Company Reaffirms Ryzen 5000 Support On 400-Series Chipsets

Motherboard manufacturer Asus has confirmed it’s 400-series chipset motherboards will still support AMD’s new Ryzen 5000-series Zen 3 CPUs.

The company was forced to issue a statement today following a supposed slip up by one of its customer service representatives. In a post on Reddit, one user claims to have been told by Asus that the company would not be releasing new BIOS versions for its older 400-series chipset motherboards to allow them to work with Zen 3 CPUs such as the Ryzen 9 5950X. As a result, owners of said boards would not be able to upgrade their CPUs.

Instead, the representative suggested purchasing a newer motherboard to replace the user’s premium X470 model. AMD has been quite clear that X470 motherboards would support Ryzen 5000 CPUs and recently confirmed that motherboard manufacturers were working on BIOS versions accordingly, with 400-series boards receiving these via downloads in early 2021.

Asus exact statement I received today goes as follows:

“…ASUS will follow AMD’s support plan to release a new BIOS on X470, B450 and B450 II motherboards and all those available in the market at present will also be compatible with that BIOS upgrade. Beta BIOS support, following AMD guidelines and timelines means this will be ready to roll out around Jan 2021.

[we will confirm] closer to the time if certain units need to be upgraded with a previous CPU but all new ASUS B450 II motherboards will come with USB Bios Flashback so you’ll be able to get a new CPU and upgrade the BIOS straight away without posting with a previous generation CPU.”

With AMD’s Ryzen 5000 CPUs offering huge performance boosts according the company, this will likely come as welcome news to anyone that saw the Reddit post and

AMD Reveals “World’s Best Gaming CPU” With Ryzen 5000 Series

AMD has officially revealed its slate of Zen 3-powered desktop CPUs, skipping the 4000 series and jumping right into the new Ryzen 5000 series. The company revealed 4 new CPUs in total, boasting that the Ryzen 5900 is now the “world’s best gaming CPU.”

The big difference with the new Zen 3 architecture is the increase in instructions per cycle, letting CPUs with the same core frequencies and core counts perform a lot better. Compared to Zen 2, which powers the current Ryzen 3000 series, Zen 3 achieves 19% more IPC, converting to an average of nearly 26% more performance in gaming alone when moving to the Ryzen 5000 series.

The jump between generations alone is massive, but it’s Intel’s gaming crown that AMD really aimed for during the presentation. The flagship of the Ryzen 5000 series, the Ryzen 3950X, doesn’t match the Intel Core i9-10900K in sheer single-core speed (4.9Ghz vs. Intel’s peak of 5.3GHz), but AMD’s own benchmarks in a suite of games show the Ryzen inching ahead in most scenarios where the CPU is the bottleneck. Those results will need to be verified in real-world use, but if they hold, it’s a big blow to Intel which only has new CPUs launching early in 2021.

One area where the Ryzen 5000 series won’t be competing with Intel is price. AMD isn’t aiming to be the best CPUs on the market and undercut the competition, with prices across the board matching those of Intel counterparts. The entire Ryzen 5000 range is $50 more for like-for-like upgrades, but just like before, AMD is promising backwards compatibility with motherboards via a firmware update. That means you can slot your new Zen 3 CPU into your system without having to replace anything else, making the price increase a little easier to