YouTube Unveils Programming Centered on Black Leaders in Fashion

YouTube.com/Fashion released programming Tuesday focused on Black leaders in fashion as part of its broader commitment to amplify Black voices and perspectives.

The platform spotlights 12 designers and fashion industry leaders, including Virgil Abloh, Grace Wales Bonner, Naomi Campbell, Stella Jean, Jerry Lorenzo, Adebayo Oke-Lawal, Kenneth Nicholson, Tremaine Emory, Laduma Ngxokolo, Andrea Iyamah, Samuel Ross and Felisha Noel, and includes runway shows, films, interviews and behind-the-scenes content.

The programming can be found on a dedicated shelf on the fashion homepage, and is part of larger partnership efforts to elevate Black fashion leaders and grow their YouTube presence.

“This year has been an incredible moment for all industries, including fashion, to reflect on the ways it attends to diversity and representation,” said Derek Blasberg, head of fashion and beauty, YouTube.

“YouTube is the home for diverse voices and perspectives and we have a unique opportunity to use our platform to spotlight Black fashion talent and grow their audiences on YouTube. This past year alone, we’ve seen incredible content that lifts up diverse voices and the programming we’re debuting today and in the coming years builds upon this work. Now, more than ever, it’s vital to not only support but center on our Black creators, brands, designers and fashion professionals,” added Blasberg.

Among some of the programming is Off/White men’s fall 2020 collection designed by Abloh, the Louis Vuitton men’s spring 2021 show in Tokyo, designed by Abloh; A-Cold-Wall’s spring collection, designed by Samuel Ross, and “Thinkin Home,” a 2020 film by Jeano Edwards and Wales Bonner. In addition, fashion designer Felisha Noel shares her story of going from the finance industry to owner and founder of a Brooklyn-based women’s wear brand, Fe Noel.

 

FOR MORE STORIES: 

Media People: Derek Blasberg of YouTube Fashion

YouTube’s Now Testing Shopping Features

 

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COVID-19 budgets, data security, and automation are concerns of IT leaders and staff

Dueling surveys from Kaseya showed that IT department leaders share their underlings’ worries about security and productivity.

IT technician with network equipment and cables

Image: Getty Images/iStockphoto

IT infrastructure and security management company Kaseya have released a two-part report featuring insights gleaned from surveys of both IT leaders and IT practitioners. The two reports—”Technical Priorities for IT Practitioners” and “Strategic Priorities for IT Leaders”–show that members of both sides of IT departments share broad concerns on a variety of issues including data protection and security. 

The researchers behind the study spoke with 878 respondents in July 2020, more than 500 of whom were IT practitioners and 335 were IT leaders. According to the survey responses, IT leaders are more concerned with ensuring that operations are always up and running amid coronavirus-related budget shortages, while the managers and technicians working daily with technology are more focused on maintaining productivity using limited resources.

“Our 2020 IT Operations survey makes it clear that IT leaders and practitioners are trying to do as much as they can today with far fewer resources than usual,” said Mike Puglia, chief strategy officer at Kaseya. 

“Understanding the new challenges that IT leaders and practitioners will face in 2021, we are committed to continuing to evolve and improve the solutions we make available to manage and solve those challenges.”

SEE: TechRepublic Premium editorial calendar: IT policies, checklists, toolkits, and research for download (TechRepublic Premium)

Data protection and security were something both sides of the IT coin could agree on, with both leaders and employees highlighting the startling increase in cyberattacks since the onset of the pandemic and the need for more focus on protecting organizational data. 

According to the survey, “Improving IT security” was the top priority in 2020 for more than half of IT practitioners and 60% of IT leaders. “Cybersecurity and data protection”

Nurturing next generation leaders and experts; two paths to prosperity

The digital transformation underway across all sectors of the economy means that demand for technology professionals is soaring.

Even before the pandemic, it was clear that demand for technology skills and leadership was on the march. A study conducted by Faethm in association with the Australian Computer Society (ACS) reveals that although automation and AI are going to transform all industry sectors and displace some workers, over the coming 15 years as many as 5.6 million new jobs could be added to the Australian economy – a quarter of them in technology-related roles.

