Byos Introduces Endpoint Micro-Segmentation Solution to Extend Zero Trust Access to Any Remote Wi-Fi Connection

First Solution to Protect Users and Organizations from the Risk of Unmanaged and Unprotected Home and Public Wi-Fi Networks

Today Byos, Inc. introduced the Byos™ μGateway™ (“micro-gateway”), the first plug-and-play security product that protects endpoints from threats on local Wi-Fi networks through endpoint micro-segmentation.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201014005204/en/

The Byos™ μGateway™ “micro-gateway” — the first plug-and-play security product that protects endpoints from threats on local Wi-Fi networks through endpoint micro-segmentation. (Photo: Business Wire)

Organizations are now more than ever dependent on employees connecting from uncontrolled home and public networks to do their jobs. Unfortunately, these networks are “dirty” and risky to connect to. VPNs only protect data in transit between users and corporate networks; they do nothing to prevent the spread of malware or the other risks associated with connecting to these networks. In fact, Byos has identified the “Dirty Half Dozen” attacks that must be protected from, including:

  • Scanning, Enumerating, and Fingerprinting

  • Eavesdropping

  • Remote Access Exploits

  • Evil-Twin Wi-Fi

  • Lateral Network Infections

  • DNS hijacking

The patent-pending Byos μGateway is a hardened, embedded security stack on a small USB device that solves this problem by isolating each endpoint onto its own unique network micro-segment of one, protecting it from compromised networks and other compromised endpoints on the network. Byos allows employees, contractors and devices to safely and securely connect to any network, regardless of their location or network environment.

Easily Deploy, Manage, and Secure Every Remote Network Connection

Combined with the µGateway, the Byos Endpoint Micro-Segmentation Solution has a centralized Management Console giving IT and security teams a simpler, more efficient approach to security policy definition, enforcement, and management.

The Byos Management Console allows IT teams to deploy and centrally manage Byos μGateways at scale and provides full visibility and control over all

How Agencies Can Build Trust

Step 1: Get to Know Each Other & Clarify Expectations

Part of building a good working relationship from the start has to do with clarifying expectations. Getting the internal and external teams together is a first step in creating a context where both the agency and the client can ask their questions and obtain alignment.

You probably have quite a lot of information from the sales process, but this is a great moment to review the client profile and add new data to it.

So think about a kick-off call with everyone involved – the client representatives, the account representative, maybe the Head of Client Service, the agency CEO, the SEO strategist, content writer, etc.

Decide on the roles based on their direct involvement with the audit, strategy, and the following SEO campaign and its specific.

Large meetings can sometimes mean that not everyone gets to have their voices heard, so the account manager should assume the role of the host and introduce each participant.

In an online-only setting, you could use break-out rooms, Zoom’s group feature, to foster even more direct contact. Also, you can use a camera-on policy to gather as much nonverbal input as possible and better facilitate the meeting.

This meeting is all about setting the project environment. Go ahead and clarify basic questions like:

  • What are the expectations around communication (channels, frequency, reports, etc.)?
  • When can I see the first results?
  • What are the business challenges at the moment?
  • Who do I ask for help and input (on both sides)?
  • What other information do we need to better understand the business context?

Both teams will probably have questions regarding the onboarding/working process – apart from the ones in the discovery questionnaire – and regarding the project per se.

Regarding the latter, make sure that the

Trust Is A Must For Secure Cloud Migration

Pritesh Parekh is the Chief Trust & Security Officer, VP of Engineering at Virtustream (A Dell Technologies Business)

Embrace cloud-native solutions and a unified security approach to streamline your IT modernization journey.

Not too long ago, it used to be commonplace for discussions with IT organizations to revolve around convincing the skeptics of the many benefits of cloud. This is no longer the case. Through the years, those discussions evolved because IT leaders grew to understand the clear value of adopting cloud. Not only can cloud be a more secure, elastic and scalable approach to managing workloads, but it is also integral to those on their IT modernization journey.

