John McAfee Arrested in Spain, and U.S. Seeks Extradition

John David McAfee, an antivirus software pioneer who fled Belize in 2012 ahead of a murder investigation there, has been arrested in Spain on tax evasion charges, the U.S. Justice Department said on Monday.

Mr. McAfee, 75, is a Silicon Valley legend who earned millions from the computer virus-fighting software company that still bears his surname. In 2012, he disappeared from his home in Belize after the local police sought him for questioning over the death of his neighbor.

He resurfaced in Guatemala City a few weeks later, then largely dropped out of the public eye for years — until 2016, when he attempted to run as a Libertarian candidate for president of the United States.

The Justice Department said on Monday that Mr. McAfee’s extradition from Spain to the United States was “pending.” It did not provide a timeline, and Mr. McAfee could not immediately be reached for comment on Tuesday.

Prosecutors accused Mr. McAfee of failing to file tax returns from 2014 to 2018, even as he earned millions from “promoting cryptocurrencies, consulting work, speaking engagements, and selling the rights to his life story for a documentary,” according to a June indictment in the U.S. court in Tennessee that the Justice Department unsealed on Monday.

The indictment said that Mr. McAfee evaded his tax liability by accepting payments through bank accounts and cryptocurrency exchange accounts that were set up by others. It also said that he tried to dodge the Internal Revenue Service by dealing extensively in cryptocurrency and buying assets — including real estate and a yacht — in other peoples’ names.

Each count of tax evasion carries a maximum prison sentence of five years, and each tax evasion count carries a maximum one year sentence.

A separate complaint, filed by the Securities and Exchange Commission on

Student seeks mayor’s aid to get gadget for online class


AN EDUCATION student belonging to a poor family in Capas town, Tarlac province has sought the help of Mayor Reynaldo Catacutan to get a new laptop for her online classes.

Erica Gracia personally wrote the mayor a letter explaining the economic status of their family.

She said her father used to work as a construction worker while her mother is a house help.

The student told Catacutan that her old phone is no longer reliable.

“Nahihirapan po kasi akong mag-online class dahil sa aking phone. Kailangan po kasi ng bawat oras o minuto ay hindi nakatanggal sa pagkaka-charge,” she said.

Gracia said she needs to use Zoom and Google Meet applications but her phone is not compatible.

The student added she has to borrow gadgets from her cousins and schoolmates just to submit her requirements.

“Minsan ay pinilit kong gamitin ang aking phone kaso nahila ko sa pagkaka-charge at dahil dun hindi po ako nakapagsubmit,” she said.

Catacutan immediately acquired a brand new laptop and donated it to Gracia.

The mayor stressed the need to support programs on education especially the scholarship of students belonging to poor families.

Catacutan recently distributed educational assistance to some 76 poor but deserving students of Capas town.

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U.S. expected to sue Google next week as DOJ seeks support from states

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. Justice Department is expected to sue Alphabet’s Google <GOOGL.O> as soon as next week, and is currently urging state attorneys general to sign onto the lawsuit, according to three sources familiar with the process.

The lawsuit is expected to accuse Google, builder of the world’s dominant search engine, of looking to disadvantage rivals such as Microsoft’s Bing by depriving them of the data about users and user preferences that they need to improve and to advertise to people.

The Justice Department has also been investigating Google’s “search advertising,” the ads that appear under a search box if a person looks up a consumer item like “dishwasher.” Google controls the sale of the space under these searches, as well as the tools to make those ad sales.

Google has repeatedly denied any wrongdoing. The Justice Department declined to comment.

Regarding search, Google has said users have access to other information sources, like Twitter for news and Amazon for products. In advertising, it says it competes with a large array of companies, including Oracle <ORCL.N> and Verizon <VZ.N>.

State attorneys general, many of whom are already investigating other Google businesses, are in the process of considering whether to sign on to the federal lawsuit, the sources said.

The lawsuit would be the first real blow to fall after the Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission said last year they had opened antitrust investigations of Google, Facebook <FB.O>, Amazon <AMZN.O> and Apple <AAPL.O>. Progressive Democrats have praised the effort.

Separately, President Donald Trump’s administration has said social media companies, including Google’s YouTube, have stifled conservative voices.

(Reporting by Diane Bartz, Paresh Dave and Karen Freifeld; Editing by Tom Hogue)

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