NBCU ad boss adds local ads, Symphony, and new data unit to purview

NBCUniversal ad boss Linda Yaccarino is taking on a larger role within the media conglomerate as global chairman of advertising and partnerships, the company announced on Monday.

The promotion, effective immediately, positions Yaccarino, who has been spearheading an initiative to create a single ad-buying system that spans TV and digital, to unite more parts of NBCU’s ad business.

Yaccarino previously was chairman of advertising and partnerships, managing the media company’s portfolio of linear networks like NBC, digital platforms like Peacock, distribution partnerships, and client relationships.

In her new role, she adds to her purview NBCU’s local ads, company-wide marketing strategies, and a new data-strategy team that she’s charged with building. She continues to report to CEO Jeff Shell.

As part of the change: 

  • Local ads will be added to One Platform, NBCU’s all-in-one ad-buying system, which Yaccarino leads. The team that sells ads across NBCU’s local-TV stations and regional-sports networks, run by local-sales revenue chief Frank Comerford, will report into Yaccarino.
  • Yaccarino will oversee NBCU’s strategic initiatives, led by SVP Kathy Kelly-Brown. That includes NBCU’s Symphony marketing campaigns that rally the company around moments, like Peacock’s debut or the Olympic Games. Under Yaccarino’s oversight, the team will start talks with major advertisers about opening up Symphony, similar to the way it works with a “council” of Peacock sponsors to test ad formats for the streaming service. 
  • Yaccarino is building a data-strategy unit charged with bringing together research from across the organization to grow the company’s revenue. The team, which will be led by a data chief who has not yet been named, will work on creating unified anonymous identifies for NBCU audiences, using data to scale NBCU’s new shoppable ads, and using research to inform that ad experience, like reimagining what ads look like in movies on Peacock versus TV

Meet Alice Valdez, a local musician providing art programming for underserved communities

HOUSTON – For some students in Houston, music, art, dance or theater programming may not always be available in school. However, one community-based non-profit organization is committed to underserved youth and adults in the city.

Known as the Multicultural Education and Counseling through the Arts (MECA), the organization founded by Alice Valdez provides cultural programming, education resources, community building and events to more than 4,000 students and families each year.

With a mission to help build discipline, self-esteem and cultural pride, MECA founder and Executive Director Alice Valdez has proudly served our community for more than 40 years.

Alice Valdez
Alice Valdez (Copyright Forest Photography 2019.)

Born in El Paso, Texas, Alice Valdez began her music career in elementary school.

“My mother decided that all of us were going to play instruments,” recalled Valdez, founder of MECA.

Valdez began with the clarinet and picked up the oboe in middle school. It wasn’t until college when she began focusing on her career in music with the help of her college professor.

“I started taking oboe lessons from Mr. Henderson from the University of Texas-El Paso. He was the theory teacher and the oboe teacher there,” stated Valdez. “He was just such a strong influence and such a wonderful educator that he really influenced me to go study art and music education.”

Alice Valdez at a MECA event
Alice Valdez at a MECA event (Pin Lim, Forest Photography)

With a dedication to the arts and music education, Valdez would begin a new opportunity in Houston with a focus on minorities and underprivileged communities in the Sixth Ward.

“Some schools had a band, some schools had orchestras, some schools didn’t have a band or orchestras. All they had was maybe visual art and general music,” said Valdez. “Obviously, the suburban schools had much stronger programs, and the inner city programs where

Four Simple Strategies For Getting Local SEO Right

By Jon Clark, managing partner at Moving Traffic Media, a boutique digital marketing agency offering PPC, display and SEO services in White Plains, NY.

Want to know a secret about organic search results? It’s super easy to be found high in them — so easy, in fact, that if you’re not ranking high, it’s almost a guarantee that you’re missing something in your local search engine optimization (SEO). 

It isn’t that you’re not trying. Instead, it’s more that you might not understand just how essential some of the simpler things are. You’re putting too many eggs into the wrong baskets and not enough into the ones that count. 

So, if you’re ready to fix what might be wrong with your local SEO, here is your starting point. 

1. Remember The Fundamentals

Here are some key elements to get right to set a solid foundation for your business online.

Choose Your Name Wisely

When choosing a name for your business, give serious thought to how it will or will not come up in search engines.

