Computer Science Major Credits MCC for Helping to Find Path

At Middlesex Community College, Sam Holmes is preparing for his future. His three favorite parts about his experience at Middlesex so far have been networking with his classmates, tapping into the resources the college offers, and pursuing his passion. MCC is setting him up for success.

A Computer Science major expecting to graduate in January 2022, Holmes is from Billerica and chose MCC because it is affordable and close to home. After graduating from Middlesex, he plans to transfer to a four-year school to become a Computer Systems Engineer.

Courses such as his Introduction to Programming course with MCC Professor Sanaz Rahimi and Trigonometry for Engineering and Science with Lengchivon Kou have helped him understand how much he enjoys his major and future career.

Holmes is grateful for all of the hard work and dedication he has received from his other professors, including Linda Miller, Lance Solimini, Mike Williamson, Gordon Curry, Aliza Miller and Sylvia Yeung.

As the pandemic caused Middlesex to transition most courses and student services to online formats since the Spring 2020 semester, Holmes has been adjusting to online learning. A self-described “computer geek,” he finds MCC’s online classes to be user friendly.

“My experience with online courses has been going pretty smoothly,” he said. “The ability to plan out my courses using the syllabus and course schedule and knowing when my assignments and projects are all due really help me with planning all of this out.”

Holmes is also taking a few of MCC’s Mini-mester courses, which allows him to complete the same high-quality content, number of credits and instructional hours as a 15-week course in just eight weeks. While there is a lot of work to balance, Holmes has figured out how to best manage his schedule and believes the accelerated classes are useful.

He

Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science | News

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Tufts University School of Engineering is collaborating with Noodle Partners, a leading online program manager (OPM), to launch a new online Master of Science in Data Science program and a Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. The programs are expected to launch in January 2021 with classes beginning in Fall 2021. 

“We are laser focused on building online programs that help meet the growing demand for data and computer scientists.”

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning landscape,

Tufts University to Add New Online Master’s in Data Science and Post Baccalaureate in Computer Science

The Master of Science program in Data Science is designed to prepare students who have earned bachelor’s degrees in STEM fields for advanced careers in data analysis and data-intensive science. The program focuses on statistics and machine learning, with courses in data infrastructure and systems, data analysis and interfaces, and theoretical elements. 

The Post-Baccalaureate program in Computer Science is open to individuals with at least a bachelor’s degree in any discipline (BA or BS) and one college-level introductory computer course. The program is particularly well-suited for individuals preparing to re-enter the workforce, mid-level professionals looking to move into the field of computer science, and those preparing for graduate school. 

The Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering jointly administer the Master of Science in Data Science, while the Department of Computer Science offers the Post-Baccalaureate in Computer Science. Students may apply to the post-baccalaureate program or to the post-baccalaureate/master’s combined program in Computer Science. 

“Building on the success of our recently launched Master of Science in Computer Science program with Noodle last fall, these two new programs in Data Science and Computer Science will help meet the soaring global demand for data engineers and computer scientists,” said Jianmin Qu, Dean of the Tufts University School of Engineering and Karol Family Professor. “In this fast-changing learning landscape, Tufts provides students with a collaborative, community-based environment to meet industry’s rapidly-expanding need for innovative team members with advanced analytical capabilities.”

“Noodle is thrilled to continue our support for Tufts, and we are honored to play a role  in realizing Tufts’ commitment to expand its excellent engineering education to the online realm,” Lee Bradshaw, Chief

9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)

Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an AP test in the subject.


More from DA: Why a district launched a middle school for African American girls


And even though female students remain underrepresented in high school computer science courses, the number of students taking AP computer science exams has been growing rapidly, the report found.

Disparities would be better illuminated if schools measured disparities by determining computer science participation by students’ specific race, ethnicity and economic status, rather than by the general term “underrepresented minorities,” the report found.

The report also recommended nine policies states and districts can implement to provide equitable access to computer science:

  • Create a state plan for K–12 computer science
  • Define computer science and establish rigorous K–12 computer science standards
  • Allocate funding for rigorous computer science teacher professional learning and course support
  • Implement clear certification pathways for computer science teachers
  • Create programs at institutions of higher education to offer computer science to

Virtual Conference Inspires Female Computer Science Students

If women are underrepresented in computer science (and they are, by a large margin), you wouldn’t know it from sitting in on the Grace Hopper Celebration. Each fall, for the last 20 years, tens of thousands of women have converged for a long weekend of collaboration, networking, mentoring and commemoration of their contributions to the tech world.

COVID-19 pushed this fall’s convention into a virtual format, but it didn’t prevent the University of Denver’s Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science from sending 26 students (plus seven faculty and one staff member) for free. A private donor and funds from the school’s diversity, equity and inclusion budget covered the costs.

In interviews via email and Zoom, the DU Newsroom asked Anndi Russell, a graduate student in the data science program; Izzy Johnson, an undergraduate pursuing a BS in computer science; and Scott Leutenegger, a computer science professor and the Ritchie School’s director of inclusive excellence, about their experience

What’s it like for each of you as a woman in computer science?

Anndi Russell: My program is more equal in terms of women and men than is true in the larger computing world. But before this, I worked in education for a few years — which is a very female-heavy industry typically — so I know switching into computer science and the tech world is going to be a little different. I’m grateful for having a lot of female classmates right now and people I’ve connected with. We support each other.

Izzy Johnson: As an undergrad, I think I was surprised by how many women were in my classes, but it’s definitely still weighted the other way. At DU specifically, I’ve really enjoyed how many female professors I’ve had. I’ve had some really influential female professors in the Ritchie School.

Scott,