iPhone 12 Lineup’s mmWave 5G Support Limited to the United States

As expected, the entire iPhone 12 lineup is compatible with faster 5G networks, but Apple’s website confirms that support for high-frequency mmWave bands is limited to models sold in the United States. This includes compatibility with Verizon’s new 5G Ultra Wideband network, which as of today is available in 55 cities across the country.


mmWave is supported on all iPhone 12 models sold in the United States, ranging from the iPhone 12 mini to the iPhone 12 Pro Max. iPhone 12 models sold in all other countries and regions are limited to sub-6GHz bands for 5G.

mmWave is a set of 5G frequencies that promise ultra-fast speeds at short distances, making it best suited for dense urban areas. By comparison, sub-6GHz 5G is generally slower than mmWave, but the signals travel further, better serving suburban and rural areas. In most countries that offer 5G, sub-6GHz networks are more common.

Apple says iPhone 12 models support more 5G bands than any other smartphone, and the devices can automatically adjust to LTE when necessary to save battery life, such as when updates are taking place in the background.

iPhone 12 and iPhone 12 Pro pre-orders begin Friday, October 16 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time, with shipments starting Friday, October 23. The smaller 5.4-inch iPhone 12 mini and larger 6.7-inch iPhone 12 Pro Max are launching later, with pre-orders beginning Friday, November 6 at 5 a.m. Pacific Time and shipments starting Friday, November 13.

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Washington state’s broadband guru on an internet moonshot and being a metaphorical prom king

Russ Elliott in his man-cave COVID-19 workspace. (Photo courtesy of Russ Elliott)

When a buddy of Russ Elliott‘s asked if he’d join him in starting a telecom company, he flat out said no. While his friend had been a great help building a website he needed, the venture didn’t have any financial backing and Elliott wasn’t versed in internet connectivity.

But when his friend took the unusual step of sending him a motivational postcard — something with an iceberg and a corny message about not knowing what’s out there unless you took a risk — it played on his mind. Elliott had an MBA. He had drive. He decided to embrace the inspirational cliché.

With that, some 20 years ago Elliott helped launch what became a successful business in Colorado called Brainstorm Internet, serving as its president for 13 years.

“We were nimble and quick and had smart people on our team and started DSL in our area,” Elliott said. They applied scrappy, creative solutions to deliver connectivity to rural areas in parts of Colorado and New Mexico.

 It certainly is a moonshot, but it is not unattainable.

There were other ventures mixed in, but the job with Brainstorm Internet wound up prepping him for his current role as the first director of the recently created Washington State Broadband Office, an organization within the state’s Department of Commerce. Elliott has the challenge of providing high-speed internet connectivity — 150 megabits per second for both downloading and uploading data — to all residents and businesses in the state by 2028.

“That really does set us on a different path. It is the most aggressive goal in the country today,” Elliott said. “It certainly is a moonshot, but it is not unattainable.”

He estimates that half of Washington’s population currently lacks fast,

Covid-19 exposure notification apps are coming to US states



a laptop sits on top of a wooden table: A phone displays a screen from an exposure notification app, asking users if they'd like to begin sending and receiving data with other app users.


© Provided by Quartz
A phone displays a screen from an exposure notification app, asking users if they’d like to begin sending and receiving data with other app users.

For the first six months of the pandemic, the US lagged behind dozens of other countries in rolling out apps to alert citizens when they’ve come in contact with someone who has tested positive for Covid-19. But states are finally rolling out a wave of apps based on open-source software that has made their proliferation faster and cheaper.

Now people just need to download them.

The most recent additions to the canon are New York and New Jersey, which each launched apps on Oct. 1. By the next day, iPhone and Android users had installed the New York app about 250,000 times.

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Since August, seven other US states and Guam have launched exposure notification apps. Four of them—New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and Pennsylvania—were built using open-source code from the Linux Foundation Public Health (LFPH) initiative, which is freely available to any government that wants to crib from it to develop its own app. In September, Apple and Google announced an “exposure notification express” program to allow states to launch apps without doing any in-house coding at all.

Jenny Wanger, who works with LFPH to help US states get their coronavirus apps off the ground, says eight more state apps are likely to launch by the end of October. “They’re going to be able to do it at this point quite quickly and easily and cheaply,” she said, noting that states no longer need to hire developers to build new apps from scratch. “I would hope by the end of the year to see the majority of US states with exposure notification technology.”

All US state apps

Verizon’s LTE-based home internet is now in 48 US states, and it could be your last resort

Verizon’s 4G LTE-based home broadband service targeting rural communities is now available in 48 states, and it might be worth a look if it’s available in your area. The service, called “LTE Home Internet,” offers unlimited data, no data usage caps, and typical download speeds of 25Mbps with peak speeds of 50Mbps. But it’s only available in “parts” of 189 markets, and only in areas where the company doesn’t already offer other broadband options such as Fios or its in-home 5G service.



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© Illustration by Alex Castro / The Verge


LTE Home Internet starts at $40, but that’s only if you’re already on a monthly Verizon wireless plan that costs $30 or more. Those who don’t have an eligible Verizon wireless plan will instead pay $60 per month for LTE Home Internet. And the prices of both of tiers go up by $10 if you aren’t enrolled in Auto Pay and paper free billing.

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Whatever rate you pay, you’ll also need the LTE Home router, which costs $240 on its own or $10 per month over 24 months through the company’s device payment plan. If you opt for the monthly payment plan, though, Verizon will give you a $10 credit on your bill for each of those 24 months.

Verizon first rolled out the LTE Home Internet service out in July in a few select markets: Savannah, Georgia; Springfield, Missouri; and the Tri-Cities region of Tennessee, Virginia, and Kentucky. If you want to check if LTE Home Internet is available where you live, you can plug in your address here on Verizon’s website.

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Verizon expands LTE Home Internet to 48 states

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Verizon’s LTE Home Internet service is now live in parts of 48 states.


Angela Lang/CNET

Verizon has announced an expansion of its newly launched LTE Home Internet service, with the network footprint now reaching 189 regions across 48 states. As of Thursday, Verizon said, the service is available in some rural areas of every US state except Alaska and Vermont.

Verizon launched the new LTE Home service in July, aiming to bring better home internet services to people living in rural areas. It was initially launched in parts of Georgia, Missouri, Tennessee, Virginia and Kentucky.

The 4G LTE home internet service costs $40 a month for existing Verizon cell phone customers, or $60 a month for non-Verizon customers. It provides download speeds of around 25Mbps and peak download speeds of up to 50Mbps, the carrier says.

Read more: The best internet providers for 2020: How to choose cable vs. DSL vs. satellite and more

You can check online to see if it’s available in your area.

Verizon’s 5G Home service is now also available in eight cities, after expanding to Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, on Thursday. It’s also live in Sacramento, Los Angeles, Chicago, Houston, Indianapolis and Detroit, and it’ll be available in two more cities by the end of this year, Verizon says.

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