Nasdaq Women in Technology: Niharika Sharma, Senior Software Engineer, Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab

Women in Tech: Niharika Sharma

Niharika Sharma is a Senior Software Engineer for Nasdaq’s Machine Intelligence Lab. She designs systems that gather, process and apply machine learning/natural language processing technologies on natural language data, generating valuable insights to support business decisions. Over the past years, she worked on Natural Language Generation (NLG) and Surveillance Automation for Nasdaq Advisory Services. We sat down with Niharika to learn more about how she got her start in computer science and how she approaches challenges in her career.

Can you describe your day-to-day as a senior software engineer at Nasdaq?

My day-to-day work involves collaborating with Data Scientists to solve problems, ideating business possibilities with product teams and working with Data/Software Engineers to transform ideas into solutions.

How did you become involved in the technology industry, and how has technology influenced your role?

My first exposure to Computer Science was a Logo programming class that I took as a junior in high school. After that, I took a couple of coding classes for fun.

When it came to choosing a college major, my high school Mathematics teacher suggested I consider a career in Software Engineering. At first, I thought, “Programming?! That’s too geeky!”. I liked coding, but I never wanted to be that nerd who sits in a cube staring at a computer all day. For college, I chose to study Chemistry at Delhi University, but a few months into the course, I realized technology was where I belonged, and I eventually pivoted to Engineering.

A decade later, I admit that it was the best decision I ever made. I found the concepts and problem solving so engaging that after obtaining my degree, I took a leap of faith and moved to the U.S. to pursue a Masters in Computer Science from Northeastern University. In the final semester, I

4 Indian Entrepreneurs Who Embraced Technology In Their Business Models


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Without a doubt, one of the most exciting technological innovations this decade has seen is the evolution of blockchain. Since its inception, it has revolutionized digital commerce, technology and brought about the possibility of near-instant financial transactions. The global economic model is undergoing a huge transformation and being one of the frontrunners in technology, the Indian entrepreneurship industry is adapting blockchain technology. Here are four entrepreneurs from India who are leveraging the power of blockchain.

Sandeep Nailwal, Co-Founder and COO of Matic Networks

Nailwal co-founded Matic Network in 2018 and worked with his team to make it a global leader in blockchain space with a $200 million market cap. Today, Matic Network is one of the fastest growing DApps (decentralized applications) platforms enabling tonnes of applications utilization of blockchains in their business models and creating community-centric businesses.

Coming from a top B-School in India, Nailwal has been involved in multiple ventures ranging from health and fitness, retail e-commerce to productized B2B services. This has given him a breadth of experience which has been instrumental in the success of his efforts. He has been working with various government institutions (especially in India), helping them utilize blockchain technology in a way that creates a more corruption-free, transparent, efficient and inclusive environment for our billion-people strong country. He, along with the Matic Network team, are widely regarded as the ones who have fuelled the Indian blockchain developer ecosystem to its current heights due to continuous efforts in building the blockchain development community in India with hackathons, developer grants, mentorship, investments, etc.

Matic is a leading layer-2 scaling solution for Ethereum. It aims to provide mass adoption ready infrastructure to

How the architecture of new home security vision systems affects choice of memory technology

A camera or a computer: How the architecture of new home security vision systems affects choice of memory technology

A long-forecast surge in the number of products based on artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning (ML) technologies is beginning to reach mainstream consumer markets.

It is true that research and development teams have found that, in some applications such as autonomous driving, the innate skill and judgement of a human is difficult, or perhaps even impossible, for a machine to learn. But while in some areas the hype around AI has run ahead of the reality, with less fanfare a number of real products based on ML capabilities are beginning to gain widespread interest from consumers. For instance, intelligent vision-based security and home monitoring systems have great potential: analyst firm Strategy Analytics forecasts growth in the home security camera market of more than 50% in the years between 2019 and 2023, from a market value of US$8 billion to US$13 billion.

The development of intelligent cameras is possible because one of the functions best suited to ML technology is image and scene recognition. Intelligence in home vision systems can be used to:
– Detect when an elderly or vulnerable person has fallen to the ground and is potentially injured
– Monitor that the breathing of a sleeping baby is normal
– Recognise the face of the resident of a home (in the case of a smart doorbell) or a pet (for instance in a smart cat flap), and automatically allow them to enter
– Detect suspicious or unrecognised activity outside the home and trigger an intruder alarm

These new intelligent vision systems for the home, based on advanced image signal processors (ISPs), are in effect function-specific computers. The latest products in this category have adopted computer-like architectures which depend for

Court Orders Seizure of Ransomware Botnet Controls as U.S. Election Nears | Technology News

SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) – Microsoft said Monday it had used a court order to take control of computers that were installing ransomware and other malicious software on local government networks and threatening to disrupt the November election.

The maker of the Windows operating system said it seized a series of internet protocol addresses hosted by U.S. companies that had been directing activity on computers infected with Trickbot, one of the most common pieces of malware in the world.

More than a million computers have been infected with Trickbot, and the operators use the software to install more pernicious programs, including ransomware, for both criminal groups and national governments that pay for the access, researchers said.

Trickbot has shown up in a number of public governments, which could be hurt worse if the operators encrypt files or install programs that interfere with voter registration records or the display and public reporting of election results, Microsoft said.

“Ransomware is one of the largest threats to the upcoming election,” said Microsoft Corporate Vice President Tom Burt. Among other programs, Trickbot has been used to deliver Ryuk ransomware, which has been blamed in attacks on the city of Durham, N.C., and hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Microsoft worked with Broadcom’s Symantec, security firm ESET and other companies to dissect Trickbot installations and trace them to the command addresses, the companies said. Microsoft for the first time used strict provisions in copyright law to convince a federal judge in the Eastern District of Virginia that since Trickbot used Microsoft code, the company should be able to seize the operator’s infrastructure from their unknowing hosting providers.

The seizure follows mechanical attempts to disrupt Trickbot last week by sending the operators bad information, researchers said. The Washington Post reported that U.S. Cyber Command was behind that effort,

Is Synaptics (SYNA) Outperforming Other Computer and Technology Stocks This Year?

For those looking to find strong Computer and Technology stocks, it is prudent to search for companies in the group that are outperforming their peers. Is Synaptics (SYNA) one of those stocks right now? A quick glance at the company’s year-to-date performance in comparison to the rest of the Computer and Technology sector should help us answer this question.

Synaptics is one of 601 companies in the Computer and Technology group. The Computer and Technology group currently sits at #11 within the Zacks Sector Rank. The Zacks Sector Rank includes 16 different groups and is listed in order from best to worst in terms of the average Zacks Rank of the individual companies within each of these sectors.

The Zacks Rank is a proven model that highlights a variety of stocks with the right characteristics to outperform the market over the next one to three months. The system emphasizes earnings estimate revisions and favors companies with improving earnings outlooks. SYNA is currently sporting a Zacks Rank of #1 (Strong Buy).

Within the past quarter, the Zacks Consensus Estimate for SYNA’s full-year earnings has moved 62.37% higher. This shows that analyst sentiment has improved and the company’s earnings outlook is stronger.

Based on the most recent data, SYNA has returned 23.25% so far this year. Meanwhile, stocks in the Computer and Technology group have gained about 22.58% on average. This means that Synaptics is outperforming the sector as a whole this year.

Breaking things down more, SYNA is a member of the Electronics – Semiconductors industry, which includes 35 individual companies and currently sits at #64 in the Zacks Industry Rank. This group has gained an average of 29.54% so far this year, so SYNA is slightly underperforming its industry in this area.

SYNA will likely be looking to continue its