Coty Expands Kylie Skin Brand to Europe and Australia

Coty Inc.  (COTY) – Get Report said on Thursday that it was expanding its division for Kylie Jenner’s skincare products, Kylie Skin, to France, Germany, the U.K. and Australia.

The direct-to-consumer Kylieskin.com websites will ensure faster delivery of products. They’ll also enable customers to shop using their local languages and currencies, avoiding additional customs fees and duties, the New York beauty-products company said in a statement.

At last check Coty shares jumped 8% to $3.60.

“The launch of the Kylie Skin international websites also reinforces Coty’s strategic commitment to strengthening the direct-to-consumer business model,” said Simona Cattaneo, president of luxury brands at Coty. “We continue to see collections sell out quickly.” 

“I always wanted to bring my skincare line to more consumers around the world and this will allow for an easier shopping experience and faster delivery,” Jenner, a fashion designer and entrepreneur with a big social-media following, said in the company statement.

Initial product assortment for the direct-to-consumer websites in both Europe and Australia will include Coconut Body Scrub, Vanilla Milk Toner, Walnut Face Scrub, Hydrating Face Mask, and more.

“All products are cruelty-free, vegan, gluten free, paraben and sulfate free and suitable for all skin types,” Coty said.

Kylie Skin launched in 2019 in the U.S. Jenner started up Kylie Cosmetics in 2015.

In July, Coty shares rose after the company named beauty industry veteran Sue Nabi chief executive. 

Nabi’s appointment at the time placed the number of women CEOs in the S&P 500 at 28, or just 6% of the broadest benchmark of U.S.-listed companies.

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Website on Covid-19 skin rashes criticised for lack of BAME examples

A website dedicated to publishing pictures of and identifying Covid-19-related skin rashes has been criticised for sharing just two BAME examples.

The British Association of Dermatologists’ Covid-19 Skin Patterns website features around 400 images of Covid-19 associated rashes, but the collection features very few pictures of people with darker skin tones.

It shares images of rashes which were gathered by the Covid Symptom Study app in response to growing evidence that they are a side effect of the disease.


The list ranges from prickly heat and chickenpox-type rashes to raised itchy hives and chilblain-like “Covid fingers and toes.”

Evidence from the app showed the rashes were present in around 9 per cent of app users who had tested positive for Covid-19. Meanwhile, a sixth of children experienced a rash and no other symptoms.

Cosmetic doctor and founder of Adonia Medical clinic, Dr Ifeoma Ejikeme, told the Standard the lack of BAME examples being used in the medical sector is a “huge problem”.

She said: “This is a huge problem in our medical sector, this even occurs in medical literature as there is often a lack of representation especially in regards to black skin.

“I was disappointed when I saw the lack of black or brown skin but I was not surprised.”

Ore Odubiyi, the director of BME Medics, told the Guardian: “When we consider that certain BAME communities in the UK are disproportionately impacted by Covid-19, it is crucial that visual resources which show how Covid-related skin changes may appear in darker skin tones are made readily available at a similar standard seen in resources exemplifying signs of disease in fairer skin tones.”

A spokesman for the British Association of Dermatologists’ site

Covid-19 skin rash website criticised for lack of BAME examples

A website dedicated to sharing images of Covid-19 related skin rashes to help doctors and patients identify whether an unusual rash might be a sign of coronavirus infection has been criticised for containing just two images of black or brown skin.

The British Association of Dermatologists’ (BAD) Covid-19 Skin Patterns website features 400 images of Covid-associated rashes, from prickly heat and chickenpox-type rashes, to raised itchy hives, and chilblain-like ‘Covid fingers and toes’. They were gathered by the Covid Symptom Study app in response to growing evidence that skin rashes are a key feature of the disease, present in around 9% of app users testing positive for Covid-19. In children they may be even more predictive, with a sixth of children experiencing a rash and no other symptoms.

Related: Rashes, headaches, tingling: the less common coronavirus symptoms that patients have

“Being able to recognise these is crucial for reducing the spread of [Covid-19],” said president of BAD, Dr Tanya Bleiker.

Yet, the lack of images showing how Covid rashes manifest on people of darker skin tones may mean healthcare professionals are less equipped to diagnose potential cases, says Ore Odubiyi, director of BME Medics, a platform committed to improving diversity and inclusion in healthcare.

“When we consider that certain BAME communities in the UK are disproportionately impacted by Covid-19, it is crucial that visual resources which show how Covid-related skin changes may appear in darker skin tones are made readily available at a similar standard seen in resources exemplifying signs of disease in fairer skin tones.”

Around 3,000 images of suspected Covid rashes were uploaded via the app, but although the survey specifically requested images from BAME groups, only 173 were received: “This may be explained, in part, by cultural factors but also because rashes are less visible on darker