Let’s say you own a local beauty and cosmetics store called The Tool Box. Sure, the name is clever and catchy, but you’re more likely to come up in searches for sledgehammers than you are for mascara.

Also, a location-based name can inadvertently kill your local SEO strategy. “Santa Fe Body Shop” is going to come up in Santa Fe-based searches, but not for neighboring towns. So, resist the urge to put your location into your business name.

Location, Location, Location

Many local businesses run completely out of a small office space or the owner’s home. Be honest about your address with search directories, even if it means you only submit information to those that will let you keep your address private. 

Faking a

Digital8’s Joe McCord on how to improve local SEO for your small business

Making a splash in any industry can be a challenge, but increasingly, getting noticed online is proving to be difficult for small businesses in such a cluttered digital landscape.



a man looking at the camera: Joe-McCord-advice-local-SEO


© Provided by Smart Company
Joe-McCord-advice-local-SEO

One of the best ways to ensure your company website is hitting all the right notes to maximise appearing in search results is through local SEO.

Local SEO is important, especially for small businesses that operate on a regional level, as opposed to a national level.

Though national SEO primarily focuses on ranking in searches for the entire country, local SEO focuses on narrowing the scope of search parameters, instead aiming to appear in search engine result pages within a specific local area.  

There are several steps businesses can take to improve their search engine rankings (order of appearance on result pages) that can ultimately boost the number of visits they get to their sites.

What is local SEO? 

Starting with the basics, SEO stands for search engine optimisation.

So local SEO is a type of search engine optimisation strategy that assists small businesses in becoming more visible in the local search results on Google. 

Local search simulation 

This is one of the most powerful Google local ranking factors that, if used effectively, will help your business rank highly.

A good strategy is to always begin by researching keywords using the best keyword tools available.

Knowing what your customers are searching for can help you target your content towards them.

The fact that Google abolished its local search filter makes it hard to simulate Google local search results from a different location. 

Though things have gotten a little complex, you can try things such as incorporating the ‘near’ parameter in your URL.

After you have put the query, the SEOs will add the ‘&near=cityname’.

Using

India offers Samsung and iPhone suppliers new incentives to boost local production

India is giving more than a dozen companies new incentives to invest in the country’s smartphone industry, bolstering an ambitious campaign from Prime Minister Narendra Modi to rebrand the country as the world’s next manufacturing hub.



a person holding a camera: An employee tests the camera quality of mobile phones on an assembly line in the mobile phone plant of Rising Stars Mobile India Pvt., a unit of Foxconn Technology Co., in Sri City, Andhra pradesh, India, on Thursday, July 11, 2019. Foxconn, also known as Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., opened its first India factory four years ago, it now operates two assembly plants with plans to expand those and open two more. The company was integral to Chinas transformation into a manufacturing colossus, and founder Terry Gou has told India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi that Foxconn could help India do the same. Photographer: Karen Dias/Bloomberg via Getty Images


© Karen Dias/Bloomberg via Getty Images
An employee tests the camera quality of mobile phones on an assembly line in the mobile phone plant of Rising Stars Mobile India Pvt., a unit of Foxconn Technology Co., in Sri City, Andhra pradesh, India, on Thursday, July 11, 2019. Foxconn, also known as Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., opened its first India factory four years ago, it now operates two assembly plants with plans to expand those and open two more. The company was integral to Chinas transformation into a manufacturing colossus, and founder Terry Gou has told India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi that Foxconn could help India do the same. Photographer: Karen Dias/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The program includes 16 companies involved in making smartphones and components, including Samsung, Austria’s AT&S and several Indian firms. Major Apple suppliers Foxconn, Wistron and Pegatron are participating as well — notable inclusions, given how much Apple has been pushing to grab a larger slice of one of the world’s fastest growing smartphone markets.

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The companies have to increase their production of smartphones in the country to benefit, according to a Tuesday statement from India’s Ministry of Electronics and Information and Technology. They will get incentives worth between 4% and 6% of the sales of certain products made in India over a period of 5 years.

The incentive program is expected to bring 110 billion rupees ($1.5 billion) worth of investment to the country’s electronics manufacturing industry, according to the government statement.

The government’s decision to incentivize smartphone makers isn’t a huge surprise. The industry has been