ASML signals double-digit annual growth as quarterly sales jump

AMSTERDAM (Reuters) – Semiconductor equipment maker ASML Holding NV ASML.AS on Wednesday posted a better-than-expected quarterly earnings and forecast a double-digit growth for next year on strong end-demand for electronics devices.

FILE PHOTO: ASML Holding logo is seen at company’s headquarters in Eindhoven, Netherlands, Januari 23, 2019. REUTERS/Eva Plevier

The company reported sales of 3.96 billion euros ($4.65 billion) in the third quarter ended Sept. 30, ahead of analyst estimates of 3.7 billion euros, and a net profit of 1.06 billion euros. In the third quarter of 2019, ASML reported net profit of 627 million euros and sales of 3 billion euros.

ASML Chief Financial Officer Roger Dassen forecast sales of 3.7 billion euros in the fourth quarter and said the company expected “low double digit” growth in 2021.

ASML has a near monopoly on lithography systems, enormous machines that can cost up to $200 million each and play a vital role in the manufacture of computer chips, mapping out their circuitry.

ASML’s customers include major chipmakers, notably global market leader Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co Ltd 2330.TW, followed by Samsung Electronics Co Ltd 005930.KS and Intel Corp INTC.O.

Although ASML’s financial performance has not yet been hurt by U.S.-China tensions, it could be affected by a split in the supply lines for semiconductor production, which is highly integrated globally.

The Dutch company had already halted plans to sell its most advanced equipment to China after the U.S. government pressured the Netherlands not to grant export licenses under “dual use” military applications.

Last month, Washington asked U.S. equipment makers to seek a license to ship any equipment to SMIC, China’s oldest and biggest computer chipmaker, over military concerns.

The new U.S. trade curbs on SMIC mean ASML must now apply for a license to sell even older-generation equipment to

10 Insights From Microsoft’s Latest IoT Signals Report

  • One in three enterprises is increasing their investments in IoT as a result of Covid-19.
  • 79% of enterprises adopting IoT see AI as either a core or a secondary component of their strategy.
  • 97% have security concerns when adopting IoT, with network-level security being most important (43%), followed by device track & management and endpoint security (both 38%).
  • Businesses adopting IoT believe they’ll see a 30% ROI on their IoT projects.

These and many other insights are from Microsoft’s IoT Signals Report, Edition 2, published on October 2nd. IoT Signals is published annually to provide Microsoft partners, customers and business leaders the insights and market intelligence they need to develop and launch IoT strategies.

This year, Microsoft commissioned the Hypothesis Group, an insights, design  and strategy agency to execute the IoT Signals Edition 2 research. More than 3,000 IoT decision-makers in enterprise organizations across the US, UK, Germany, France, China and Japan currently involved in IoT were interviewed. Please see page 4 for additional details on the methodology.

The top 10 key insights from Microsoft’s IoT Signals Report, Edition 2 include the following:

  • Enterprises’ IoT adoption surged in the last year from 85% to 91%. The survey found that 83% of adopters have at least one project that has achieved the use stage, which is 9% better than last year. Hypothesis Group and Microsoft found that IoT projects fall into four stages: learn, trial/POC, purchase and use. The study points out that more projects are in the purchase and use stages this year, with

Google abandoning a new Dublin office signals change

Google signage.

NurPhoto | Getty Images

When Google announced last month it was pulling the plug on a lease for a new office space in Dublin, Ireland, it set off alarm bells.

Google is a large presence in Dublin’s “Silicon Docks,” where it holds its European headquarters, a part of the city around the docklands area where a who’s who of Big Tech are located, including Facebook, Twitter and Airbnb.

But during the coronavirus pandemic and with the need for remote working, questions are being raised about the viability of large office spaces. Google said it remains committed to Dublin — where it has over 8,000 workers — and has purchased two more buildings that it still plans to fill.

The commercial property market in Dublin slumped in the second quarter as the country was in the depths of lockdown, according to real estate firm CBRE, which reported just 15 office leasing transactions in that period.

Marie Hunt, head of research at CBRE, told CNBC there is likely to be a slowdown in new office deals in the coming months because of Covid-19, but also because “tech occupiers tend to retrench in a presidential year.”

Government agencies have been unable to carry out site visits and tours to woo companies to invest, and Hunt said this was causing a “weakening in take up.”

Shane Fleming, a property expert and the founder of Fleming Real Estate, said that this trend is not unique to Dublin but that the Irish capital still has several large office deals signed and in progress, pointing to ongoing expansions by Amazon and LinkedIn. 

TikTok, according to reports, is seeking a large office space in the capital for up to 5,000 people.

Fleming added that housing shortages for workers in the city as well as planning policies