AT&T has trouble figuring out where it offers government-funded Internet

An AT&T logo on the side of a building.

If you live in an area where AT&T has taken government funds in exchange for deploying broadband, there’s a chance you won’t be able to get the service—even if AT&T initially tells you it’s available.

AT&T’s Mississippi division has received over $283 million from the Federal Communications Commission’s Connect America Fund since 2015 and in exchange is required to extend home-Internet service to over 133,000 potential customer locations. As we previously reported, the Mississippi Public Service Commission (PSC) accused AT&T of submitting false coverage data to the FCC program. As evidence, Mississippi said its “investigation found concrete, specific examples that show AT&T Mississippi has reported location addresses… as being served when, in fact, the addresses are without service.”

AT&T has since provided an explanation that confirms it submitted false data on the serviceability of some addresses but says it will still meet the overall requirement of serving over 133,000 new customer locations. The problem is in how AT&T determines whether its wireless home-Internet service can reach individual homes and businesses. AT&T uses propagation modeling software to map out coverage areas, but the software isn’t always accurate. This wouldn’t be a problem if AT&T deployed fiber-to-the-home or fiber-to-the-node in these areas, but the company is meeting its obligations with wireless service.

“Unsuccessful installation” attempts

In some cases, customers set up appointments with AT&T to set up broadband service at addresses that AT&T had incorrectly reported to the FCC’s universal service program as being served.

“To be clear, AT&T Mississippi learned, via an unsuccessful installation attempt, that it could not offer service meeting the CAF II [Connect America Fund] minimum performance requirements at those addresses only after it had reported those addresses [to the administrator of the FCC program],” AT&T wrote last week in a letter to the FCC that was published

A Major Bitcoin Exchange Is In Even Worse Trouble Than Thought

The bitcoin and cryptocurrency world was rocked last week by news U.S. authorities had levied charges against major bitcoin and crypto exchange BitMEX and its leadership team.

BitMEX executives Arthur Hayes, Benjamin Delo and Samuel Reed were indicted by the U.S. government on October 1, accused of flouting U.S. banking laws while serving American customers.

Now, in a further blow to the controversial Seychelles-based bitcoin and cryptocurrency exchange, the influential blockchain data company Chainalysis has branded BitMEX a “high-risk” exchange—with external data showing investors have removed almost 50,000 bitcoin tokens from BitMEX since last week.

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On Monday this week, Chainalysis warned its clients that BitMEX, which rose to prominence throughout bitcoin’s massive 2017 bull run and was up until recently the largest bitcoin-derivatives exchange, would be considered a “high risk exchange” from October 13.

“Any transfers from October 1 and later should be considered high risk,” Chainalysis told clients in an email that was first reported by bitcoin and cryptocurrency news and analysis outlet The Block, adding BitMEX transfers will trigger alerts for those using the Chainalysis monitoring tool.

The Chainalysis warning compounds data from blockchain analytics firm Glassnode that shows around 45,000 bitcoin tokens have been withdrawn from BitMEX since the start of the month, representing a 27% drop in the total bitcoin on the exchange.

“On Friday 2 October, the day after the announcement, BitMEX saw its largest ever day of net outflows as investors rushed to remove their funds