PS4 update lets parents decide which games kids can chat in

Sony is giving the PlayStation 4 one more big update before the PS5 arrives, and it’s particularly good news for parents. A version 8.00 update releasing today makes multiple additions, including simpler and more adaptable parental controls. Limits on communication and viewing user-made content are now lumped together to make it “easier for parents to understand.” Crucially, kids can now ask for permission to use communications in specific games — you can make an exception if you know a young one will be talking to friends.



a close up of a speaker: PS4 Slim with DualShock 4 controller


PS4 Slim with DualShock 4 controller

Not everything is positive. The 8.00 update removes user-made events and the creation of private communities. You can still use private communities that already exist, but they’ll clearly dwindle without the option to make more. Sony hasn’t explained the move, but we’ve asked for comment.

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There are more additions that might offset that decision. Party and Messages are now more closely connected, with a new interface that uses the same groups for party voice chats and messages. Two-factor authentication finally supports third-party authenticator apps during activation as well as sign-ins across PS4, mobile apps and the web. And you can finally mute all mics from the Quick Menu — you don’t have to wade through menus (if your headset doesn’t have a mute switch) just to take a quick break from the action.

Sony is also updating its Remote Play apps for phones and computers to enable PS5 connections, although that clearly won’t be useful until the new console’s November 12th debut.

You might not want to rush to update to 8.00 when there are reports (albeit a handful) of party and friend issues. We’ve asked Sony about those as well. Even so, it’s hard not to be at least a bit sentimental about this update.

Prime Day Fire tablet deals: Get a Fire HD 10 or Fire HD 8 Kids Edition for just $80

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

Get ready, online shoppers. Amazon Prime Day 2020 technically starts on Tuesday, but many of the deals are already live. Case in point: Previously announced sale prices on Fire tablets are now available. The Fire HD 10, Amazon’s best tablet, has dropped down to just $80 ($70 off), the lowest price we’ve ever seen for it. The Kids Edition of the Fire HD 8 is also down to $80. Price drops on the 7-inch version of the Kids Edition haven’t hit yet, but Amazon has already pledged that it will be dropping to $60, which is $40 off its list price of $100. Both Fire Kids Edition tablets include a case and a year of Amazon’s Kids Plus subscription service, a $36 value.

So far, we don’t see price drops on the “adult” versions of the Fire HD 8HD 8 Plus and Fire 7, but we’ll keep an eye on their prices since Amazon often slips previously unannounced deals on its devices into Prime Day.

David Carnoy/CNET

Amazon has come a long way from the first Kindle Fire tablet. The Amazon Fire HD 10 is Amazon’s biggest tablet with a 10-inch screen size and powerful speakers (it now charges via USB-C). Just like its smaller 8-inch sibling, the Fire HD 8, the tablet is packed with benefits for Prime subscribers, making it easy for members to stream and download movies, TV shows and games. The Fire tablets don’t use a pure version of Android, but instead Amazon’s Android-based Fire operating system, and pull apps from the Amazon App Store. You can still get apps from Google Play, but you’ll have

Prime Day preview: Deals on Kindle Paperwhite and Kindle Kids

This story is part of Amazon Prime Day, CNET’s guide on everything you need to know and how to make sure you get the best deal.

If you’re in the market for a dedicated e-reader, Amazon will once again will have nice discounts on some of its Kindle e-readers as part of Prime Day 2020. The Kindle Paperwhite will be $80, or $50 off, beating its all-time previous low by $5. 

If that isn’t the type of Kindle deal you’re looking for, Amazon also announced that the Kids Edition of its entry-level Kindle, which now has an integrated light, will cost $75 or $35 off its list price of $110. The Kindle Kids Edition includes a case and a year of Amazon’s Kid Plus subscription service, a $36 value.

Read more: Best e-reader for 2020

Furthermore, Amazon will be offering a $5 credit for “any Kindle book” with the purchase of select Kindle devices.

Like most of the other Prime Day sales, these are expected to begin on Tuesday, Oct. 13 at 12:01 a.m. PT and last for up to 48 hours. If you’re not seeing the deal you were hoping for, don’t lose hope — experience has shown us that there are likely other Prime Day Kindle deals to come.

It’s unclear whether the higher-end Kindle Oasis or baseline Kindle (non-Kids Edition) will also be on sale, but we’ll keep an eye on their prices because Amazon often slips previously unannounced deals on its devices into Prime Day. 

David Carnoy/CNET

Amazon has come a long way from the first Kindle Fire tablet. The Amazon Fire HD 10 is Amazon’s biggest tablet with a 10-inch screen size and powerful speakers (it now charges via USB-C). Just like its smaller 8-inch sibling, the Fire HD 8, the tablet is packed

Wondershop will make physical and digital kids games backed by Supercell cofounders

Wondershop has raised money from Supercell’s cofounders to make games that can make an impact on children who need encouragement and social inclusion.

The Helsinki-based company is a for-profit game studio that has spun out of the We Foundation, a nonprofit started by the founders of Supercell, the maker of Clash Royale and Clash of Clans. Tencent bought Supercell in 2016 at a valuation of $10.2 billion. Supercell’s founders, Ilkka Paananen and Mikko Kodisoja, started the We Foundation to give back to Finland and help Finnish families.

The foundation operates a community house for children in East Helsinki. The hub, Meltsi, is a community gathering place for children, where they wear a wristband that functions as a game controller. That’s the physical side of the game studio. Wondershop is also working on its first game, Wonderworld, a community game designed to drive social inclusion. That’s the digital side of the studio.

The idea is to redefine the societal role of games, Wondershop CEO Annastiina Salminen said in an interview with GamesBeat. “We want to create this welcoming, inspiring, educational space targeting those who may be at risk” for social exclusion or discrimination, Salminen said. “We want to build and support a vibrant local community.”


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Above: Me-säätiön toimitusjohtaja Annastiina Salminen.

Image Credit: Wondershop

Wondershop is a unique hybrid of a game studio and a foundation, and the majority share of the company’s profits are used to support non-profit work among kids and youth.

Wonderworld’s mission is to advance social equity and inclusion among kids and youth. The gaming experience combines the digital realm with the physical world: children access the game world using a wristband that works as a game controller, and different community