Cellmate: Male chastity gadget hack could lock users in

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Pen Test Partners

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The Cellmate has been sold via several big-name online retailers as well as niche stores

A security flaw in a hi-tech chastity belt for men made it possible for hackers to remotely lock all the devices in use simultaneously.

The internet-linked sheath has no manual override, so owners might have been faced with the prospect of having to use a grinder or bolt cutter to free themselves from its metal clamp.

The sex toy’s app has been fixed by its Chinese developer after a team of UK security professionals flagged the bug.

They have also published a workaround.

This could be useful to anyone still using the old version of the app who finds themselves locked in as a result of an attacker making use of the revelation.

Any other attempt to cut through the device’s plastic body poses a risk of harm.

Image copyright

Pen Test Partners

Image caption

The workaround involves prising open the circuit board and pressing batteries against two of the wires to trigger a motor

Pen Test Partners (PTP) – the Buckingham-based cyber-security firm involved – has a reputation for bringing quirky discoveries to light, including problems with other sex toys in the past.

It says the latest discovery indicates that the makers of “smart” adult-themed products still have lessons to learn.

“The problem is that manufacturers of these other toys sometimes rush their products to market,” commented Alex Lomas, a researcher at the firm.

“Most times the problem is a disclosure of sensitive personal data, but in this case, you can get physically locked in.”

Lock and clamp

Qiui’s Cellmate Chastity Cage is sold online for about $190 (£145) and is marketed as a way for owners to give a partner control over access to their body.

‘Smart’ male chastity device vulnerable to locking by hackers: researchers

A security flaw in an internet-connected male chastity device could allow hackers to remotely lock it — leaving users trapped, researchers have warned.

The Cellmate, produced by Chinese firm Qiui, is a cover that clamps on the base of the male genitals with a hardened steel ring, and does not have a physical key or manual override.

The locking mechanism is controlled with a smartphone app via Bluetooth — marketed as both an anti-cheating and a submission sex play device — but security researchers have found multiple flaws that leave it vulnerable to hacking.

“We discovered that remote attackers could prevent the Bluetooth lock from being opened, permanently locking the user in the device. There is no physical unlock,” British security firm Pen Test Partners said Tuesday.

“An angle grinder or other suitable heavy tool would be required to cut the wearer free.”

The firm also found other security flaws in the Cellmate — listed for $189 on Qiui’s website — that could expose sensitive user information such as names, phone numbers, birthdays and location data.

“It wouldn’t take an attacker more than a couple of days to exfiltrate the entire user database and use it for blackmail or phishing,” PTP’s Alex Lomas wrote in their report on the device.

“A number of countries have oppressive laws that may expose users of these types of devices to unwarranted interest from law enforcement and bigots.”

Qiui did not immediately respond to AFP’s request for comment.

PTP said it reached out to Qiui in April this year, identifying the flaws.

Qiui fixed most of the issues by updating the software, but left the older version active and its users still vulnerable, PTP added, saying other researchers had found similar issues.

Such smart sex toys and devices are among the wave of new

Male chastity gadget hack could lock users in

A security flaw in a hi-tech chastity belt for men made it possible for hackers to remotely lock all the devices in use simultaneously.

The internet-linked sheath has no manual override, so owners might have been faced with the prospect of having to use a grinder or bolt cutter to free themselves from its metal clamp.

The sex toy’s app has been fixed by its Chinese developer after a team of UK security professionals flagged the bug.

They have also published a workaround.

This could be useful to anyone still using the old version of the app who finds themselves locked in as a result of an attacker making use of the revelation.

Any other attempt to cut through the device’s plastic body poses a risk of harm.

Pen Test Partners (PTP) – the Buckingham-based cyber-security firm involved – has a reputation for bringing quirky discoveries to light, including problems with other sex toys in the past.

It says the latest discovery indicates that the makers of “smart” adult-themed products still have lessons to learn.

“The problem is that manufacturers of these other toys sometimes rush their products to market,” commented Alex Lomas, a researcher at the firm.

“Most times the problem is a disclosure of sensitive personal data, but in this case, you can get physically locked in.”

Lock and clamp

Qiui’s Cellmate Chastity Cage is sold online for about $190 (£145) and is marketed as a way for owners to give a partner control over access to their body.

Pen Test Partners believe about 40,000 devices have been sold based on the number of IDs that have been granted by its Guangdong-based creator.

The cage wirelessly connects to a smartphone via a Bluetooth signal, which is used to trigger the device’s lock-and-clamp mechanism.

But to achieve this, the

The Science Femme Was Allegedly a White Male Professor Who Posed as Woman of Color and Bullied Women

“The Science Femme” claimed to be a female academic. She claimed to have upended efforts by her social justice-obsessed department to draft a statement condemning racism.

And when Twitter users accused her of racism, she claimed to be a woman of color herself—and an immigrant to boot.

But The Science Femme, who tweeted from the handle @piney_the, wasn’t any of those things, digital sleuths began alleging late last month. Instead, they claimed, “she” was Craig Chapman, a white male assistant professor of chemistry at the University of New Hampshire. The allegations, bolstered by an internal chemistry department email, would make Chapman at least the fourth white academic revealed to have posed as a person of color in recent weeks.

In three of those cases, academics are accused of shamelessly trying to further their own careers. But in Chapman’s case, Twitter users who came into contact with @piney_the say the account harassed real women working in science.

The University of New Hampshire said the incident was under investigation.

“UNH was recently made aware of allegations on social media about a member of its faculty,” a spokesperson told The Daily Beast. “We are deeply troubled by what we’ve learned so far and immediately launched an investigation. The employee at the center of allegations on social media is on leave and not in the classroom. In order to protect the integrity of the ongoing investigation the university is unable to comment further.”

Chapman did not return repeated requests for comment for this story. Both his account and @piney_the were deleted last week.

Susanna Harris, a microbiology Ph.D. holder who currently works in science communications, first noticed the @piney_the Twitter account in July.

“They put out this huge long thread about how they, as a woman of color in science, a professor, made a