Celebrity accounts accessed after employees fall for tech support scam

The hackers who took over a number of high profile Twitter accounts, including those belonging to Barack Obama and Elon Musk, for several hours this summer gained entry into Twitter’s internal systems simply by posing as company IT officials making a support call, according to an investigative report Wednesday by New York regulators.



Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Elon Musk, Kim Kardashian are posing for a picture: From left clockwise, Barack Obama, Elon Musk, Kim Kardashian and Joe Biden


© Getty Images/AP
From left clockwise, Barack Obama, Elon Musk, Kim Kardashian and Joe Biden

At the time of the July 15 attack, Twitter had no chief information security officer and suffered from poor internal security controls, the report concluded.

Loading...

Load Error

Officials behind the report called for additional cybersecurity regulation of major tech platforms.

“In other industries that are deemed critical infrastructure, such as telecommunications, utilities, and finance, we have established regulators and regulations to ensure that the public interest is protected,” said the report from New York’s Department of Financial Services. “With respect to cybersecurity, that is what is needed for large, systemically important social media companies.”

In a statement, Twitter said it has taken steps to enhance the security of its platform, cooperated with the Department’s investigation, and that multiple arrests have been carried out in the wake of the attack.

“Protecting people’s privacy and security is a top priority for Twitter, and it is not a responsibility we take lightly,” the statement said. “We have been continuously investing in improvements to our teams and our technology that enable people to use Twitter securely. This work is constant and always evolving.”

The high-profile hack saw several celebrity accounts taken over by a bitcoin scam that promised victims a 100% return on their investments. In addition to Obama and Musk, the hackers were able to take over accounts belonging to Joe Biden, Kim Kardashian West, Uber and Apple, among others. As one of the nation’s

Company Reaffirms Ryzen 5000 Support On 400-Series Chipsets

Motherboard manufacturer Asus has confirmed it’s 400-series chipset motherboards will still support AMD’s new Ryzen 5000-series Zen 3 CPUs.

The company was forced to issue a statement today following a supposed slip up by one of its customer service representatives. In a post on Reddit, one user claims to have been told by Asus that the company would not be releasing new BIOS versions for its older 400-series chipset motherboards to allow them to work with Zen 3 CPUs such as the Ryzen 9 5950X. As a result, owners of said boards would not be able to upgrade their CPUs.

Instead, the representative suggested purchasing a newer motherboard to replace the user’s premium X470 model. AMD has been quite clear that X470 motherboards would support Ryzen 5000 CPUs and recently confirmed that motherboard manufacturers were working on BIOS versions accordingly, with 400-series boards receiving these via downloads in early 2021.

Asus exact statement I received today goes as follows:

“…ASUS will follow AMD’s support plan to release a new BIOS on X470, B450 and B450 II motherboards and all those available in the market at present will also be compatible with that BIOS upgrade. Beta BIOS support, following AMD guidelines and timelines means this will be ready to roll out around Jan 2021.

[we will confirm] closer to the time if certain units need to be upgraded with a previous CPU but all new ASUS B450 II motherboards will come with USB Bios Flashback so you’ll be able to get a new CPU and upgrade the BIOS straight away without posting with a previous generation CPU.”

With AMD’s Ryzen 5000 CPUs offering huge performance boosts according the company, this will likely come as welcome news to anyone that saw the Reddit post and

iPhone 12, 12 Pro and 12 mini support mmWave 5G, but only in the US [u]

Apple’s latest iPhone 12 models are the first to feature 5G connectivity, but access to ultra-fast mmWave bands are limited to customers in the U.S.

Support for speedy 5G connectivity was a central selling point when Apple announced the new handsets on Tuesday. According to a support document, however, access to bands that offer the greatest data transfer potential are limited to certain models.

As noted by Apple, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro, iPhone 12 Pro Max and iPhone mini integrate Qualcomm radios compatible with the n260 and n261 bands, which operate at 39GHz and 28GHz, respectively. Known as mmWave, these high-frequency bands feature wavelengths that can be measured in millimeters instead of centimeters or larger, and provide ample data transfer capability with bandwidths exceeding 3GHz.

While Apple’s 5G-compatible iPhones support a wide range of bands, including those that operate in the robust sub-6GHz spectrum, mmWave is restricted to U.S. models.

Apple says it “had to do things a little differently” to enable 5G communication on iPhone, like engineering custom antennas and radio parts.

“Then we gave iPhone 12 Pro the most 5G bands of any smartphone, so you’ll get 5G in more places,” the company says on its website.

On the software side, Apple optimized its software stack to take full advantage of 5G’s speed while maximizing efficiency. The company claims “many apps” will net 5G gains without drawing additional power.

Apple is jumping on the 5G bandwagon, but is doing so in a typically slow and steady way. Sensitive to the immense power draw required to make 5G work, the company is implementing smart algorithms to enable the hungry radios only when needed.

Whether mmWave compatibility will extend to countries beyond the U.S. remains to be seen, but that is a distinct

iPhone 12 Lineup’s mmWave 5G Support Limited to the United States

As expected, the entire iPhone 12 lineup is compatible with faster 5G networks, but Apple’s website confirms that support for high-frequency mmWave bands is limited to models sold in the United States. This includes compatibility with Verizon’s new 5G Ultra Wideband network, which as of today is available in 55 cities across the country.


mmWave is supported on all iPhone 12 models sold in the United States, ranging from the iPhone 12 mini to the iPhone 12 Pro Max. iPhone 12 models sold in all other countries and regions are limited to sub-6GHz bands for 5G.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. In most countries that offer 5G, sub-6GHz networks are more common.

Apple says iPhone 12 models support more 5G bands than any other smartphone, and the devices can automatically adjust to LTE when necessary to save battery life, such as when updates are taking place in the background.

iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro pre-orders begin Friday, October 16 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time, with shipments starting Friday, October 23. The smaller 5.4-inch iPhone 12 mini and larger 6.7-inch iPhone 12 Pro Max are launching later, with pre-orders beginning Friday, November 6 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time and shipments starting Friday, November 13.

Source Article

Robin Hood foundation scores Wall Street support for nonprofits

CEO of The Robin Hood Foundation, Wes Moore, speaks during The Robin Hood Foundation’s 2018 benefit at Jacob Javitz Center on May 14, 2018 in New York City.

Kevin Mazur | Getty Images

One of Wall Street’s favorite charitable organizations has raised several million dollars to support a fund that invests in nonprofit groups run by people of color. 

The Robin Hood foundation’s Power Fund kicked off this summer as the coronavirus pandemic spread and amid nationwide protests sparked by the police killing of George Floyd on Memorial Day.  

Robin Hood funds over 200 poverty-fighting programs in New York City. It is led by Wes Moore, an author and former investment banker at Citigroup.

“I think part of the thing we’ve seen is that everything we’ve witnessed post George Floyd, these aren’t new things because of George Floyd,” Moore told CNBC. “I think that the conversations we’ve been able to have with — whether they be donors or CEOs of companies — is about the more we look into the patterns and practices that we had even prior to all this, the more it just highlights that we have to move with a sense of urgency.”

Robin Hood’s board is full of Wall Street leaders, including chairman John Griffin, who was once a hedge fund manager; and the group’s vice chair, Dina Powell McCormick, an executive at Goldman Sachs. David Solomon, Goldman Sachs’ CEO, is also a board member.

Robin Hood’s latest 990 disclosure form shows that it raised almost $140 million in 2018 through contributions and grants. The group raised nearly $130 million the prior year.

The Power Fund, which has raised over $6 million on top of the seed money provided by the Robin Hood Foundation, has moved to support five organizations including America on Tech, which runs