Amy Coney Barrett Memes Flood the Internet After She’s Asked to Hold Up Her Notepad

A particularly meme-able moment to come out of Tuesday’s Supreme Court confirmation hearing was when Senator John Cornyn asked Judge Amy Coney Barrett to share her notes with the room.



a person talking on a cell phone: Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett holds up an empty notepad before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. The moment was then taken and turned into various memes that were shared on the internet.


© Demetrius Freeman – Pool/Getty
Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett holds up an empty notepad before the Senate Judiciary Committee on the second day of her Supreme Court confirmation hearing on Capitol Hill on Tuesday in Washington, D.C. The moment was then taken and turned into various memes that were shared on the internet.

Cornyn, a Republican member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, told Barrett that senators had multiple notebooks, notes and books to reference during the hearing. Then, he asked if she could hold up the preparatory materials she was using to answer the committee’s questions, at which point she showed them a blank notepad save the Senate’s letterhead

“That’s impressive,” Cornyn said before continuing on with his other line of questioning.

As the internet often does, social media users capitalized on the moment to put their own spin on what transpired. Comedian Kathy Griffin, who’s butted heads with President Donald Trump on numerous occasions, posted a photo of Barrett with her notebook and said it was a photo of her “brain scan.”

For America, a right-wing digital activist organization, posted on Twitter a fake conversation between a Democratic senator and Barrett. They edited the pad of paper to read, “I know the cases you are bringing up better than you do,” as a response to a senator highlighting a court case during their questioning.

Another user going by the Twitter

She bootstrapped her company after facing bias. Now she’s helping others do the same.

This story originally ran on CNBC.com

Melissa Bradley’s mission to help women and people of color build their businesses stems from the hardships she faced as a young entrepreneur.

The 52-year-old, co-founder of the mentorship tech platform Ureeka and a Georgetown University professor, started her first company shortly after she graduated from college 30 years ago. The business’s mission was to provide financial literacy services to parents.

Bradley says that when she went to a government agency for a loan, she was told she had three strikes against her: She was Black, she was a woman and the person said she didn’t know any successful Black women in finance.

Bradley, who recently participated in the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation and CNBC + Acorns Invest in You’s “Rebuilding Better: A Virtual Town Hall for America’s Small & New Business Owners,” still managed to get her company off the ground. “I bootstrapped,” she recalled. “I kept my day job.”

She ultimately pivoted the business to provide billing and maintaining products and services for other financial advisors and, after a couple of years, sold the company.

“I was tired of the sexism and racism I was experiencing,” she said.

These days, Bradley is trying to bridge the gap between entrepreneurship and equity.

“All of these experiences made me realize that this is even harder for women and people of color because the market is not in our favor,” she said.

“It became super-important for me, even after I became an angel investor, to help people pave their way forward and really tackle the obstacles that are going to come their way.”

To that end, she co-founded 1863 Ventures, which accelerates what she calls “new majority” entrepreneurs — women and people of color — from high growth potential to high growth. These days her