Commercially Available Silicon Quantum Computer Moves Forward With Quietest Bits On Record

KEY POINTS

  • Physicists achieve a noise level 10 times lower than the previous record
  • Demonstration proves to take a major step closer to a full-scale silicon quantum processor 
  • Next step could be a 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023

The lowest noise level on record for a semiconductor quantum bit has been demonstrated by a team of quantum physicists, bringing the development of a commercially available silicon quantum computer one step forward to possibility. 

In a study published in Advanced Materials, the physicists said they were able to achieve a noise level 10 times lower than previously recorded for any semiconductor qubit. Specifically, they demonstrated a low-level charge noise of  S0 = 0.0088 ± 0.0004 μeV2 Hz−1. 

As a next step, the team is now looking forward to demonstrating the capability required to produce a reliable 10-qubit prototype quantum integrated processor by 2023. 

“Our team is now working towards delivering all of these key results on a single device – fast, stable, high fidelity and with long coherence times – moving a major step closer to a full-scale quantum processor in silicon,” Michelle Simmons, director for Center for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) and Scientia professor of quantum physics in the Faculty of Science at the University of New South Wales, said in a press release. 

The team explained that, for a silicon quantum computer to perform reliable and applicable solutions, it should generate quantum information close to 100% accuracy. However, achieving such accuracy was impossible due to what physicists call charge noise. 

Imperfections in the material environment that hosts qubits result in charge noise. It impedes the proper encoding of information on qubits, affecting the information accuracy altogether. By separating the qubits from the surface and interface states, the team was able to demonstrate the lowest noise

Bliss Drive Media Is Making Moves In The SEO Agency Business

Irvine, California – ( NewMediaWire ) – October 2, 2020 – Bliss Drive Media, an SEO, and digital marketing company offers top-notch SEO services. The company assists organizations and websites in increasing their SERP (Search Engine Result Page) rankings and overall traffic. 

Bliss Drive, led by Richard Fong, an industry-expert, promises comprehensive marketing services to all their customers. As a website’s digital marketing partner, Bliss Drive offers quantifiable results that aim at more than mere online exposure.  

Richard Fong, the Founder-CEO, believes that result-driven SEO strategies are capable of helping increase a website’s online presence. His company is centered around the primary goal of acquiring better customers to eventually boost sales and profits.

What Does Richard Fong’s Bliss Drive Offer? 

Richard Fong ’s brainchild, the Bliss Drive, focuses on offering customers an assortment of SEO-related services. From targeted keyword searches, website structuring, and link building to blog curation and in-depth market analysis, Bliss Drive provides more than ordinary SEO services. 

Bliss Drive has expressed concerns over several marketing agencies resorting to outdated SEO practices like SEO stuffing, content spamming, thin content, and content cloaking to impress customers.  

However, Richard Fong thought of it with prospects in mind. He believes that SEO is as dynamic as Google’s algorithms. Thus, it is beyond necessary to work upon the following essential elements: 

● Boosting Conversions 

● Driving Traffic 

● Gaining Authority 

● Increasing Revenue 

● Achieving Low Bounce Rates 

Fong says that if these factors are achieved, the website is bound to rank high on Google’s SERPs.

Richard Fong: All you Need to Know about the Founder and CEO  

Richard Fong, an SEO-expert who has studied, analyzed, has worked in the SEO domain for over a decade. Moreover, he has very dynamic and futuristic views on SEO. His views are purely experience

Google Project Zero security researcher moves to Apple

A researcher who worked for Google’s Project Zero is departing the security team and moving over to Apple, to help the iPhone maker improve the security of iOS and its other operating systems.

Revealed on Twitter on Saturday, Brandon Azad confirmed he was leaving Project Zero in favor of a position at Apple in the following week. He will be joining Apple to “continue my work improving Apple device security.”

Project Zero is Google’s security research team that concentrates on finding security issues and vulnerabilities in software, both in Google’s own products and of other major firms. The team works to improve the security of devices and software the general public uses by pointing out the issues to device producers, before performing an ethical disclosure of its findings.

This includes a collection of zero-click bugs in Apple’s Image I/O framework affecting all of Apple’s major platforms, and discovering exploits in hacked websites targeting iPhones.

Azad is known for his work on iOS issues, and has been credited in Apple’s patch notes for both iOS and macOS releases multiple times. By moving to Apple, Azad may be able to assist in plugging some of the security holes he finds externally before they get discovered by research teamd like Project Zero.

In tweets, Azad calls his time at Project Zero “amazing” and says it’s “been an honor to share in this wonderful mission.” His teammates were among “the kindest and smartest people I’ve met, and I’ve learned so

China’s carbon target moves big economies into radical climate consensus

emissions
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

After a week of far-reaching climate promises measured over decades, four of the world’s six largest economies have now proposed ending dates for their carbon emissions.


President Xi Jinping’s surprise announcement at the annual United Nations climate meeting this week committed China to reaching carbon neutrality by 2060. That brings the third-biggest economy by nominal GDP into a loose but vitally important consensus with the second largest (EU), fourth largest (Japan) and fifth largest (California). The end of emissions has been set even if the target dates remain varied—and at least a generation into the future.

Every new country that joins this carbon-neutral group puts more pressure on holdouts to align their policies with global goals. Two of the biggest economies remain outside of the consensus: India, at No. 6, and the national U.S. economy that remains the largest by size and historical contribution to warming.

“We aim to have CO2 emissions peak before 2030 and achieve carbon neutrality before 2060,” Xi declared by video conference last week at the U.N. General Assembly, without providing details on what neutrality will mean in practice. But the mere fact of the pledge by China keeps alive the chance that the world may be able to hit the most ambitious target set under the 2015 Paris climate agreement: holding warming below 1.5 degrees Celsius compared to preindustrial levels. Current global average is around 1 degree C of warming.

“If China’s emissions didn’t go to zero, then 1.5 would not have been an option,” said Glen Peters, research director at the Center for International Climate Research. The fact remains that China, as the world’s biggest emitter and energy consumer currently, exerts enormous pull on the prospects for limiting future warming. And falling short of the 1.5 degree C target