Nvidia CEO anticipates supply shortages for the RTX 3080 and 3090 to last until 2021

If you are looking to get your hands on an Nvidia RTX 3080 or 3090 graphics card, you’re probably going to have to wait until 2021. Nvidia CEO Jensen Huang announced today that the company expects shortages for both graphics cards will continue to for the remainder of the year, Tom’s Hardware and Wccftech reports.

During a Q&A with press to cover its GTC announcements, Huang responded to the continuous shortages for both graphics cards. “I believe that demand will outstrip all of our supply through the year,” Huang said.

The RTX 3080 and 3090 had extremely rough launches, with both cards selling out within minutes of preorders going live, but Huang says the issue is not with supply but rather the demand of both GPUs.

“Even if we knew about all the demand, I don’t think it’s possible to have ramped that fast,” Huang said. “We’re ramping really really hard. Yields are great, the product’s shipping fantastically, it’s just getting sold out instantly.” Nvidia has apologized for the launch of the RTX 3080 and the limited supply of the cards.

Nvidia has one more card in the RTX 3000 series it plans to launch this year: the $499 RTX 3070. Nvidia pushed the release date to October 29th in the hopes that the company can work with retailers to get the cards to more customers on launch day. But if it is anything like the last two launches, it’s going to be chaotic.

Of course, if you are determined to buy a new graphics card this year, you may want to see what AMD reveals on October 28th. The company is hosting a GPU event to reveal the Radeon RX 6000

Nvidia Has Delayed The GeForce RTX 3070 Retail Launch

Nvidia’s GeForce RTX 3090 and RTX 3080 graphics cards have launched to critical praise but frustratingly scarce availability. In an effort to curb further consumer frustration, Nvidia has decided to delay availability of its upcoming RTX 3070 to October 29 from its original launch date of October 15.

For those of you paying attention to the next-gen graphics card war, yes, that is exactly one day after AMD’s scheduled RX 6000 Series announcement on October 28.

The ever-watchful eyes over at VideoCardz noticed the stealthy change on Nvidia’s GTX 3070 landing page.

Nvidia later issued the following statement:

“Production of GeForce RTX 3070 graphics cards are ramping quickly. We’ve heard from many of you that there should be more cards available on launch day. To help make that happen, we are updating the availability date to Thursday, October 29th. We know this may be disappointing to those eager to purchase a GeForce RTX 3070 as soon as possible, however this shift will help our global partners get more graphics cards into the hands of gamers on launch day.”

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I’m sure there are some tinfoil hats out there speculating that Nvidia executed this delay to throw a monkey wrench into AMD’s RX 6000 launch plans. I disagree, and this is an absolute win for consumers.

With the RTX 3070 selling for a $499 MSRP and allegedly delivering faster gaming performance than the RTX 2080 Ti (which launched at an eye-watering $999), it’s a foregone conclusion that demand will be high.

Fortunately for AMD, this gives Team Red just enough time to convince people to wait for its

Nvidia’s Bad News About GeForce RTX 3070 Good News For AMD Radeon RX6000 Series

KEY POINTS

  • Nvidia launched the GeForce RTX 3080 and RTX 3090 a few weeks ago
  • Earlier, the chipmaker announced a piece of disappointing news about the GeForce RTX 3070
  • Nvidia’s bad news could very well benefit the AMD Radeon RX 6000 series

Just a few weeks after the launch of the GeForce RTX 3080 and GeForce RTX 3090 graphics cards, Nvidia announced that the retail launch of the GeForce RTX 3070 would be delayed until the end of October.

In a most recent update, Nvidia confirmed that the retail launch of the GeForce RTX 3070 would be delayed for a couple of weeks. The graphics card was initially scheduled to launch on October 15 but now the chipmaker is saying that it will be available in stores starting October 29. Nvidia claimed that it decided to push the retail launch to ensure that more graphics cards will be available during the launch day.

