9 ways to expand computer science equity in high school

Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught

(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)(GettyImages/Hill Street Studios)

Almost half of U.S. high schools now teach at least one computer science course. That means, however, students at a majority of high schools don’t have access to computer science, according to a new report.

And Black, Latinx and Native American students are less likely to attend a school where computer science is taught, according to “State of Computer Science Education: Illuminating Disparities” by Code.org, the Computer Science Teachers Association, and the Expanding Computing Education Pathways Alliance.

Students from rural areas and economically disadvantaged backgrounds are also less likely to have a chance to take computer science.

Students in these underrepresented groups are also less likely than are white and Asian American teeens to attend a school that offers an advanced placement computer science course or to an AP test in the subject.


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And even though female students remain underrepresented in high school computer science courses, the number of students taking AP computer science exams has been growing rapidly, the report found.

Disparities would be better illuminated if schools measured disparities by determining computer science participation by students’ specific race, ethnicity and economic status, rather than by the general term “underrepresented minorities,” the report found.

The report also recommended nine policies states and districts can implement to provide equitable access to computer science:

  • Create a state plan for K–12 computer science
  • Define computer science and establish rigorous K–12 computer science standards
  • Allocate funding for rigorous computer science teacher professional learning and course support
  • Implement clear certification pathways for computer science teachers
  • Create programs at institutions of higher education to offer computer science to

Suspect accused of computer theft at Arlington middle school

Arlington police officers arrested a suspect for allegedly breaking into Post Middle School and stealing computers early Monday morning. (Arlington Police Department)

Arlington police officers arrested a suspect for allegedly breaking into Post Middle School and stealing computers early Monday morning. (Arlington Police Department)

Police responded early Monday and reportedly found the alleged thief with “his arms full of computers.”

ARLINGTON — Police arrested a person accused of trying to steal computers from Post Middle School in Arlington early Monday morning.

An alarm sent the Arlington Police Department to the school. Responding officers saw a flashlight shining in a classroom.

“While waiting for a K-9 to respond, a subject exited the building with his arms full of computers,” according to a post on the Arlington Police Department’s Facebook page. “The subject tried to run but was easily apprehended.”

Multiple classroom doors were breached, causing significant damage, the post said.

Jail records show the suspect was booked into the Snohomish County Jail around 3 a.m. for suspicion of second-degree burglary and second-degree theft, plus a few other offenses.

This Michigan school is deploying Wi-Fi buses to families without internet

JACKSON, MI – With around 35% of students unable to afford or have access to internet service, Jackson Public Schools Superintendent Jeff Beal knew he had to do something to help with remote learning during the COVID-19 pandemic.

So, Wi-Fi service is on its way to those students via the district’s school bus fleet, allowing families free internet access to connect their devices to on days they aren’t participating in face-to-face school.

JPS spent $65,000 to outfit its full fleet of 52 buses with Wi-Fi hot spots. It’s deploying 15 of them into Jackson neighborhoods with high concentrations of families that can’t afford internet access.

Beal calls this initial deployment a “proof of concept,” with the idea that JPS might need to use all of its buses if moving entirely to remote learning is required because an entire building is put into quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’re doing it today to build it out to make certain that we’re ready for tomorrow,” Beal said. “A lot of this is trying to predict what might happen or what might be needed. We want to make certain that we have the ability to make sure all kids have access to be able to continue their education.”

JPS will begin sending buses out to neighborhoods surrounding downtown, with a couple east of downtown and one near the airport, the week of Oct. 12.

The district currently offers a hybrid learning format with two different student groups attending school in-person during different days of the week to avoid exposure to each other.

While the district has made a point to send students home after two days of face-to-face learning, with lessons uploaded to their devices, live online interaction is a key component students without internet access are missing out on during the rest

Brunswick Area Historical Society fundraiser is anything but ‘old school’

BRUNSWICK, Ohio — As the summer harvest began to wane at the Brunswick Farmers Market, some new ideas cropped up to help the nonprofit Brunswick Area Historical Society in its efforts to raise funds for its nearly completed “old school” building.

With large-crowd fundraisers stymied by COVID-19, and even many of the usual summer activities curtailed this year, fundraising was painfully slow.

That’s when a new vendor at the markets this year, Stacey Asvestas, stepped in to see if she could help.

Once she heard that the historical society needed to raise money for the building that will house 200 years of Brunswick school artifacts, she jumped into action.

Actually, she skated into action.

Asvestas roller-skated around Heritage Farm from her vendor’s spot this summer, so she skated to each of the vendors at the market and asked if they would contribute to an auction. Because the market season was almost over, she suggested an online auction.

Then, she worked with Ken Chamers, the historical society’s internet guru, to start the auction of items donated by the many vendors and other members of the community.

The first one-week auction started on Monday, Oct. 5 — the day following the last farmers market. The hope is to take the auctions through to the Christmas shopping season — and maybe beyond, she said.

Although Asvestas is new to the farmers market, she is no stranger to the area; she grew up in Valley City and is a Buckeye High School graduate. She is the mother of three and has two grandchildren.

While her children were young, she bought and sold classic cars. She also worked part-time at Miss Molly’s Tea Room in Medina for 15 years. She then formed a 501c(3) nonprofit organization.

“It’s a musical ministry — helping at-risk young people

Early School Supplies & Gadget Deals Reviewed by Deal Tomato

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For two days, Prime members enjoy access to great deals on school supplies for teachers, K-12 students, and college students during the shopping event. Amazon’s best deals for teachers and students cover a wide range of educational gear – from classroom technology and tablets to school supplies and classroom furniture. The rise of remote learning and virtual teaching makes video and audio gear like Logitech webcams and Fire HD tablets increasingly important for teachers looking to improve the quality of their online classes.

College students are also on the hunt for smart educational devices, with iPads and Chromebooks often featuring high on the list of back-to-school essentials. Given the uncertainty surrounding in-person classes, having an