bantering with each other, but rarely answering the questions.

With the two candidates seated 12 feet

Now Twitter ‘won’t tolerate’ tweets hoping that someone dies

In the hours since the president revealed he has COVID-19, some people have been tweeting that they’re in favor of the virus. This Motherboard article mentions they asked Twitter about the behavior, and were informed that under its current rules, tweets that wish or hope for death of anyone are not allowed.

Twitter told Motherboard that the rule has been in place since April, but a look at the Internet Archive shows this specific policy appears to have arrived as part of the simplified rules Twitter rolled out in the spring of 2019. Since June 2019 the rules have remained the same:

Wishing or hoping serious harm on a person or group of people

We do not tolerate content that wishes, hopes or expresses a desire for death, serious bodily harm or fatal disease against an individual or group of people. This includes, but is not limited to: 

In a tweet attempting to clarify the rules, Twitter’s communications department explained that breaking these rules may not result in a suspended account. If enforcement happens, it may mean the tweet needs to be removed, and as we’ve seen in earlier circumstances, that could mean the account is locked until that happens.

Separately, a Facebook spokesperson said their platform is also removing content that wishes for the president’s death, including comments and posts tagging him.

What many people are wondering now, is how these policies could have been applied to the president’s own account, or to the hordes of people who’ve cast death threats against others on the platforms for years without action. While a policy specifically banning this kind of post exists now, there’s little communication from Twitter or Facebook about why it couldn’t have arrived earlier while conspiracy theorists and other extremists made posts that have lead to actual violence.

Twitter will add transcriptions for voice tweets to promote accessibility

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Twitter is working on adding transcriptions to voice tweets.


Angela Lang/CNET

Twitter said it’s working on adding transcriptions to voice tweets in order to make the feature, which it began testing in the summer, more accessible. This comes after many criticized the social media platform for not taking all users’ needs into consideration before the release.

“We’re rolling out voice Tweets to more of you on iOS so we can keep learning about how people use audio,” the company said in a tweet on Tuesday. “Since introducing the feature in June, we’ve taken your feedback seriously and are working to have transcription available to make voice Tweets more accessible.”

When Twitter first rolled out voice tweets, many took to the platform to voice their concerns about the company not making the feature accessible to people with disabilities.

“We’re sorry about testing voice Tweets without support for people who are visually impaired, deaf, or hard of hearing,” the company tweeted in June. “It was a miss to introduce this experiment without this support. Accessibility should not be an afterthought.” 

At the time, Twitter added it had “fixed several issues related to vision accessibility, including making voice Tweets identifiable on the timeline and making accessibility improvements to the voice Tweet experience.” The company also mentioned then that it was looking into ways to support manual and auto transcriptions.

In

Twitter Expands Rollout of Voice Tweets Feature for iOS Users

Twitter says it’s making its voice tweets feature available to more users on iOS. Launched in June for a limited number of users, voice tweets is designed to allow people to tweet with their voice, sending voice-based messages instead of text.


Voice tweets can be created by opening up the tweet composer and tapping the new wavelengths icon. A screen then opens with a user’s Twitter icon, which can be tapped to begin a recording.

Twitter users can capture up to 140 seconds of audio, but continuous recording is possible and longer audio will create multiple voice tweets.

Listening to a voice tweet can be done by tapping on the image in the Twitter timeline. On iOS, playback starts in an audio player that’s docked at the bottom of the timeline so users can continue to scroll through Twitter.


Since their arrival on iOS, voice tweets have been criticized for lacking accessibility in the form of audio transcriptions. That criticism led Twitter employees to reveal they’d been asked to volunteer their time on top of their usual work to focus on accessibility.

The ensuing flak led Twitter to tell The Verge that it was exploring how to build a “more dedicated group” to focus on accessibility, and the company has since announced new two teams in that vein. Twitter subsequently said it plans to add automated captions to audio and video on the platform by “early 2021.”

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