Microsoft Scores Another Windows 10 ARM Success

I’m told there was an Apple event today. I’m told it was one of the biggest moments of its year. Yet the event was for this year’s tweak of the iPhone, not Apples’s big moment of innovation. That’s coming later this year, when Tim Cook’s team reveal a new MacBook that will be running on ARM-based architecture, rather than Intel. While some hand-picked developers have had access to a Developer Transition Kit, presumably under heavy NDA, the project has been shrouded in darkness, with only the occasional leak of online benchmarks and to-be-expected hyperbole from the geekerati.

It’s in stark contrast to Microsoft’s approach.

With far less pomp and circumstances, the Windows 10 on ARM project made another step today. For some it will be seen as a very important step, unlocking the full power of the ARM platform. For others it will be seen as something that should have been done before consumer devices were available, especially Microsofts own Surface Pro X.

Today saw the release of the ARM-compiled version of Microsoft Teams.

This is not a review of Microsoft Teams. I’m not even going to touch on the application, beyond noting that it is one of Microsoft’s applications that many enterprises and organisations regard as a key application, and it integrates through Microsoft clouds to mobiles, tablets, browser, and dedicated applications on multiple platforms. It’s about Microsoft’s open nature as it develops the Windows 10 on ARM platform.

Last year’s launch of the Surface Pro X put the Windows 10 on ARM project front and centre. Consumers could buy the 2-in-1 and use it in

Robin Hood foundation scores Wall Street support for nonprofits

CEO of The Robin Hood Foundation, Wes Moore, speaks during The Robin Hood Foundation’s 2018 benefit at Jacob Javitz Center on May 14, 2018 in New York City.

Kevin Mazur | Getty Images

One of Wall Street’s favorite charitable organizations has raised several million dollars to support a fund that invests in nonprofit groups run by people of color. 

The Robin Hood foundation’s Power Fund kicked off this summer as the coronavirus pandemic spread and amid nationwide protests sparked by the police killing of George Floyd on Memorial Day.  

Robin Hood funds over 200 poverty-fighting programs in New York City. It is led by Wes Moore, an author and former investment banker at Citigroup.

“I think part of the thing we’ve seen is that everything we’ve witnessed post George Floyd, these aren’t new things because of George Floyd,” Moore told CNBC. “I think that the conversations we’ve been able to have with — whether they be donors or CEOs of companies — is about the more we look into the patterns and practices that we had even prior to all this, the more it just highlights that we have to move with a sense of urgency.”

Robin Hood’s board is full of Wall Street leaders, including chairman John Griffin, who was once a hedge fund manager; and the group’s vice chair, Dina Powell McCormick, an executive at Goldman Sachs. David Solomon, Goldman Sachs’ CEO, is also a board member.

Robin Hood’s latest 990 disclosure form shows that it raised almost $140 million in 2018 through contributions and grants. The group raised nearly $130 million the prior year.

The Power Fund, which has raised over $6 million on top of the seed money provided by the Robin Hood Foundation, has moved to support five organizations including America on Tech, which runs