Nvidia acknowledged that the announcement would be disappointing to fans who are eager to buy the GeForce RTX 3070 as soon as possible. “This shift will help our global partners get more graphics cards into the hands of gamers on launch day,” the company explained. It appears that there are no changes in the specs of Nvidia’s upcoming graphics card.

The new retail launch of the Nvidia GeForce RTX 3070 falls a day after the AMD Radeon RX 6000 series’s official unveiling. Consumers can wait for the launch of the official specs of AMD’s graphics cards and compare it with that of Nvidia’s. Based on earlier leaks, the GeForce RTX 3070 is the weakest of the latest 30 series cards from Nvidia.

Here’s why PC builders are demanding to know how many capacitors are in the RTX 3080

Following multiple reports of third-party Nvidia RTX 3080 cards crashing, PC builders are now trying to figure out how many capacitors are in their new GPU.

That’s right: capacitors. On Friday, concerned buyers stumbled upon one theory for the crashes: a site called Igor’s Lab speculated that Nvidia’s partners were cheaping out on the capacitors used in their third-party RTX 3080s. And over the weekend, that theory spread: numerous outlets cited Igor’s Lab to publish headlines like “NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Stability Woes Traced To Cheap Capacitors” and “Capacitor issues are causing RTX 3080/3090 crashes.”

A day later, it appeared there might actually be some evidence that capacitors could have caused the cards to crash. EVGA weighed in on the RTX 3080 capacitor controversy on Saturday, citing its own issues with the capacitor layout it originally used in its RTX 3080 cards, although the company claims it never shipped the original layout to customers. In that note, EVGA explained that while a design with six POSCAPs “cannot pass the real world applications testing,” it later tried a design with four POSCAPs and 20 MLCC caps that worked better.

As Tom’s Hardware explains, there are typically two types of capacitors found underneath a modern GPU’s chip: MLCC and POSCAPS. Both capacitors reportedly have pros and cons; MLCC is smaller but performs better at higher clock speeds. POSCAPS are larger but are not as good when running at high clock speeds.

At this point, we don’t actually know whether capacitors are causing these crashes, but the demand has certainly gotten the industry to respond: MSI, Gigabyte, and Zotac have all issued statements claiming the capacitors are not the problem, and that new Nvidia drivers can address any stability

New Nvidia RTX 3080 Teardown Reveals A Potential Problem [UPDATED]

If you’re one of the lucky few who scored an Nvidia RTX 3080 before stock was decimated and snatched up by bots, congratulations! Hopefully that purchase didn’t leave you with buyer’s remorse, because an increasing number of early adopters are reporting that their shiny new RTX 3080 graphics cards are crashing to the desktop in the middle of various gaming sessions.

VideoCardz was the first English language site to report that several 3rd-party, factory-overclocked RTX 3080 models from ZOTAC, MSI, Gigabyte and others are exhibiting unexplained crashes or severe graphical artifacts while gaming. Since then the problem has become more widespread, with complaints mounting on sites like Reddit, LinusTechTips and Nvidia’s own forums.

What’s The Problem, Exactly?

In a nutshell: when the affected models reach a boost GPU clock speed of 2.0GHz or higher, the card crashes to the desktop.

Igor’s LAB published a fascinating investigative report that found a pattern among the the models that users are reporting problems with: an array of cheaper capacitors.

Each RTX 3080 has six capacitors on the back of the GPU which are used for filtering voltages and delivering “clean” power. The Igor’s LAB report explains how various combinations of cheaper (POPSCAPs) and more expensive (MLCCs) capacitors are used on some models.

The “problem cards” tend to use more of the cheaper POSCAPs (highlighted in red below) instead of the more expensive MLCCs (highlighted in green below).

Two worthwhile notes here before we move on: First, Nvidia’s own Founders Edition cards are not exhibiting these issues (possibly because Nvidia uses a combination of capacitors).

Second, the teardown shows that the ASUS TUF RTX 3080 uses