The annual Digital Pulse report – prepared by Deloitte for the ACS – suggests that the nation’s technology workforce will grow by just over 3 per cent for the next five years, and reach a million people by 2027. It’s an encouraging trajectory but an organisation like Iress, a fintech which is founded on solving complex problems with technology, needs capable, intelligent people who like solving complex problems now. It needs people who are skilled at collaborating with colleagues both face to face and online, and schooled in agile approaches to problem-solving. And it needs leaders to help them do that.

The challenge for organisations as they navigate their skills requirements is to pay careful attention to different career trajectories. Is an individual best placed as an expert or leader? Where does their passion lie? What are their aspirations and how can they be nurtured?

A resilient, next-generation workforce emerges by balancing the skills equation carefully – nurturing leaders and investing in the skills of experts.

Iress chief technology officer Andrew Todd says: “In my experience, career progression has often been a path of becoming a technical specialist in the role – whatever the technical speciality might be – then you become a team leader, a

Business leaders say global economy faces worst crisis in a century

  • Business leaders from the engagement group Business Twenty (B20) have called for urgent reforms to be made if the global economy is to recover from its worst crisis in a century due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • “The global economy is in its worst state in a century,” warned Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of the B20. 
  • B20 proposed 25 recommendations for the G-20 group that fall into three key areas, including empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Top business leaders around the world say the global economy is experiencing its worst crisis in one hundred years and have called for urgent reforms to be implemented in the G-20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia in November.

The Business Twenty (B20), an engagement group of high-level CEOs worldwide seeking to represent the business community, put forward 25 policy recommendations on Monday for the meeting of the Group of 20 richest nations next month. These suggested reforms would help put the economy on a strong road to recovery once the pandemic comes to an end, the group said.

Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of the B20 warned that “the global economy is in its worst state in a century,” adding that “the challenging opportunity is to build back better, with real urgency required from policymakers and business leaders.”

Al-Benyan said, “As the economic recovery evolves over the next couple of years, downside risks remain elevated,” including trade tensions, policy uncertainty, geopolitical strains and building financial vulnerabilities, as countries try to overcome the impact of the coronavirus pandemic.

Coronavirus has already claimed over a million lives around the world and has brought the global economy to its knees. In its most recent report, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development(OECD) warned global growth would drop by 4.5% this

Business leaders call for urgent reforms as global economy faces its ‘worst state in a century’

  • On Monday, business leaders under the Business Twenty group made 22 policy recommendations for the G-20 group.
  • Each recommendation fell into three key areas: empowering people, safeguarding the planet and shaping new frontiers.



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Top business leaders say the global economy is facing its worst crisis in a hundred years, and “downside risks remain elevated” unless urgent reforms are enacted during the G-20 summit hosted by Saudi Arabia in November.

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“The global economy is in its worst state in a century,” warned Yousef Al-Benyan, chairman of Business Twenty (B20), a group made up of high-level CEOs from around the world. “The challenging opportunity is to build back better, with real urgency required from policymakers and business leaders,” he added.

Business Twenty is an engagement group that seeks to represent the voice of the global business community across all member states and economic sectors in the Group of 20.

The group is urging G-20 leaders to undertake “bold and broad based” policy action to put the post-pandemic economic recovery on a stronger, more stable growth path. It said trade tensions, policy uncertainty, geopolitical strains and building financial vulnerabilities were key risks to the outlook, as societies and economies navigate the crippling impact of the coronavirus.

“As the economic recovery evolves over the next couple of years, downside risks remain elevated,” Al-Benyan said, raising concern about low productivity growth and rising inequalities. 

“Business has its share of responsibilities to honor and a substantial role to play in building back an economy that is socially inclusive and environmentally sustainable,” he added.

Saudi Arabia will be the first country in the Middle East and North Africa region to host a G-20 summit. The event brings together the leaders of the largest economies of the world to address financial