One of the key advantages of cloud solutions today is the IT flexibility that organizations can gain to manage modern workloads and adopt the latest innovative technologies while controlling costs.

One of the first hurdles to avoid is taking a lift-and-shift approach to cloud adoption, which can lead to higher costs, increased cybersecurity risks and the inability to fully realize the benefits of cloud. Existing business systems and applications were historically built to run in on-premises data centers. As a result, simply moving them to the cloud does not necessarily translate into the full realization of cloud benefits. Likewise, the tools and techniques used to manage these on-premises workloads cannot simply extend into the cloud.

Companies that take an on-premises approach and repurpose it for cloud deployment can face unnecessary complexity and expense, ultimately undermining the benefits of running workloads in the cloud. In order to realize true cloud success, you must couple cloud migration with IT modernization, thus taking advantage of all that cloud technology has to offer — in particular, transforming your approach to cybersecurity.

In cloud we trust: Start by unifying your IT security.

IT organizations understandably

Can I Trust Retirement Planning Software?

What is the state of retirement and retirement income software? Can I trust what I get from my adviser? What do I need to know about underlying assumptions and the like?

Those are the questions posed to Jeffrey Levine, director of advanced planning at Buckingham Wealth Partners, in this episode of Ask the Hammer.

And the answer: “The state of software today is infinitely better than it was in previous years,” says Levine. It can do so much more than it did five or six years ago and it’s iterating quickly. “It’s really incredible to see the pace at which things are changing,” he says.

But while retirement planning software is “infinitely better” than what it was it’s still light years away from where Levine thinks it needs to be. “There’s still a lot of gaps,” he says.

Levine also says it’s important to get a list of the assumptions – inflation rates, investment returns, life expectancy, tax rates, etc. – being used in retirement planning software programs. “The old expression garbage in, garbage out truly applies here,” says Levine. 

And you really can’t trust the software’s output until you understand the underlying assumptions and assess whether the assumptions are realistic, he notes. 

A good way to determine if the assumptions are correct, Levine says, is to ask what they are based on. The wrong answer, he says, is “that’s what the software has as its default. That is not a good answer. It doesn’t mean the software is wrong, but that is not a good answer.”

What you want to hear is: The assumptions are based on research or academic studies and not guesswork or the defaults.

In addition, Levine says it’s wise to adjust assumptions and conduct what-if scenarios. What if inflation is 4% instead of 2%? What

AI Weekly: Palantir, Twitter, and building public trust into the AI design process

The news cycle this week seemed to grab people by the collar and shake them violently. On Wednesday, Palantir went public. The secretive company with ties to the military, spy agencies, and ICE is reliant on government contracts and intent on racking up more sensitive data and contracts in the U.S. and overseas.

Following a surveillance-as-a-service blitz last week, Amazon introduced Amazon One, which allows touchless biometric scans of people’s palms for Amazon or third-party customers. The company claims palm scans are less invasive than other forms of biometric identifiers like facial recognition.

On Thursday afternoon, in the short break between an out-of-control presidential debate and the revelation that the president and his wife had contracted COVID-19, Twitter shared more details about how it created AI that appears to prefer white faces over black faces. In a blog post, Twitter chief technology officer Parag Agrawal and chief design officer Dantley Davis called failure to publish the bias analysis at the same time as the rollout of the algorithm years ago “an oversight.” The Twitter executives shared additional details about a bias assessment that took place in 2017, and Twitter says it’s working on moving away from the use of saliency algorithms. When the problem initially received attention, Davis said Twitter would consider getting rid of image cropping altogether.

There are still unanswered questions about how Twitter used its saliency algorithm, and in some ways the blog post shared late Thursday brings up more questions than it answers. The blog post simultaneously states that no AI can be completely free of bias, and that Twitter’s analysis of its saliency algorithm showed no racial or gender bias. A Twitter engineer said some evidence of bias was found during the initial assessment.

Twitter also continues to share none of the results from