Fire TV Stick, Kindle And More Amazon Devices Have Huge Discounts For Prime Day

Amazon Prime Day 2020 has officially begun. Today, October14, you can find tons of deals from the online retailer on a wide variety of products, ranging from video games, movies, tabletop games, and much more. But if you’re big on Amazon’s varied ecosystem of electronics, you’ll be happy to know that many of their most popular devices have been marked down for the occasion.

With so many different deals available on Amazon’s plethora of devices, it can be a little overwhelming trying to find the best savings, so we’ve rounded up some of the best deals we’ve found so far. These deals cover a range of Amazon devices, including the retailer’s latest tablets, speakers, and Fire-enabled TVs. If you want to listen to music, there are cheap options available. If you’re looking to save on an Echo Show to help keep in touch with relatives, there are deals for you, as well.

If you’re curious about some of the biggest deals, check out our Prime Day 2020 hub. Plus, see our roundup guide to the very best game deals across all retailers, including Amazon, Target, Walmart, and more.

Inside Singapore’s huge bet on vertical farming

From the outside, VertiVegies looked like a handful of grubby shipping containers put side by side and drilled together. A couple of meters in height, they were propped up on a patch of concrete in one of Singapore’s nondescript suburbs. But once he was inside, Ankesh Shahra saw potential. Huge potential. 

Shahra, who wears his dark hair floppy and his expensive-looking shirts with their top button casually undone, had a lot of experience in the food industry. His grandfather had founded the Ruchi Group, a corporate powerhouse in India with offshoots in steel, real estate, and agriculture; his father had started Ruchi Soya, a $3 billion oilseed processor that had been Shahra’s training ground.

By the time Shahra was introduced to VertiVegies founder Veera Sekaran at a friend’s party in 2017, he was hungry to make his own entrepreneurial mark. A previous attempt had involved sourcing organic food from around Asia: “an eye-opening experience, one with a lot of pressure,” he says. It helped him spot a problem that needed solving. 

“I’d seen how much dependency farmers have globally on weather,” he says. “Yields were hugely erratic: there are so many inconsistencies and dependencies that it’s a hugely difficult profession for the bulk of farmers. The perishable supply chain was so broken.”

And what Shahra saw when he stepped into Sekaran’s repurposed shipping containers was a solution. 

Inside, mismatched plastic trays sat carefully stacked on industrial metal shelves, stretching all the way from the concrete floor to the corrugated-steel ceiling. In each tray were small green plants of different species and sizes, all with their roots bathed in the same watery solution, their leaves curling up toward the same pink glow of faintly humming LED bar lights above. 

edible violas
A controlled environment means VertiVegies’s food, such as edible flowers, can be

ASX’s ‘atrocious’ revamped website a ‘huge fail’

The new ASX website has got off to a disastrous start — crashing, not showing company announcements, missing old features — and users aren’t happy.

The site has a sleeker look than the old one but has far less at-a-glance market data on its home page, with the standard ASX200 prices list seemingly axed.

A company spokesman recommended users set up their own personal watchlist instead.

As the trading session opened, the bourse tweeted: “ASX announcements are currently not displaying on the ASX website. All company announcements are available to view via brokers and news agencies.”

“Huge fail for the @ASX,” @eadatt tweeted while @SmallCapEagle labelled the new website “atrocious” and implored: “Kindly put the old one back.”

“The new website is a disaster! One can no longer easily see that there is a company announcement relevant to a particular security on their watchlist, there are no longer ‘sector comparisons’ on the page of a particular security, the feedback page or investors page won’t open …” @cnboston wrote.

Another user wrote: “Where is the multiple price search on the new website? Can anyone point me in the right direction? Help!”

Shareholder activist Stephen Mayne was also critical.

“The old ASX website had an archive of every listed company announcement back to 1998 – the new version launched over the weekend starts at 2016. Let’s hope they fix this – fast,” he wrote.

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These 10 tech predictions could mean huge changes ahead

An on-going health crisis and a global recession: even for the most attuned of analysts, the past months have brought in a load of unexpected events that have made the coming years especially difficult to envision. 

Yet research firm CCS Insights has taken up the challenge and delivered a set of 100 tech predictions for the years 2021 and beyond. The exercise is an annual one for the company, which last year anticipated, among many other things, that the next decade could see the rise of deep fake detection technology, or the adoption of domestic robots in some households. 

One year later, and many of those predictions have been affected in a way or the other by the COVID-19 pandemic. “What we’ve seen in the last few months has completely transformed a lot of the areas we cover,” Angela Ashenden, principal analyst at CCS Insights, told ZDNet. “So, many of the predictions that we’ve put forward this year could only have been this year.”

Underpinning many of the trends that the analytics firm identified for the next few years is, unsurprisingly, the radical transformation of work that the health crisis has brought about. CCS Insights anticipated that in 2022, more than half of all office-based employees will still mainly be working from home, while a third of large firms by then will have cut their spending on office locations by an average of 20%.

There have been plenty of reports delivering similar verdicts since the global WFH experiment started in March. The latest statistics from the UK’s Institute of Directors, for instance, show that almost three quarters (74%) of company directors said they would keep increased remote working even after the crisis subsides, while more than half reported that they intended to reduce the use of workplaces. 

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