Here’s where overseas and military voters can return ballots online

  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Reliable online voting for everyone will, in all likelihood, never be a reality, experts say. But in 2020, many states give military and overseas voters the option to transmit their absentee ballots online. 

Members of the Armed Services and their families, diplomats, and private United States citizens living abroad all have the right to vote absentee in federal elections under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA), a law first passed in the 1980s and further expanded with the MOVE Act, which was passed by Congress in 2009.

Voters covered under UOCAVA have the option to request a ballot for every election in a given year, have that ballot mailed to them no later than 45 days before the election, return it without needing to pay postage, and also have access to a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot that they can fill out if they don’t receive the requested ballot in time.

And while all voters are required to mail their ballots by Election Day, most states also give overseas and military voters

Here’s where overseas and military voters can return their ballots using the internet



Democratic party volunteers pose at an event in Rome aimed at encouraging U.S. citizens abroad to vote in the forthcoming presidential election. REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo


© REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo
Democratic party volunteers pose at an event in Rome aimed at encouraging U.S. citizens abroad to vote in the forthcoming presidential election. REUTERS/Crispian Balmer/File Photo

  • While reliable online voting will likely never be a reality for all voters, most states permit voters in the military and those who live overseas to vote remotely.  
  • In 2020, 32 states will allow some or all overseas and military voters to return their ballots digitally via fax, email, and in a few states, with an online portal. 
  • Electronic transmission can give military voters serving in remote areas with spotty mail delivery a better chance of having their votes counted, but also raises numerous security concerns. 
  • One expert told Business Insider that online ballot transmission leaves voters with little option to verify that their choices were counted accurately and also increases the risk of malware attacks on elections officials. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Reliable online voting for everyone will, in all likelihood, never be a reality, experts say. But in 2020, many states give military and overseas voters the option to transmit their absentee ballots online. 

Members of the Armed Services and their families, diplomats, and private United States citizens living abroad all have the right to vote absentee in federal elections under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA), a law first passed in the 1980s and further expanded with the MOVE Act, which was passed by Congress in 2009.

Voters covered under UOCAVA have the option to request a ballot for every election in a given year, have that ballot mailed to them no later than 45 days before the election, return it without needing to pay postage, and also have access to a Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot that they can fill out

SpaceX, L3Harris win missile-warning satellite contracts from US military

The U.S. military has picked SpaceX and L3Harris Technologies to build up a new missile-warning satellite system in space.

In separate contracts, SpaceX and L3Harris will each provide four infrared satellites devoted to missile tracking as part of the larger National Defense Space Architecture program. The contract, awarded by the Department of Defense’s Space Development Agency (SDA), gives $193.5 million to L3Harris and $149 million to SpaceX. The satellites should be ready by the end of fiscal year 2022. 

“The satellites will be able to provide missile tracking data for hypersonic glide vehicles, and the next generation of advanced missile threats,” Derek Tournear, SDA director, said in a statement.

Related: What is a ballistic missile and how does it work?

SpaceX, originally a launch provider using its Falcon rockets, has entered the satellite construction market with its Starlink constellation of internet satellites. The company has launched more than 700 of the satellites in the last two years  and manufactures them at a facility in Seattle, Washington. L3Harris is an aerospace company with a history of military contracts for aircraft and missile defense. 

The new missile-tracking satellites will provide information to a separate set of 28 “transport satellites,” which will take offensive action based on what the missile trackers find. Construction for the 28 transport satellites will be awarded in a separate solicitation, SDA added.

“The transport satellites are the backbone of the National Defense Space Architecture,” Tournear said. “They take data from multiple tracking systems, fuse those, and are able to calculate a fire control solution, and then the transport satellites will be able to send those data down directly to a weapons platform via a tactical data link, or some other means.”

Taken together, the transport satellites and the missile-tracking satellites will be the first “tranche”

Leading Military Website Task & Purpose Joins The War Zone at Brookline Media

NEW YORK, Oct. 5, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Task & Purpose, a leading digital media website for active-duty military members, veterans, and their families, announced today it was joining the Brookline Media network of sites, immediately creating one of the largest footprints in the military-focused media market.

“I launched Task & Purpose to give a platform and voice to our remarkable servicemen and women,” said Zach Iscol, Task & Purpose co-founder. “And I could not be prouder of all the team has achieved, from taking on difficult topics like sexual harassment and how we care for our sick and wounded to supporting Gold Star families and telling the stories of unsung heroes and fallen warriors, and so much more.”

“With Brookline’s expertise in digital media, complementary audiences, and passion for supporting our nation’s troops, I couldn’t think of a better team to be working with moving forward to take Task & Purpose to the next level.”

The addition of Task & Purpose to the Brookline Media portfolio immediately creates one of the largest digital media footprints in the military market, with Task & Purpose dedicated to bringing news and engaging content to current and former service members, its sister site Military Spouse Fest connecting and supporting military families, and The War Zone covering the intersection of defense, military technology, and foreign policy. Together these sites reach more than 11 million unique visitors and deliver more than 15 million page views each month.

Task & Purpose was founded in 2014 with a mission to inform, engage, entertain, and stand up for active-duty military members, veterans, and their families. The site quickly became one of the most trusted news and investigative journalism sources for the military, with its journalists reporting everywhere from the Pentagon to The White House and beyond.

Since its

Mothers are using the $460 Explore Air 2 Cricut label maker to tidy homes with military precision

Mothers are using a label maker to tidy their homes with military precision for spring, eliminating the hassle of rummaging in drawers forever.

The craze began when an Australian woman posted photos of her immaculately organised home in a Facebook group.

She told members she used the $460 ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut from arts and crafts store Spotlight to label storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne.

The machine – which creates labels on everything from cardboard and vinyl to thicker materials like leather – heralds the end to rooting and misplacing belongings because the contents of containers can be clearly displayed on the front.

Scroll down for video

A mother used the 'Explore Air 2' Cricut from Spotlight to label everything from storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne

A mother used the ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut from Spotlight to label everything from storage boxes and pantry baskets in the new house her family has just moved into in Melbourne

Photos of her labelling have drawn delighted responses from fellow mums

Their comments include 'wow this is nice', 'goals' and 'serious label envy'

Photos of her labelling (left and right) have drawn delighted responses from fellow mums, with comments including ‘wow this is nice’, ‘goals’ and ‘serious label envy’

Photos of her house-wide labelling have drawn delighted responses from fellow mums, with comments including ‘wow this is nice’, ‘goals’ and ‘serious label envy’.

‘Can I borrow you for a weekend to do my house?’ one woman asked.

A second called the organisation ‘next level’ while a third described it as ‘an awesome job’.

Others were inspired to invest in a label maker of their own.

The $460 'Explore Air 2' Cricut label maker, available from arts and crafts store Spotlight

The $460 ‘Explore Air 2’ Cricut label maker, available from arts and crafts store Spotlight

The Cricut - which creates labels on everything from cardboard and vinyl to thicker materials like leather - heralds the end to rooting in drawers forever

The Cricut – which creates labels on everything from cardboard and vinyl to thicker materials like leather – heralds the end to rooting in drawers forever

‘Just ordered one of these tonight for the same purpose,’ said one woman.

Another tagged her friend