Delhi HC directs petitioner seeking fiber line for internet in Delhi courts to make representation

New Delhi [India], October 12 (ANI): The Delhi High Court on Monday, while hearing a petition seeking directions to install a fiber line for internet in Delhi courts for effective virtual hearing, asked the petitioners to make a representation before the departments concerned first.

A division bench of Chief Justice DN Patel and Justice Prateek Jalan disposed of the plea with a direction that representation is made to the concerned authorities like the Building Maintenance Committee (BMC), High Court of Delhi, District Judge (HQ), and concerned service providers of the cellular network.

The bench, while appreciating the cause raised in the petition, said that firstly the issues raised in the petition should be decided on the administrative side and if they failed to do so, then the court would interfere in the matter.

The plea sought directions to the respondents to take necessary steps on an urgent basis to install the fiber cables in all court complexes inclusive of chamber premises situated in the Delhi courts.

The plea, filed by Satyanarain Sharma, a practicing advocate and is former Secretary of Rohini Court Bar Association (RCBA), said that due to the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic along with the nationwide lockdown the judicial administration dealt in its own way by deferring regular hearing of all cases and confining hearing only for urgent cases by video conferencing.

Nowadays the judicial system started hearing the cases through video conferencing (VC) in all courts of the country to administer the justice delivery system, the plea said.

It sought the indulgence of the court regarding the problem faced by judges, lawyers and litigants due to poor/lack of internet connectivity. The majority of lawyers are facing the problem of poor/non- availability of internet in the chamber blocks situated in court complexes, which has resulted in grave hardship to

Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei – Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: A Huawei company logo is pictured at the Shenzhen International Airport in Shenzhen, Guangdong province, China, July 22, 2019. REUTERS/Aly Song/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face risk to their earnings.

Kioxia warned that U.S. curbs on Huawei could trigger memory chip oversupply and lower prices. It recently shelved a plan for a multi-billion dollar listing as U.S-China tensions cloud the global chip market.

A Sony spokeswoman said the company was in compliance with all regulations, but could not comment on particular clients.

A Kioxia spokesman also declined to comment.

Reporting by Makiko Yamazaki, Ju-min Park; Editing by Dan Grebler

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Seeking civility in groups as views clash on Facebook

As division roils the country ahead of the US presidential election, Justine Lee is out to “Make America Dinner Again” and foster understanding in the process.

The creator of the private Facebook group by that name faces the challenge of keeping conversation civil at a social network criticized as a cauldron of toxicity.

MADA was started when Lee, who lives in New York’s Bronx borough, and a friend were stunned by the outcome of the 2016 presidential election and began holding dinner parties to bring together people with opposing political viewpoints.

The dinners caught on. After the coronavirus pandemic struck and prevented face-to-face gatherings, MADA went virtual with a Facebook group.

The group has not shied away from hot-button discussion topics including race, police brutality and abortion.

While Facebook relies on automated systems and user reports to filter out unacceptable vitriol, groups have human moderators who can reject posts or turn off comments if discussions go off the rails.

Rather than Facebook or its chief Mark Zuckerberg deciding what is acceptable, groups outline their own standards.

“It is clear that these are the norms that we’ve agreed to as a group, and if you don’t agree with them or you can’t adhere to them, you’re out,” Lee said.

“I feel like the rest of the internet is just too big to be like that.”

MADA has around 850 members and a dozen moderators – six of them politically left-leaning and six right-leaning.

– The future is private –

Facebook — which with more than 2.7 billion monthly users is the leading social network — has been trying to shake off its image as a dangerously sprawling platform by emphasizing private communications and small groups.

“As the world gets bigger and more connected, we need that sense of intimacy more than

Japan’s Sony and Kioxia seeking U.S. approval to supply to Huawei: Nikkei

FILE PHOTO: The Huawei logo is seen at the IFA consumer technology fair, amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Berlin, Germany September 3, 2020. REUTERS/Michele Tantussi/File Photo

TOKYO (Reuters) – Japan’s Sony Corp and memory chipmaker Kioxia Holdings Corp have applied for U.S. approval to continue supplying Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, Nikkei reported on Sunday.

If confirmed, the move follows other tech companies such as Intel Corp that recently received licences from U.S. authorities.

With U.S.-China ties at their worst in decades, Washington has been pushing governments around to world to squeeze out Huawei, arguing that the telecoms giant would transfer data to the Chinese government for espionage.

Huawei is one of the top customers for Sony’s image sensors for smartphones. Kioxia Holdings Corp is the world’s No. 2 maker of flash memory chips and a Huawei supplier.

Nikkei here said without U.S. licenses, Sony and Kioxia would face risk to their earnings.

Kioxia warned that U.S. curbs on Huawei could trigger memory chip oversupply and lower prices. It recently shelved a plan for a multi-billion dollar listing as U.S-China tensions cloud the global chip market.

A Sony spokeswoman said the company was in compliance with all regulations, but could not comment on particular clients.

A Kioxia spokesman also declined to comment.

Reporting by Makiko Yamazaki, Ju-min Park; Editing by Dan Grebler

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