HomePod Mini, 6th-Gen Apple TV Could Track U1 Chip-Powered Devices, Leaker Says

KEY POINTS

  • Apple is working on a smaller version of the HomePod and a new Apple TV
  • Both devices will make use of Apple’s UWB technology, a report says
  • The tech allows both devices to act as base stations monitoring all U1 devices in a user’s home

Apple’s upcoming small home speaker, the HomePod Mini, and the sixth-generation Apple TV will feature advanced technologies that allow them to do certain things like keep track of other iDevices, a leaker claims.

Noted tipster Jon Prosser, creator of Frontpage Tech and leaker who claims to be the “world’s most controversial Apple reporter,” suggested that Apple is equipping its upcoming HomePod Mini and Apple TV with technologies allowing them to do “next level stuff.”

Per the leaker, who has a noteworthy 74.5% accuracy when it comes to Apple leaks and rumors according to AppleTrack, the new smart home speaker and TV device will “both act as UWB base stations.” UWB stands for “ultra wideband” and is used by the company’s U1 chip, allowing iDevices such as iPhones to be located in the event it gets misplaced or dropped.

The new technology found in the HomePod Mini and Apple TV will allow the devices to turn “regular hardware into HomeKit hardware,” Prosser said.

Here’s what the new devices can do using the new tech:

  • First, it will allow the devices to “precisely track” the user’s location inside the home as he or she carries a device with the U1 chip, such as the iPhone 11.
  • Second, it will allow the HomePod Mini and sixth-gen Apple TV to interact with other devices to control media playback, adjust brightness and volume levels and manage door locks.
  • Third, and more interestingly, it will allow the devices to work with the Find My

Einride raises $10 million to fast track its autonomous electric cargo pods

For the past four years, Swedish startup Einride has captured interest, investment and even a few customer contracts for its unusual-looking pods — electric and autonomous vehicles that are designed to carry freight. But progress in developing, testing and validating autonomous vehicles — particularly ones that don’t even have space for a driver and rely on teleoperations — is an expensive and time-consuming task.

The company has made some progress with its T-Pod vehicles; four of them are on public roads today and even carry freight for customer Oatly, the Swedish food producer. Now, a year after raising $25 million, the company said it has another $10 million coming in from its existing investors.

The announcement comes ahead of a new vehicle the Einride will unveil October 8. Not much is known about the vehicle; Einride has only supplied a short and obscure teaser video.

Einride said the $10 million in new funding was led by impact fund Norrsken VC and included participation from EQT Ventures fund, Nordic Ninja VC and Ericsson Ventures. Norrsken VC is also joining Einride’s advisory board.

The capital will be used to fast track the official launch of its Einride Pods, the company said. Einride acknowledged that startups in AI and robotics were upended, and even shuttered altogether, in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. The company contests that demand for contactless delivery options — not coincidentally the kind it hopes to provide — has grown because of COVID-19. Einride said it’s maintained a “strong stream of new partnerships,” including onboarding partners Oatly and supermarket chain Lidl as well as launching a freight mobility platform designed to give customers information on shipping volume, distance driven and associated emissions and help pick the most efficient routes.

“There is both a lot of excitement and a

810-HP Hyundai Veloster Concept Is an All-Electric RWD Track Car

Photo credit: Hyundai
Photo credit: Hyundai

From Car and Driver

In a follow-up to its electric eTCR Veloster race car introduced last year, Hyundai has built a new battery-powered concept based on our favorite hot hatch. It’s called the RM20e, and like the Veloster eTCR, it has a mid-mounted motor and spins the rear wheels. Developed in collaboration with Rimac, it makes a claimed 810 horsepower and 708 lb-ft of torque. That is . . . a lot.

The RM20e is the latest in a long line of midship Hyundai Veloster concepts, with the first having debuted in 2015. The RM stands for “racing midship.” According to the South Korean company, the car is an engineering rolling lab for testing its new high-performance tech. The single 800-volt electric motor is powered by a 60.0-kWh lithium-ion battery pack, which Hyundai claims is able to propel the car to 60 mph in less than three seconds and on to 124 mph in 9.9 seconds. Top speed is over 155 mph.

Hyundai says its recent investment and partnership with Croatian firm Rimac is what facilitated this all-electric concept. The carmaker says the “platform will continue to evolve along with the growth of this Rimac partnership,” which could only mean more cool high-horsepower track cars going forward.

“Our new electrified RM20e pushes the proven RM platform forcefully into a new, environmentally focused decade of the 21st century, stretching the performance envelope of electrification on normal road environments,” Hyundai R&D boss Albert Biermann said in a statement. “RM20e represents a revolutionary new chapter of electrified performance for the Racing Midship series, and our N engineers continue to garner valuable insights in the arena of zero-emission performance dynamics.”

You Might Also Like

Source Article